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June 25  SHORT VERSION 

Challah dips wine drinks candles

 

SINGING

Mass action draws mass punishment  

a.k.a Parshat Korah (Numbers 16:1-18:32) 

 

Then a fire went out from God and it consumed the two hundred and fifty men of Korah's followers who had offered the incense.

 

And then God instructed Moses to tell Eleazar, the son of Aaron, to collect the censers and hammer them into plates as a reminder to the people that no outsider, no person who is not of the seed of Aaron, shall ever approach to burn incense before the Lord.

 

The next day, the whole of the community railed against Moses and Aaron, complaining, "You two have killed the Lord's people."

 

Then the Presence of the Lord appeared from the cloud. God said to Moses and Aaron, "Remove yourselves from these people so that I may consume them in an instant."

 

The people fell on their faces hit by a plague sent by God, and Moses quickly sent Aaron to perform an incense ritual of atonement for all the people, because the wrath of God had descended upon the people. Aaron stationed himself between the dead and the living and the plague was checked. Over fourteen thousand seven hundred people died, in addition to those killed with Korah.

SINGING

Commentary

 

SAS: I say nothing. The facts of history stand against your argument. Let’s go back to Aaron, God’s other pet. Why is he the flavour of the Parsha?

MS: Aaron is God’s priest. He is the patriarch of the priestly caste. Their lives are to be different from those of the rest of the people. They are God’s servants. Aaron has shown himself to be brave and worthy. He too did not seek this status.

SAS: It doesn’t answer my question, but that doesn’t matter. It looks to me like Aaron is God’s personal butler. The Levites have been taken into service, and they derive their power from their master. I suppose Moses is God’s chief of staff, and he certainly suffers burns and injuries from being that close to power. Which part of this scenario is supposed to characterise the Jews being led from slavery to freedom?

MS: Sigmund, has it occurred to you that people need a stern, firm hand to protect and guide them? And that God is concerned to lead these people out of the wilderness? Those who don’t want to go are left behind.

SAS: That’s a way of putting it, my friend. You will never convince me that God killing his people, or allowing them to die, is proof of his love for them.

MS: I don’t think that God needs me to convince you.

SINGING

 

History

Jews Leave Arab Countries En Masse 

 

In the 20th century roughly 900,000 Jews left Arab countries where they had been living. There were two main reasons for this exodus – the attraction of Zionism and the chance to live in Israel or the West was one, and the other was their effective expulsion from countries antagonistic to Jews.

Jews had lived in the 25 Arabic-speaking countries for ages, in some cases for millennia, as well as in the non-Arab countries of Iran and Turkey (some 200,000 Jews lived in these two countries).

Departures increased after 1948 following the Arab-Israeli War.

Israel absorbed some 680,000 Jews who left Arab countries. They and their offspring today comprise 40% of Israel’s population.

The World Organization of Jews from Arab Countries estimates that Jewish property abandoned in Arab countries was worth more than US $ 300 billion. It claims the departures were a result of a deliberate policy by the Arab league.

SINGING

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        Eat a third and drink a third, but leave the remaining third of your stomach empty: for then, if anger overtakes you, there will be room for your rage. (Talmud)

·        If a Jew breaks a leg, he thanks God he did not break both legs; if he breaks both legs, he thanks God he did not break his neck.

·        There is no truer index to intelligence than the way one acts at the table. (Ibn Gabirol)

·        What is called happiness in its narrowest sense comes from the satisfaction – most often instantaneous – of pent-up needs which have reached great intensity, and by its very nature can only be a transitory experience. (Sigmund Freud)

·        I am at two with nature. (Woody Allen)

SINGING

 

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Dr. Paul Ehrlich (1854-1915) 

This Nobel Prize winner was born into a Jewish family in Silesia. He studied medicine at the University of Leipzig and went on to join the Institute for Infectious Diseases in Berlin. He developed the famous side-chain theory which explained the effects of serum on the body. In 1897 Ehrlich was appointed Public Health Officer at Frankfurt-am-Main. In 1899 he became the director of the Royal Institute of Experimental Therapy at Frankfurt. He was a joint recipient (with Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov) of the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1908 as a result of his work in the field of immunology. In 1909 he and a student, Sahachiro Hata, developed Salvarsan, a treatment for syphilis. This cure became known as Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet. In 1940, a film of his life called Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet was released. It was directed by William Dieterle and starred Edward G. Robinson in the title role. Dr. Ehrlich is also noted for his work in autoimmunity, for coining the term “chemotherapy”, and for his pioneering work on the blood-brain barrier. 

 

LONG VERSION 

a.k.a Parshat Korah (Numbers 16:1-18:32) 

 

Now, Korah, who was of the tribe of Levi, together with two of the sons of Eliab, decided to rise up against Moses supported by two hundred and fifty leaders of the people. They came to Moses and Aaron, and said, "You've gone too far and taken too much upon yourselves. Why do you raise yourself up above us?"

 

When Moses heard this, he fell on his face, saying to Korah and his followers, "Wait until the morning, then God will make known to us who God is and who is holy." Then Moses added, "You have gone too far, sons of Levi. Is it not enough that God has set you apart from the community of Israel by having you perform the duties of the Lord's Dwelling Place? Will you seek priesthood too? Truly, you rebel against God."

 

Moses sent for the two sons of Eliab, but they would not come, saying it was unfair that Moses made himself superior to them and was forcing them to die by wandering in the wilderness. Moses then instructed Korah and his followers to make a fire in the censers and bring incense offerings to God.

 

At the entrance to the Tent of Appointed Meeting, Moses and Aaron gathered in front of the rebels and the rest of the people.  Then the Presence of the Lord appeared to the entire assembly. The Lord said to Moses and Aaron, "Stand back from these rebels so that I may destroy them in an instant!" And Moses and Aaron fell upon their faces and said: "O God, God of the spirits of all flesh! If one man sins, will your wrath be upon the entire community?"

 

God then instructed Moses to say to the community, "Remove yourselves from Korah and the sons of Eliab. Move away from these wicked men and touch nothing that belongs to them, lest you be wiped out for all their sins." So the people moved away from the rebels.

 

Then Moses said, "By what is about to happen, you shall know it is the Lord who sent me and not something I have devised of my own accord. If these men die like all men normally do, then it was not the Lord who sent me. But if the Lord creates a phenomenon so that the ground opens its mouth wide and swallows them and their property and they go to the grave alive, then you will know that these people have provoked God."

 

When Moses finished speaking the earth under Korah, the sons of Eliab and their followers split, and the earth opened its mouth and swallowed them and their houses and all of their property. They and their belongings went down into the grave alive and the earth closed over them and they vanished. All of the people who were watching fled, lest the earth swallow them, too.

 

Then a fire went out from God and it consumed the two hundred and fifty men of Korah's followers who had offered the incense.

 

And then God instructed Moses to tell Eleazar, the son of Aaron, to collect the censers and hammer them into plates as a reminder to the people that no outsider, no person who is not of the seed of Aaron, shall ever approach to burn incense before the Lord.

 

The next day, the whole of the community railed against Moses and Aaron, complaining, "You two have killed the Lord's people."

 

Then the Presence of the Lord appeared from the cloud. God said to Moses and Aaron, "Remove yourselves from these people so that I may consume them in an instant."

 

The people fell on their faces hit by a plague sent by God, and Moses quickly sent Aaron to perform an incense ritual of atonement for all the people, because the wrath of God had descended upon the people. Aaron stationed himself between the dead and the living and the plague was checked. Over fourteen thousand seven hundred people died, in addition to those killed with Korah.

 

Then God instructed Moses to get the chieftains of the twelve tribes each to inscribe a staff with the name of the tribe. The rods were then put before God at the Tent of Appointed Meeting in front of the Ten Commandments.

 

God said, "The staff of the man whom I choose shall sprout." And the next day, Aaron's rod sprouted with blossoms and almonds. Moses took out all the rods to show the people. Then God told Moses to leave Aaron's rod in front of the Sanctuary as a sign for those who considered rebelling against the Lord’s wishes. Those who complained against the Lord should understand that they would be killed.

 

Suddenly, the people were scared that everyone who went near to the sanctuary was doomed to be killed. They were terrified to be near the Presence of the Lord.

 

The Lord said to Aaron, "You and your sons shall be the priests. You shall take charge of the altar and partake of all the sacred offerings. All that the people bring to God shall be yours including the best oils and the first fruits, but the first-born male and all the unclean animals must be redeemed according to value. You shall have all these sacred gifts that are set aside for the Lord, but you shall have no share of the land. I am your portion and your share among the people.

 

 

 

God spoke more to Aaron: "The sons of Levi shall have the tithe as their inheritance for the work that they do in the Sanctuary. The Children of Israel shall not approach the Tent of Appointed Meeting as this would result in their deaths. Only you and your sons may do so. You shall take one-tenth of all the tithes as a gift to the Lord. This shall be for the Lord. You shall take the choicest portions for the Lord and the rest you may have. Do not profane the sacred donations of the children of Israel lest you die."

 

Commentary on the 38th parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: Methuselah, so the Jews are a class-based society? Not all equal in the eyes of the Lord? That’s unfair.

MS: This is not a case of class, it is a case of certain jobs and responsibility being reserved for certain parts of the community. Although the priests were able to partake of the finest sacrifices, note that they were not to share in the land. So, whereas they had certain privileges, they had great responsibilities and, additionally, were not to be possessors of land.

SAS:  It sounds like they were given danger pay as a result of all the fire-power they had to face each time they entered the sanctuary and came near to God in a bad mood.

MS: As I have come to expect, your lack of respect leads you to the wrong assumptions and silly conclusions. Let me explain this to you. The Levites were set apart to perform sacred duties in the Dwelling Place of the Lord. Korah and his followers wanted more; they resented the authority assumed by Moses and Aaron. They did not understand that Moses and Aaron had been given these responsibilities by God. They also wanted this status. By the end of the Parsha, Aaron’s status is further elevated, and the other Levites’ place in the Holy Tent is delineated. Their rights and responsibilities are clear.

SAS:  You mean they know who’s boss. As I understand it, there was an attempted coup here. Some members of the tribe of Levi thought that others, that is Moses and Aaron, were too big for their boots. So they took them on. And according to the story, you don’t mess with God’s chosen boys. God showed what he could do if anyone challenged his decisions. I note that the Lord destroyed the rebels’ houses. I didn’t realise that these wandering tribes had houses.

MS: You always focus on the details instead of the substance. The Lord destroyed them and everything associated with them. As for God’s punishment – it served the purpose of eliminating the rebels and providing a demonstration of God’s power.

SAS: Are you saying, though, that God has an anger management problem? Moses had to reason with him not to wipe out the whole lot who had accompanied Korah. God was going to do it, no doubt about it. It was Moses who calmed him down, and talked him out of mass punishment. This is not a godly way to behave.

MS: You would know about godly ways. Moses, as he often did, interceded for the people, begging God for mercy. It is a tribute to how highly God valued him that he considered his entreaties.

SAS: It’s interesting that God did manage to kill about fourteen thousand people by sending a plague down on them as soon as he saw that the people were angered and upset by the death of the rebels. So, he might have spared some of the rebels, but he was not in a joking mood when it came to any show of disobedience and insubordination. God has no problem killing his people.

MS: God metes out punishment to those who question his word or challenge his chosen servants. Would you have him not protect his chosen leaders? He shows the people that Moses is his mouthpiece, and when they challenge Moses, they are challenging him.

SAS: And he can look after himself, clearly. What’s the point? How can we say that the Children of Israel are his chosen people if he wipes them out at will if they annoy him?

MS: Sigmund, he is God. We can’t begin to understand his motives. We must have faith that he cares for his people and does what is in their best interests.

SAS: I say nothing. The facts of history stand against your argument. Let’s go back to Aaron, God’s other pet. Why is he the flavour of the Parsha?

MS: Aaron is God’s priest. He is the patriarch of the priestly caste. Their lives are to be different from those of the rest of the people. They are God’s servants. Aaron has shown himself to be brave and worthy. He too did not seek this status.

SAS: It doesn’t answer my question, but that doesn’t matter. It looks to me like Aaron is God’s personal butler. The Levites have been taken into service, and they derive their power from their master. I suppose Moses is God’s chief of staff, and he certainly suffers burns and injuries from being that close to power. Which part of this scenario is supposed to characterise the Jews being led from slavery to freedom?

MS: Sigmund, has it occurred to you that people need a stern, firm hand to protect and guide them? And that God is concerned to lead these people out of the wilderness? Those who don’t want to go are left behind.

SAS: That’s a way of putting it, my friend. You will never convince me that God killing his people, or allowing them to die, is proof of his love for them.

MS: I don’t think that God needs me to convince you.

 

History 

 

The Parsha we have just read comes from the five books of Moses, the Torah. The dialogues between Sigmund Albert Spinoza and Methuselah Solomon are about the meaning of the Parsha.

 

What we know about Jewish History, however, is based in fact, and on historical records. 

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

Jews Leave Arab Countries En Masse 

 

In the 20th century roughly 900,000 Jews left Arab countries where they had been living. There were two main reasons for this exodus – the attraction of Zionism and the chance to live in Israel or the West was one, and the other was their effective expulsion from countries antagonistic to Jews.

Jews had lived in the 25 Arabic-speaking countries for ages, in some cases for millennia, as well as in the non-Arab countries of Iran and Turkey (some 200,000 Jews lived in these two countries).

Departures increased after 1948 following the Arab-Israeli War.

Israel absorbed some 680,000 Jews who left Arab countries. They and their offspring today comprise 40% of Israel’s population.

The World Organization of Jews from Arab Countries estimates that Jewish property abandoned in Arab countries was worth more than US $ 300 billion. It claims the departures were a result of a deliberate policy by the Arab league.

By the end of the Six Day War in 1967, Jewish communities in these countries were few and far between.  It is estimated that by 1991 only 16,000 Jews lived in Arab countries.

A number of advocacy groups represent the interests of such Jews. Lobbyists are pressing claims for rights and redress for these Jews on the basis that they were victims of human rights violations.

History reveals a series of human rights violations, whether planned or spontaneous. One example is the Farhud riots that erupted in Baghdad in 1941 which saw 180 Jews killed, Jewish businesses looted and houses destroyed.

After 1948, Iraq forbade Jewish immigration to prevent a strengthening of Israel, but pressure led to a change of this law.

A series of bombs along with legislation that made Zionist allegiance a felony led to most Jews signing up for emigration by 1951.By 1970 almost all Jews had left Iraq. In 1948, there had been 150,000 in the country.

In 1948, 105,000 Jews lived in Tunisia. Following anti-Jewish measures in 1956, and attacks against the Jewish population in 1967, 1982, 1985 and 2002, departures continued. Only a handful of Jews remain in the country today.

In 1948 there were 75,000 Jews in Egypt. Things turned ugly that year when 22 Jews died in a bomb blast and there were further deaths following attacks on the Cairo Synagogue and Jewish shops.

Further persecutions followed, as in 1956 during the Suez Crisis when 1000 Jews were arrested and 500 businesses seized by the state.

Amongst other outrages were the detention and torture of Jews in 1967.

Only 100 or so Jews remain in Cairo today. 

The story in Morocco is less severe, and even today Jewish schools and synagogues receive government subsidies. Still, in 2001, there were only about 5,000 Jews in Morocco where once 250,000 had lived.

Troubles there included anti-Jewish riots in 1948 in which 44 Jews were killed.

In 1956 Morocco became independent. Its identification with the Arab world increased and emigration to Israel was not permitted. Following a changing in the law in 1961, 70,000 Jews left the country over a three-year period. By 1967 only 50,000 remained.

This number halved by the early 70s and this small community then endured relatively few anti-Semitic attacks for a quarter of a century.

It remains to be seen whether advocacy groups will achieve any success in gaining restitution for Jewish refugees from Arab states.

It is noteworthy that some Jewish emigrants from Arab states resist the classification of refugee and state that their decision to leave was a free one based on a desire to embrace Zionism and Israeli citizenship.

   

Here follows a discussion on this historical segment by Dad, Chaya and Ben. 

 

BEN: It’s not surprising that Jews had to leave Arab countries, considering political developments in the 20th century. The way Jews were effectively hounded out of these countries and lost their possessions in the process is scandalous. Lobbyists should push hard for restitution.

CHAYA: They can push as hard as they like – nothing will happen. There is not the slightest chance that the Arab countries will take an historical view and recognise the rights of Jews in the lands they inhabited. They see these countries as theirs, and view the Jews who were there as trespassers.

DAD: Once the state of Israel was established in 1948, there was never going to be a modus vivendi between Arabs and Jews in Arab-speaking countries. Subsequent wars and intafadas have created a situation of extreme and insurmountable antagonism. So, no, we won’t be seeing any lump sums paid to Israel from the Arab states.

BEN: It certainly doesn’t help when some Jews get up and say, “I wasn’t a refugee – I chose to leave my country of birth because of Zionistic zeal.” Such statements undermine the case and let the Arab countries off Scot-free!

DAD: Perhaps they do, but a person must say what they want to say. I don’t blame Iraqi-born former Knesset member Ran Cohen for saying he wasn’t a refugee and that Zionism and the “pull of the land” motivated him. The truth is that Jews in most of the Arab countries could have stayed under certain conditions if they were prepared to accept the risks.

CHAYA: But, effectively, they had to leave if they wanted security, self-respect and a future for their families. I wonder whether those who say, “I wasn’t a refugee” aren’t just engaging in self-affirmation, and claiming that they were free agents because it makes them feel like lords of their own destiny. If they were more honest, they’d have to admit that they were given hardly a choice at all.

DAD: Well, if that’s the case I still don’t blame them for saying – and thinking – that they were choosing their own futures.

BEN: In a sense they did choose their futures because not every refugee had to choose Israel. I’ve read that many of the Moroccan refugees after the 1967 war chose to go to Spain, France, Belgium and Canada rather than Israel.

CHAYA: Yes, Ben, there was a degree of freedom in such choices, but they all still had to go somewhere – there was little choice about that.

DAD: And in many cases it was Israel or nowhere. The Israeli government organised large-scale rescue operations like Operations Ezra and Nehemiah in Iraq and Operation Magic Carpet in Yemen by which tens of thousands of Jews came to Israel. When dealing with what was called “whole community transfer”, you needed a place where whole communities could go and be fed immediately. In Israel, they had the ma’abarot, or transit camps, where people could live in tents until accommodated elsewhere in the country.

CHAYA: The concept of “whole community transfer” gives the lie to any notion of free choice. The Jews were, for all practical purposes, forced out of the Arab lands. Good on those who left enthusiastically in a state of Zionistic fervour! But let them not pretend that they chose their destinies.

BEN: The good thing is that as citizens of Israel they can now help to shape the future of their children’s and grandchildren’s lives.

 

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humour, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        Eat a third and drink a third, but leave the remaining third of your stomach empty: for then, if anger overtakes you, there will be room for your rage. (Talmud)

·        If a Jew breaks a leg, he thanks God he did not break both legs; if he breaks both legs, he thanks God he did not break his neck.

·        There is no truer index to intelligence than the way one acts at the table. (Ibn Gabirol)

·        What is called happiness in its narrowest sense comes from the satisfaction – most often instantaneous – of pent-up needs which have reached great intensity, and by its very nature can only be a transitory experience. (Sigmund Freud)

·        I am at two with nature. (Woody Allen)

 

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Dr. Paul Ehrlich (1854-1915) 

This Nobel Prize winner was born into a Jewish family in Silesia. He studied medicine at the University of Leipzig and went on to join the Institute for Infectious Diseases in Berlin. He developed the famous side-chain theory which explained the effects of serum on the body. In 1897 Ehrlich was appointed Public Health Officer at Frankfurt-am-Main. In 1899 he became the director of the Royal Institute of Experimental Therapy at Frankfurt. He was a joint recipient (with Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov) of the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1908 as a result of his work in the field of immunology. In 1909 he and a student, Sahachiro Hata, developed Salvarsan, a treatment for syphilis. This cure became known as Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet. In 1940, a film of his life called Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet was released. It was directed by William Dieterle and starred Edward G. Robinson in the title role. Dr. Ehrlich is also noted for his work in autoimmunity, for coining the term “chemotherapy”, and for his pioneering work on the blood-brain barrier. 

 

 

We will now sing a traditional song to conclude our Shabbat celebration. You have a copy of the words, so please join in as we sing.

 

The song is sung

 

Farewell and an Invitation

 

Thank you for coming together to share our Shabbat. May you go out into the new week with renewed strength, confidence and happiness.

 

We now cordially invite you to join us for some coffee and cake.

 

HOW TO SING THE SONGS
ADON OLAM WORDS
Adon Olam David Solid Gould & The Temple Rockers
ALL MEN ARE BROTHERS
ALLE BRUDER SONG
ALLE BRIDER SONG
AL KOL ELEH WORDS
AL KOL ELEH
BASHANA words
BASHANA SONG
BEI MIR BIST DU SHEYN
BEI MIR BIST DU SCHEYN SONG
BMBDS song
CHIRIBIM WORDS
CHIRIBIM Song
DAYENU WORDS
DAYENU SONG ENGLISH
DAYENU SONG
DONNA DONNA
DONNA DONNA SONG
HALLELUYA
HALELUJA KARAOKE
HATIKVA
HATIKVA SONG
HATIKVA SONG
DAYENU
HATIKVA WORDS
HATIKVA SONG 1
HAVA NAGILA WORDS
HAVA NAGILA SONG
HAVA NAGILA KARAOKE
HAVEINU SHALOM ALEICHEM
HEVENU SHALOM ALEICHEM WORDS
HEVENU SHALOM ALECHEM SONG
HINEH MA TOV WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD KARAOKE IVRIT
JERUSALEM THE GOLD SONG
JERUSALEM THE GOLD JARAOKE
MAYIM MAYIM WORDS
MAYIM MAYIM DANCE
OIF'N PRIPITSCHOK song
OSE SHALOM
OSE SHALOM SONG
PAPI ROS'N
PAPIROS'N SONG
PARTISAN SONG 1
PARTISAN SONG
PARTISAN SONG MUSIC
RABBI ELIMELEKH
RABBI ELIMELEKH SONG
AS DER REBE SINGT
AS DER REBBE SINGT LEONARD COHEN
AS DER REBBE SINGT SONG
RAISINS WITH ALMONDS WORDS
SIMANTOV U MAZELTOV WORDS
SIMAN TOV MUSIC
MAZELTOV CLARINET
TUMBALALAIKA WORDS
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA 4
TZENA TZENA The Weavers
TZENA TZENA WORDS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
HATIKVA STREISAND
HATIKVA STREISAND
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
YO EN ESTANDO - SEPHARDIC
ELIYAHU SEPHARDIC
SEPHARDIC SONG
SEPHARDIC SONG 3
Sholem Aleichem Susan Allen
Shalom Aleichem Susan Allen
OTHER VERSIONS OF SONGS
DUVID CROCKET WORDS
DUVID CROCKET MICKEY KATZ
MODERN PASSOVER SONGS
This will help you find yourself]