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Parshat Ki Teitzei  

a.k.a   (Deuteronomy 21: 10 – 25: 19) 

 

Moses continued telling the people what God had commanded. If a soldier saw a beautiful woman among the conquered people, and wished to marry her, then he had to bring her home where she was to be given a month to mourn the loss of her father and mother. After that, the man could consummate the marriage. If the man did not experience fulfilment, then he could release the woman. However, he was not to sell her or regard her as merchandise. 

If a man had two wives and hated one while loving the other, he could not reduce the inheritance of his first-born son if he was the son of the hated wife. This son was to get the double portion that belonged to the first-born. 

If parents had a disobedient and rebellious son, then they had to bring him out before the elders of the city and denounce him as a glutton and a drunkard. The elders were then to stone him to death to remove the stain of evil from the community. 

If any man was hanged, his body was not to remain on the tree all night. He had to be buried that same day because a hanged body was cursed.  

If a man’s brother’s ox or sheep went astray, the man had to restore it to his brother as soon as possible. The same applied to other possessions. 

No woman or man was permitted to wear the clothes of the opposite sex. Cross-dressing was an abomination before God. 

When a house was built, there had to be a parapet around the roof so that if anyone fell from the roof no guilt should fall upon the householder. 

A man couldn’t plant two types of seed in his vineyard. No-one could plough with both an ox and an ass yoked together. A person could not wear a garment made from different materials. Tassels had to be placed on the four corners of a man’s vest/under-garments. 

If a man hated his new wife, and made an accusation that she wasn’t a virgin on her marriage night, the woman’s parents had to present evidence of her virginity to the elders – a blood-stained cloth.  The accuser would then be reprimanded by the elders of the city, and fined a hundred shekels of silver that was payable to the bride’s father. And she would continue to be the man’s wife and he would never be allowed to divorce her. But if the woman was found not to have been a virgin, then she was to be stoned to death at the door of her father’s house. 

If a virgin was betrothed to be married, but slept with another man from the city, then both were to be brought to the gate of the city and stoned to death. But if a man found a woman in the fields and raped her, only he would be put to death. The woman was to be regarded in the same way as a victim of murder – no sin could be laid at her door. If a man slept with a woman that was not engaged, then he had to pay the woman’s father fifty shekels of silver and take her as his wife. He was not permitted ever to divorce her. 

No man was permitted to sleep with his father’s wife. A man whose testicles had been crushed or his penis cut off could not enter the assembly of the Lord. Neither could a bastard nor his offspring for ten generations.  

Any man who was unclean owing to a nocturnal omission had to leave the camp. He could return at sunset after he had washed himself. A person who wanted to relieve himself had to go outside the camp and then cover up his excrement after digging a hole with an implement. There could be no unclean thing within the camp since God walked there. 

If a slave took refuge with a person, that person was not to return him to his master. Instead, the man taking refuge could live among his protector’s people, wherever he chose, and was not to be oppressed. 

There were to be no temple prostitutes or sodomites within the community.   

No-one was allowed to charge a fellow Israelite interest, but one was permitted to charge a stranger interest. 

When a man became displeased with his wife on account of finding something indecent about her, he was permitted to give her a certificate of divorce and send her from his house. She was then able to become another man’s wife. And if that second man divorced her, or died, she was not allowed to return to her first husband. 

A newly married man was exempt from military service for a year and could not be charged with any other business. His duty was to stay at home and keep his new wife happy. 

Any man who kidnapped a fellow Israelite, enslaving him or selling him, had to be put to death once the matter was discovered. 

In the event of a leprosy outbreak, the people were to follow the instructions of the Levites religiously.  

When a man made a loan to a neighbour, he was not permitted to enter the man’s house to get the item being offering as a pledge. If the neighbour was poor and offered a cloak, or some such garment, the man receiving the pledge was not to sleep in it. Rather, he was to return it before sunset so that the neighbour could sleep in it.  

No-one was allowed to oppress a hired servant, be he a fellow Israelite or a foreigner. His wages were to be paid before sunset because he was counting on the money. 

Parents could not be put to death for the sins of their children, nor children for the sins of their parents. Each person was accountable for their own wrongdoings. Justice was due to both aliens and orphans. 

Bundles of wheat forgotten in a harvested field had to be left there for foreigners, orphans and widows.  

The people were reminded that they had been slaves in Egypt and were therefore obliged to be kind and considerate to others in positions of weakness or need. 

If any case between disputing parties came to court, the innocent person had to be acquitted and the guilty party condemned. If the guilty party deserved a beating, the judge had to get him to lie down and be beaten in his presence. The number of lashes had to be appropriate to the offence. No more than forty lashes were permitted.  

If two brothers were sharing a property and one of them died without a son, his widow was not to be married to anyone outside the family. Her husband’s brother had to marry her and perform his late brother’s duties. The first son the woman had was to take the name of the dead brother so that his name would be carried on among the people of Israel. 

If a man did not want to marry his late brother’s wife, the woman was to bring the matter before the elders at the town gate and say, “My husband’s brother refuses to carry on his late brother’s name and refuses to fulfil his duties towards me.” The elders of the town would then call him before them. If he persisted in his refusal, the brother’s widow was to go up to him in the presence of the elders, pull off one of his sandals and spit in his face, saying, “This is what happens to a man who refuses to continue his brother’s lineage.” The man’s family would be known as the “family of a man without a sandal”. 

If two men fought and the wife of one came to help, and grabbed the other man’s genitals, her hand then had to be cut off. No pity was to be shown to her. 

 

Commentary on the 49th parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: OK, well, let’s look at some inconsistencies here before we get to the silliness, the capriciousness, the unfairness and. the downright evil.

MS: Thank you for the respect you show God’s word.

SAS: For one thing, it’s not god’s word. It’s an interpretation, rehash and low fidelity message from Moses, at best. Methuselah, bastards and their offspring for ten generations are not allowed to enter the Assembly. Am I correct?

MS: You are. What of it?

SAS: But fathers must not be punished for the crimes of their sons, and sons are not allowed to be punished for the crimes of their fathers. Is that correct?

MS: It is. I think that’s eminently reasonable. Surely you agree?

SAS: I agree. But bastards -- Can we agree to use another term?—and their descendants have to be punished for ten generations? What did these poor bastards do?

MS: The man who impregnated a woman outside of wedlock committed an abomination against the Lord. And the woman is lucky she was not stoned to death.

SAS: And the man didn’t have to take responsibility either. So the woman is shunned and humiliated and for ten generations the descendants are regarded as second-class citizens. I don’t like it, Methuselah.

MS: No-one really cares about what you like or not, actually. The point is that God expressly ordered that lewdness among the Israelites was forbidden. Bastards are an offence against the word of God.

SAS: What rubbish! The so-called abomination offended the institutional structure. Why must the descendants be punished? Why not the man and woman involved?

MS: Imagine if everybody did it. What would the world come to?

SAS: Oh, I can. The world would stay pretty much the same. Some people like being married, some don’t. Some women want to have children, with or without a husband.  What’s your big objection?

MS: My objection? Who will care for the children? Who will care for the women? Who will pass on the laws of God? The entire community would fall to pieces without this structure. Each of these rules has to be followed to the letter, or else this community will perish.

SAS: Well, that might not be such a bad thing. It couldn’t have been much fun to be a woman in those days. You talk of fairness! The complete disparity between the treatment of men and woman in your society is evident here, Methuselah.  Boy, is it a man’s world!

MS: You attack this passage for that! How ironic! It is laden with examples of how women’s rights were protected!

SAS: Well, they were protected because they were men’s property. And this lot love property rights, don’t they? Look at the business of a man having to marry his dead brother’s wife. The man’s first wife must have loved that. And the brother’s wife hardly had a choice. Accept it or be chased out of the community. And the man himself, the sandalless one? How must he have felt if he didn’t like his sister-in-law? How does everyone get to deserve this situation which none of them has done anything to bring about?

MS: How many times do I have to explain to you that these rules were designed to keep the community together and strong? Survival was crucial.

SAS: How does not mixing wool and linen in one garment keep the community strong and united?

MS: It’s a system, Sigmund!! It is a whole package. Imagine for a moment that every person in the community abided by these rules. Would there be problems? Would people suffer? Would the community be weaker or stronger?

SAS: I can see I’m talking to someone who thinks the solution to an independent free thinking society is death by stoning.

MS: Sigmund, it is the principle of fairness and rectitude, of the greater good and of more protection for everyone. No-one is left out, no-one is hungry. Don’t you understand that?

SAS: So, what’s the big objection to cross-dressing? Why should it be up there with rape?

MS: Don’t even start with your nonsense now. It is against the laws of God and the laws of nature.

SAS: What’s nature got to do with clothes? Why on earth do you think that god would care how people dressed, or if people were attracted to their own sex? Why shouldn’t your holy men love other holy men just like them? The whole basis of your cult seems to be to eschew difference and embrace only your own, in any event. It seems to me that it follows that men are tacitly encouraged to love those who are just like them. The laws hardly encourage the men of Israel to think of women as people just like themselves. And don’t ask me for details. They’re all there in the passage!

 MS: You’re a very dangerous, possibly unbalanced man. I hope you can keep these crazy opinions to yourself.

SAS: Tolerance, Methuselah, I have given you the benefit of the doubt. I’m prepared to entertain the idea of this fiction of yours as though it were real. I think you owe me the courtesy of listening to my opinions too.

  

History 

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

The Second Intifada (2000 – 2005): Part Two 

The Taba Summit in January 2001 failed to produce a peaceful settlement between Israel and the PLO. Arafat and Barak wouldn’t get another chance to negotiate a settlement – Barak was defeated in February’s election and Ariel Sharon became Prime Minister. Sharon made it clear that he wasn’t prepared to meet Arafat.

In May 2001 Israel intercepted the vessel Santorini that was carrying weapons to the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. Israel’s response was swift. Warplanes attacked security force targets in the territories and 12 Palestinians were killed.

This tit-for-tat world was rocked a short while later when a suicide bomber blew himself up in a Tel Aviv club, killing 21 Israelis. Most were high school students. When another weapons-laden boat, the Karine A, was captured in January 2002, Israel suspected Arafat’s involvement.

A number of suicide bombings followed, including the Passover Massacre in Netanya. Israel launched Operation Defense Shield which killed 497 Palestinians, according to the UN. During this Operation, the Battle of Jenin was waged for just over a week in a Palestinian refugee camp.  The United Nations rejected Palestinian claims that the Israelis had conducted a massacre at Jenin, but Amnesty International concluded that members of the IDF had committed war crimes. The official Palestinian death toll was placed at 52, with IDF losses assessed at a similar level.

In April and May, a 38-day standoff occurred in Bethlehem where Palestinian militants and civilians took refuge inside a church. Israeli snipers killed seven of those inside. The siege ended with the deportation of 13 militants said to be terrorists from Europe.

A dramatic development took place at the start of 2003. Israeli intelligence produced documentary evidence that Arafat had contributed $20,000 to al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigades. The USA immediately demanded democratic reforms in the Palestinian Authority and demanded that a prime minister independent of Arafat be appointed. Under pressure, Arafat appointed Mahmoud Abbas as PM. At this point the USA pushed hard for the implementation of the “road map” for peace that had been drawn up by the USA itself, Russia, the European Union and the United Nations. The “road map” involved three phases: firstly, an end to Palestinian violence, an Israeli withdrawal from Palestinian cities and no more settlement expansion; secondly, an international conference to support Palestinian economic recovery and then a progression towards a Palestinian state; finally, a second conference where final borders would be agreed and peace deals with Israel established.

The plan encountered problems from the start. While Israel released 100 Palestinian prisoners in June as a sign of good faith, Ariel Sharon would not commit to a settlement freeze which he believed was impossible to implement. After attempts at shuttle diplomacy by US president George W. Bush, Palestinians resumed attacks against Israel and Israel responded by attacking Hamas in Gaza with the help of helicopter gunships.

By the end of June, the Palestinian Authority, Islamic Jihad, Hamas and Fatah all declared a truce and Israel left northern Gaza. The peace push was back on. On 1 July 2003, Sharon and Abbas met in Jerusalem and committed themselves to the “road map”. The USA announced a $30 million aid package to the Palestinian Authority for infrastructural rebuilding. The situation imploded, however, and Israel and Hamas were soon fighting again. Israeli forces managed to kill a few high-ranking leaders of Hamas and Islamic Jihad. Israel was then rocked by the Jerusalem bus 2 massacre in which 23 people were killed and 136 wounded.

Israeli forces  killed or captured the perpetrators.

Abbas resigned in September 2003 and was replaced by Ahmed Qurei.

Israel started building the Israeli West Bank barrier. The stated aim was to prevent Palestinian terrorists from entering Israeli cities. However, On October 4, a suicide bombing in a Haifa restaurant killed 21 Israelis.

By the end of 2003, Israel had not yet withdrawn from Palestinian areas occupied since September 2000 and settlement expansion had not been frozen. Terrorism continued. The road map looked like a dead end.

2004 saw Israeli forces operating mainly in Rafah in Gaza. Operation Rainbow was aimed at destroying tunnels used for smuggling as well as stopping weapons shipments. The operation was denounced by many in the media following the deaths of civilians, including protestors.

Operation Days of Penitence was launched in late September following more Qassam rocket attacks on Israel. More than 100 Palestinians were killed. Of the 42 non-combatants killed, more than 20 were said to be children.

On 11 November, Yasser Arafat died in Paris. Hamas vowed to continue its attacks while Mahmoud Abbas tried to unite Palestinian factions and broker peace. Early in 2005, Abbas was elected president of the Palestinian Authority. He campaigned on a platform of peaceful negotiations with Israel. Ariel Sharon, however, froze diplomatic contact and said Abbas needed to stop the terror strikes.

Abbas tried by sending Palestinian police into northern Gaza and managing to reduce significantly the number of Qassam rocket attacks.

On 8 February 2005, Abbas and Sharon met at a four-way summit that included Jordan and Egypt, and announced a truce. Sharon released 900 Palestinian prisoners and withdrew forces from West Bank towns. The truce was only partially successful, with Hamas and Islamic Jihad prominent in ongoing actions against Israel.

In early 2006, Hamas won a big majority in the Palestinian Legislative Council. It announced that it was recommencing attacks on Israel. It refused to recognize Israel’s right to exist and declared the Holocaust a Jewish conspiracy. The West immediately imposed sanctions against the Hamas-led Palestinians, starving them of foreign aid.

The Gaza-Israeli conflict that ensued is generally considered separately from the Second Intifada, which ended thanks to 2005’s peace initiatives.

 

Here follows a discussion on this historical segment by Dad, Chaya and Ben. 

CHAYA: It seems a little arbitrary to say that the Second Intifada ended in 2005 when it was business as usual in Gaza. I guess, however, that Israel’s war with Hamas has opened up a separate chapter in the ongoing war.

DAD: There are many ways to slice and dice this period of recent history, Chaya. Some people even say the Second Intifada hasn’t ended yet. I think they’re wrong in the sense that an Intifada is, by its very nature, an “uprising” and uprisings only have a few years of momentum in them. I do think that Hamas’ victory in 2006 signaled a new phase in the Middle East conflict. Hamas rejected negotiation and made it clear that it would accept nothing except the destruction of the Jewish state.

CHAYA: So, I suppose Israel and the USA should try to polarize Hamas and Fatah, and forge a solution with Fatah, these days the more moderate Palestinians.

DAD: They haven’t needed to polarize them – they have been doing it themselves. There has been a so-called Conflict of Brothers between them since 2006 and it hasn’t been very brotherly. That’s why it’s also called Wakseh by Palestinians, which means “humiliation” or “collapse”.

CHAYA: It’s certainly humiliating for them to splinter like they have, and not present a united front to Israel, USA and the world. It’s hugely advantageous for Israel, though. Internal rivalry makes the Palestinians weaker. Plus, the Israeli government has a unique chance to broker a settlement with Fatah that excludes Hamas. That would place Hamas in a very difficult position – if it stayed outside of a settlement it would appear more than ever like a terrorist organization that was impervious to any peace deal.

DAD: Well, a terrorist organization is basically what it is, in my opinion.

BEN: I’ve read that the USA provided funds, weapons and training for Fatah after that 2006 election, and more than 700 Palestinians were killed in internal fights during the next 18 months.

DAD: That’s right, Ben. It is estimated that 118 were killed at the Battle of Gaza in which Hamas won control of the Gaza Strip in June 2007. Fatah holds sway on the West Bank. Both groups operate in each other’s strongholds though. Governments in both regions regularly round up and detain each other’s supporters.

BEN: What does Fatah want to achieve, exactly?

DAD: As I understand it, it wants to see a Palestinian state set up in the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem. They don’t want such a state to be established on just any terms. In spite of their more moderate position, Fatah’s constitution calls for the “complete liberation of Palestine”. The Israeli government would have to make dramatic concessions before Fatah signed up to a two-state solution. A lot of fancy tap dancing would have to be done.

BEN: I saw that in December 2009, when Israeli deputy foreign minister Danny Ayalon was making peace overtures to all Israel’s Arab neighbors, Palestinian Authority officials decided to look at ways of starting a third Intifada!

DAD: I saw that. “The resistance to Israel continues,” said Fatah.

CHAYA: Well that doesn’t sound very hopeful!

BEN: So much for your idea of Israel hammering out a quick deal with that “nice” Fatah and sidelining the “evil” Hamas in the renegade state of Gaza. 

DAD:  A key difference is that Fatah is not currently recognized as a terrorist organization by any government while Hamas is viewed as one by the West.

BEN: In real terms, though, I think they’re cut from the same cloth. At the end of the day the “Brothers” in Hamas and Fatah have much more in common than Fatah and the Israeli-Western peace lobby. 

CHAYA: Which means that everyone will continue to live on a knife edge. The tragic thing is that life in Jerusalem and Israel has a pulse and vibrancy that is compelling and exotic. Yet with it comes this eternal threat of violence and the need to send young people into battle. 

DAD: I’m a secular person, but when it comes to the Israeli-Palestinian problem, I’m tempted to throw up my hands and say, “God, only you can fix this mess!” 

BEN: God has entered the building? It’s time to eat.  

 

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        The world is beautiful, shining bright, and easy – but for whom?

·        To have money is not always so Ai-yi-yi, but not to have it is Oy-oy-oy!

·        It was hard for Satan alone to mislead the world, so he appointed rabbis in different places (Nachman of Bratslav)

·        Worms eat you when you’re dead; worries eat you up alive

·        Let bunions grow on his bunions, and on his carbuncles – boils.

 

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Maxim Litvinov (1876-1951) 

Born Meir Henoch Mojszewicz Wallach-Finkelstein in Bialystok in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, he joined the Russian Social Democratic Labor party in 1898 and adopted the pseudonym of Maxim Litvinov. In 1900 he became a member of the Kiev party committee and was arrested along with other committee members in 1901. He escaped and fled to Switzerland where he became editor of the revolutionary newspaper Iskra. He joined the Bolsheviks in 1903 and returned to Russia. Following the 1905 revolution he became editor of the SDLP newspaper New Life. He fled Russia again in 1906 and spent the next 10 years in London. After 1917’s October Revolution, Lenin appointed Litvinov the Soviet government’s representative in Britain. Arrested in 1918, he was swapped in a prisoner exchange and went back to Russia. In 1919 he published the book The Russian Revolution: Its Rise and Meaning. He became a roving ambassador for Russia and negotiated several key agreements such as Litvinov’s Pact in 1929. In 1930 he was made Minister of Foreign Affairs by Stalin and in 1933 persuaded the USA to recognize the Soviet government. He went on to represent Russia in the League of Nations (1934-1938). On 3 May 1939 Stalin replaced him with Vyacheslav Molotov, and Jews in the ministry were purged. This opened the way for the ill-fated treaty with Hitler.  Litvinov was able to make a comeback as Deputy Commissar of Foreign Affairs, and he went on to become Ambassador to the United States from 1941 to 1943. He is recognized as the diplomat who most successfully normalized Russia’s relations with the world following its epoch-making revolution. 

 

Wassily Leontief (1905-1999) 

This Russian-Jewish economist and Nobel Prize winner was born in Munich and entered the University of Leningrad at 15. By 19 he had earned the equivalent of a Masters degree in Economics. A supporter of free speech and academic freedom, he was arrested several times by the Cheka. He was only allowed to leave Russia because he was believed to be suffering from a terminal case of sarcoma. He went to the University of Berlin where, in 1928, he was awarded a PhD in Economics. In 1932 Leontief joined the Department of Economics at Harvard, becoming Professor in 1946. He was one of the first researchers to use computers to create mathematical models for economic sectors. He set up the Harvard Economic Research Project in 1948 and directed it until 1973, the year in which he won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his work on input-output tables. In 1975 he moved to New York University where he founded and directed the Institute for Economic Analysis. He is most famous for his linear activity model of General Equilibrium and the resulting input-output analysis. 

 

Song 

 

We will now sing a traditional song to conclude our Shabbat celebration. You have a copy of the words, so please join in as we sing.

 

The song is sung

 

Farewell and an Invitation

 

Thank you for coming together to share our Shabbat. May you go out into the new week with renewed strength, confidence and happiness.

 

We now cordially invite you to join us for some coffee and cake.

 

 

 

HOW TO SING THE SONGS
ADON OLAM WORDS
Adon Olam David Solid Gould & The Temple Rockers
ALL MEN ARE BROTHERS
ALLE BRUDER SONG
ALLE BRIDER SONG
AL KOL ELEH WORDS
AL KOL ELEH
BASHANA words
BASHANA SONG
BEI MIR BIST DU SHEYN
BEI MIR BIST DU SCHEYN SONG
BMBDS song
CHIRIBIM WORDS
CHIRIBIM Song
DAYENU WORDS
DAYENU SONG ENGLISH
DAYENU SONG
DONNA DONNA
DONNA DONNA SONG
HALLELUYA
HALELUJA KARAOKE
HATIKVA
HATIKVA SONG
HATIKVA SONG
DAYENU
HATIKVA WORDS
HATIKVA SONG 1
HAVA NAGILA WORDS
HAVA NAGILA SONG
HAVA NAGILA KARAOKE
HAVEINU SHALOM ALEICHEM
HEVENU SHALOM ALEICHEM WORDS
HEVENU SHALOM ALECHEM SONG
HINEH MA TOV WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD KARAOKE IVRIT
JERUSALEM THE GOLD SONG
JERUSALEM THE GOLD JARAOKE
MAYIM MAYIM WORDS
MAYIM MAYIM DANCE
OIF'N PRIPITSCHOK song
OSE SHALOM
OSE SHALOM SONG
PAPI ROS'N
PAPIROS'N SONG
PARTISAN SONG 1
PARTISAN SONG
PARTISAN SONG MUSIC
RABBI ELIMELEKH
RABBI ELIMELEKH SONG
AS DER REBE SINGT
AS DER REBBE SINGT LEONARD COHEN
AS DER REBBE SINGT SONG
RAISINS WITH ALMONDS WORDS
SIMANTOV U MAZELTOV WORDS
SIMAN TOV MUSIC
MAZELTOV CLARINET
TUMBALALAIKA WORDS
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA 4
TZENA TZENA The Weavers
TZENA TZENA WORDS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
HATIKVA STREISAND
HATIKVA STREISAND
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
YO EN ESTANDO - SEPHARDIC
ELIYAHU SEPHARDIC
SEPHARDIC SONG
SEPHARDIC SONG 3
Sholem Aleichem Susan Allen
Shalom Aleichem Susan Allen
OTHER VERSIONS OF SONGS
DUVID CROCKET WORDS
DUVID CROCKET MICKEY KATZ
MODERN PASSOVER SONGS
This will help you find yourself]