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June 18 Death to the Dissenters  

 

SHORT VERSION

Challah dips wine drinks candles

 

SINGING

 

God told Moses that He had given Canaan to the people of Israel. He instructed Moses to send out spies to take the lie of the land – a leader from each tribe.  Moses duly selected the men, one of whom was Joshua, from the tribe of Ephraim.

Moses sent the men through the Negev and up into the hill country. They were to ascertain whether the land was fertile and whether the cities were camps or strongholds. They were also to bring back fruit from the land.

SINGING

 

Commentary between Methusaleh Solomon and Sigmund Albert Spinoza

MS: The Land was given to our people by God. That is the overriding principle.

SAS: When you refer to “our people”, do you include women in that description? I assume they were present during these events, although one would hardly guess it. The omission of women from your text makes it sexist, although you’re only following the example of your God, who clearly isn’t interested in women’s contribution to society either.

 

SINGING

History 

The Expulsion of Jews from Muslim Countries 

 

While it is technically more accurate to speak of the exodus of Jews from Muslim countries rather than their expulsion, it is fair to say that after the Arab-Israeli War of 1948 Jews were more or less forced to flee Egypt, Morocco, Yemen, Tunisia, Lebanon, Algeria, Syria, Bahrain and Iraq. Governments and other citizens made life untenable and unsafe for its Jewish residents. Departure became necessary to ensure survival. In Iraq, parliament passed the Ordinance for the Cancellation of Iraqi Nationality for Jews in 1950, and then legalized the confiscation of Jewish property in 1951 while making Zionist affiliation a crime. This constituted an effective expulsion of Jews.

SINGING

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        God gave me such a good brain that in one minute I can worry more than others do in a year.

·        From dust we come and to dust we return but in between let’s have a blintz.

·        It’s no disgrace to be poor – which is the only good thing to say about it.

·        If you lend someone five dollars and he avoids you, you’ve gotten off cheap.

·        Look at Jewish history. Unrelieved lamenting would be intolerable. So, for every ten Jews beating their breasts, God designated one to be crazy and amuse the breast beaters. By the time I was five I knew I was that one.  (Mel Brooks) 

 

SINGING

Great Lives

Herbert Louis Samuel (1870-1963) 

 

First Viscount of Mount Carmel and Toxteth, Herbert Samuel was born in Liverpool. He was brought up Orthodox but lost faith in Judaism while at Oxford. In 1909 he became the first Jewish Cabinet Minister and the next year became the Postmaster General of the United Kingdom. He played a prominent part in discussions leading to the Zionist Balfour Declaration of 1917. In 1920 he became High Commissioner of the British mandate in Palestine. His period of rule was marked by severe Arab anti-Jewish riots in 1921.  He formulated a policy of Jewish immigration which was followed by peace until he left in 1925. The foundation of the Jewish national home in Palestine had been securely laid but Samuel’s efforts to draw the Arabs into the political community failed. Back in England he held various senior positions in the Government of the day.  He was a strong supporter of Jewish emigration from Germany in the 1930s and gave them much help. After the war he wrote about liberal philosophy. His efforts were pivotal to the ultimate establishment of the State of Israel.

 

SINGING

Hannah Szenes (1921 – 1944) 

Hannah Szenes was born in Budapest, Hungary. On account of rising anti-Jewish activity in Hungary, she became a Zionist and immigrated to Israel, where she went to agricultural college and worked the land on a kibbutz. She and 32 other Jews formally joined the British army and were trained as parachutists in Cairo. With the goal of reaching her native Budapest, Szenes was parachuted into Yugoslavia in March, 1944, and spent three months with Tito’s partisans. After a while, she grew dissatisfied because she felt that the partisans were not interested in helping Jews escape. When Germany started deporting Jews from her native Hungary, Szenes crossed the border with a French partisan and two Jews who were escaping. On June 7, 1944, at the height of the deportation of Hungarian Jews, Szenes crossed the border into Hungary. She was caught almost immediately by the Hungarian police. Although tortured repeatedly and cruelly over the next several months, Szenes refused to reveal information. She did not cooperate even when the police threatened to harm her mother. She was sentenced to death for treason and faced a firing squad without a blindfold.  

SINGING

 

LONG VERSION

a.k.a. Parashat Shelach-Lecha 

 

God told Moses that He had given Canaan to the people of Israel. He instructed Moses to send out spies to take the lie of the land – a leader from each tribe.  Moses duly selected the men, one of whom was Joshua, from the tribe of Ephraim.

Moses sent the men through the Negev and up into the hill country. They were to ascertain whether the land was fertile and whether the cities were camps or strongholds. They were also to bring back fruit from the land.

The men travelled through the Negev to Hebron, and then came to the Valley of Eshcol where they collected grapes, pomegranates and figs. After 40 days of reconnaissance they returned, reported back to Moses and the people, and showed them the fruit they’d gathered.

They told the people that the land they had seen flowed with “milk and honey”. However, they said, the local inhabitants looked strong and they lived in large, fortified cities. They reported that the Amalekites lived in the Negev, the Hittites, Jebusites and Amorites in the hill country, and the Canaanites by the sea and along the Jordan.

There was disquiet among the people concerning the reported strength of the inhabitants of the land. Caleb, the spy chosen from the tribe of Judah, maintained that the people of Israel had the power to conquer the land, and should do so immediately.  Other spies disagreed, and spoke falsely of the land – it was inhospitable, they claimed, and the inhabitants were virtual giants!

There was unrest and distress among the people following the reports of the spies, and the people complained to Moses and Aaron. “We should have died in Egypt or the wilderness,” they said. “Why has God led us and our families here to be slaughtered? Wouldn’t it be better to return to Egypt?”

Then some among the people suggested that a captain be chosen and that a plan to return to Egypt be made.   Moses and Aaron prostrated themselves before the people. Joshua and Caleb tore their clothes in mourning and swore to the people that the land they’d seen was exceedingly fertile. They pleaded with the people not to rebel against God or succumb to their fear of the people of the Land. Their appeal fell on deaf ears and the crowd decided that Moses, Aaron, Joshua and Caleb should be stoned to death.

At this moment, God’s presence manifested itself to the assembled throng. God demanded to know from Moses how long the people would display such unfaithfulness. He threatened to inflict a plague upon them and disinherit them from being his people. He warned that he would instead build a new nation from Moses’ descendants. Moses remonstrated that God should not kill his own people. He begged God to show mercy to the people, although he recognised that those who had told lies about the land and sown fear could not expect to escape punishment.

God conceded that He would pardon the people but he said that he would nevertheless bring down a punishment upon those who had seen His great miracles but had still disobeyed Him and shown faithlessness.  

Then God told the people to set out for the wilderness by way of the Red Sea. He instructed Moses and Aaron to let it be known to those unfaithful to God that their dead bodies would fall in the wilderness and they would not enter the Promised Land. Of the spies, only Caleb and Joshua would be allowed to enter the land. The children of the unfaithful would have to spend 40 years as shepherds in the wilderness before entering the land that was promised.

So it transpired that those who had spied on the land and returned with false reports died of a plague. Caleb and Joshua, who’d spoken the truth, were spared. Some parties among the people of Israel were dismayed and left the next morning for the hill country, determined to enter the Promised Land on their own. Moses warned them not to disobey God by trying to go there, but they set out anyway, and were killed by the Amalekites and the Canaanites.

God instructed Moses to tell the remainder of the people of the sacrifices they should make to Him when they entered the Promised Land – cereal, oil and wine with each sacrificed lamb, ram or bull and cakes from the threshing room floor. This sacrifice as specified was to be made by the people as well as by strangers living among them. The people living among them were to be regarded as part of their community. 

God further instructed Moses that if, for some accidental reason, a person did not obey His commandments he should atone by offering a young bull as a burnt offering. If a single person sinned unintentionally, he should offer a year-old female goat by way of atonement. An intentional offender, however, should be ostracised by the community.

While the people were in the wilderness they found a man gathering sticks on the Sabbath, and he was brought before Moses and Aaron. God ordered that the man be stoned to death, and this was done as had been ordered.

Finally, God instructed Moses to tell the people that they should put tassels on the corners of their garments and attach a blue cord to each tassel. This was to assist the people to remember that they should obey God’s commandments. “I am the Lord your God,” he reminded them.

 

Commentary on the 37th parsha (portion of the Torah). The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: Methuselah, this is a disturbing passage. Firstly, we have the same incomprehensible faithlessness of the people that we’ve seen before. They have seen miracles galore, and God Himself appeared at the top of Sinai in all His glory, and yet the people act as if they’d seen nothing and heard nothing. How, after the Plagues, the Red Sea Crossing and the giving of the Commandments, could they possibly doubt God’s power? He drove the Egyptians into the sea, so defeat of the Amalekites and Canaanites was surely guaranteed! Yet here we witness an apparently sizeable faction saying they should never have left Egypt in the first place! It makes no sense!

MS: The story once again shows that the people needed to be reminded now and then of the greatness of God, and the need to be faithful to Him.  The problem with some of those people is that they were quick to forget what God had done for them, because they had it too good and were starting to take their privileges for granted.

SAS: Oh you mean Manna from heaven and tablets of stone while wandering in the Wilderness on a promise? Probably, you’ll argue that they were in their spiritual infancy anyway. They were the first recipients of God’s Law and therefore had not yet attained spiritual maturity or constancy.

MS: That’s part of it. You are learning something here, after all.

SAS: Pull the other one, mate. These people behaved in the most incredible way. If nothing else, they should have been petrified of God. They’d seen what he could do. Your story is inconsistent. Your version of human psychology doesn’t ring true. 

MS: You will not allow yourself to absorb the real issues here. The people had lost their way again. They were still in a spiritual wilderness. They demonstrated their confusion, and they had to be shown the way yet again.  

SAS: Well, that’s a funny way of showing them the way, I must say. It looks a bit harsh to me, more like an insistence on absolute loyalty than a manifestation of gentle guidance. In fact, I want to ask you about the murder of Jews by other Jews in this alarming account. If your story is true, and perhaps it does refer to an internal conflict that actually arose, it would point to Jew-on-Jew slaughter.

MS: Excuse me! Are we referring to the same passage? Perhaps you have misread my Hebrew. There is no mention of Jews killing Jews.

SAS: Not directly. But nobody is gullible enough to believe that those who were unfaithful to God simply died of plague in the wilderness. That’s code for saying that Moses and Aaron took them into the middle of nowhere and either left them to die, or presided over their execution. Any rational person would understand exactly what was going on here. There was an attempted putsch against Moses, Aaron, Joshua, Caleb and their supporters about which strategy to follow. Those who argued for caution and a temporary retreat were branded cowards and backsliders and were punished by death.

MS: You have no right to accuse a great leader like Moses of such action. He was simply God’s messenger and it was God who punished the dissenters!

SAS: Oh, so it’s God that’s the murderer then? Moses is clean? Your story tells the truth; your interpretation is shortsighted.

MS: You are a complete blasphemer. I have no idea why I even discuss important and serious matters with you. Moses was a great leader, a man of principle and morality, god-fearing and law abiding.

SAS: Nonsense! He wouldn’t have recruited a military man of Joshua’s strength and cunning if he didn’t mean to control the people through force if necessary. I’m not condemning him – merely pointing out that in the desert, during desperate times, leaders do whatever is necessary to stay in charge. If there is a grain of truth to this tale, then Moses had those people of Israel who challenged his authority and his plan killed. You go out of your way to make him look a pacifist by having him prostrate himself before the people and plead on behalf of God and his instructions. And then you bring God in to miraculously save our heroes from a stoning. But in the real world, if Moses had been a real leader, those dissenters would have been marched off and killed. If this story has any historical basis, this is exactly what happened.

MS: You love rewriting scripture according to your own prejudices, don’t you? All your arguments are tailored to suit your views. On the one hand you say you don’t believe my account. Then, when you wish to vilify biblical heroes for their supposed evil deeds, you suddenly decide that the story might be anchored in a real event. You will, of course, never find an episode that you think is true and that also shows God and his chosen prophets in a positive light. Your preconceptions govern your response at every turn. Admit it – you argue simply to suit yourself.

SAS: Well, if logic and reason are considered preconceptions, then – yes – I argue to suit my preconceptions. One of which, I will add, is moral outrage at social injustice – like stoning a man to death for carrying wood on the Sabbath. You say it was God who ordered this stoning. What kind of God is he? Why not blame the mob, and save God’s reputation, as Moses always wanted to do?

MS: It was a time when absolute obedience to God’s word was necessary. Don’t you see how this episode follows from the preceding ones? The narrative makes clear that both in big things and in small, absolute obedience was necessary to keep the people together and secure victory over the enemy.

SAS: Absolute obedience appears to be necessary at all times with your God. There’s no question here of a more or less obedient person. It’s all or nothing with this character you’ve created. I want to tell you that nothing you say could possibly convince me that killing a man for picking up some wood, probably to make warmth for his family, is in any way excusable, whether he does it on the Sabbath or any other day. This is primitive, superstitious rubbish and I fail to see you how you can justify it and report it as an act of God’s will. Remember “Thou shalt not kill?” Or is this one of the many exceptions to that rule?

MS: Look, Sigmund. A community needs to be bound by a common set of rules and principles. Those who do not obey cannot be part of the community. Especially where there is a shortage of resources, and people are facing danger, there is no room for dissent. People who disobey the rules of the community must be removed.

SAS: It doesn’t sound like you value the preservation of human life at all. Where’s the sanctity we keep hearing about? Then you come with an instruction about how men should wear the Four Corners to remember to obey God’s commandments. Coming after an act of ritual murder, this injunction is totally hollow. How can we take wearing these garments seriously? What do these commandments mean?

MS: If you would stop imposing your skewed, faithless interpretation of God’s word, it would be much easier to see how the Commandments make sense and lead to us living a moral and faithful life.

SAS: Moral? I wonder how moral it is that a group of homeless wanderers in the desert appear over the horizon to spy on the local population with the purpose of slaying them and grabbing their land. I concede that there were no principles of international law pertaining at the time, but – honestly – do you think what was being planned by Caleb and Joshua can be justified on moral grounds?

MS: The Land was given to our people by God. That is the overriding principle.

SAS: When you refer to “our people”, do you include women in that description? I assume they were present during these events, although one would hardly guess it. The omission of women from your text makes it sexist, although you’re only following the example of your God, who clearly isn’t interested in women’s contribution to society either.

MS: Look, could I have an early lunch? I’ve been up transcribing scrolls since early morning and would enjoy a little time to relax before this afternoon’s work. 

SAS: Let me not detain you. You are doing God’s work, after all.

  

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        God gave me such a good brain that in one minute I can worry more than others do in a year.

·        From dust we come and to dust we return but in between let’s have a blintz.

·        It’s no disgrace to be poor – which is the only good thing to say about it.

·        If you lend someone five dollars and he avoids you, you’ve gotten off cheap.

·        Look at Jewish history. Unrelieved lamenting would be intolerable. So, for every ten Jews beating their breasts, God designated one to be crazy and amuse the breast beaters. By the time I was five I knew I was that one.  (Mel Brooks) 

 

 

The Parsha we have just read comes from the five books of Moses, the Torah. The dialogues between Sigmund Albert Spinoza and Methuselah Solomon are about the meaning of the Parsha.

 

What we know about Jewish History, however, is based in fact, and on historical records. 

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

The Expulsion of Jews from Muslim Countries 

 

While it is technically more accurate to speak of the exodus of Jews from Muslim countries rather than their expulsion, it is fair to say that after the Arab-Israeli War of 1948 Jews were more or less forced to flee Egypt, Morocco, Yemen, Tunisia, Lebanon, Algeria, Syria, Bahrain and Iraq. Governments and other citizens made life untenable and unsafe for its Jewish residents. Departure became necessary to ensure survival. In Iraq, parliament passed the Ordinance for the Cancellation of Iraqi Nationality for Jews in 1950, and then legalized the confiscation of Jewish property in 1951 while making Zionist affiliation a crime. This constituted an effective expulsion of Jews.

 

Jews had long lived in the countries mentioned above, although their status was not on a par with other residents. As “dhimmi” – non-Muslims enjoying the protection of Muslim rulers – they were granted limited rights and had to pay the “jizya”, a special tax. They could not inter-marry with Muslims and often had to wear distinctive clothing. They ran their own affairs within their own communities. The quality of life fluctuated, with some communities being subject to intermittent persecution, murder, forced conversions and the burning of synagogues.

 

By 1948 there were some 900,000 Jews in these Arab lands. Today there are fewer than 7,000. After the 1948 war Jews found themselves in a steadily deteriorating situation within these countries and the exodus began in earnest. A sizeable group of some 45,000 Jews left for the newly established state of Israel. Zionism was a motivating factor but persecution was an even more powerful one.

 

In the aftermath of the war, persecution became rife. By 1952 as many as 850,000 Jews had left Arab countries, and nearly 600,000 of them went to Israel. The rest went to Europe, or North and South America.

 

The story of the Iraqi Jews is especially poignant. In 1941 the community saw almost 200 of its members murdered, 2,000 injured and 900 homes destroyed in a two-day mob riot in Baghdad and other cities. This infamous Farhud (pogrom) was instigated by pro-Nazi leaders who staged a coup against the pro-British government of the time. The coup ultimately failed.

 

There were 150,000 Jews in Iraq in 1948 but today there are virtually none. Iraq banned Jews from leaving after 1948 to prevent the consolidation of the Israeli state. Then, bowing to pressure, it allowed Jews a limited time in which to leave. In the wake of a series of bomb attacks in the country, 120,000 Jews had left by 1951. In the same year a Zionist underground operation was discovered and two Jews were hanged on bombing charges.

 

After 11 Jews were publically hanged in Baghdad and Basra in 1969, 2,500 Jews left Iraq, leaving almost no Jews in that country. 

 

Many Jews arriving in Israeli lived in refugee camps that have since been dismantled.

 

Most of the Jews who were forced to leave Arab lands in the 20th century were from Sephardic and Mizrahi backgrounds. Almost half the Jews in Israel today are these people or their descendants. There remains a tension between these Jews and their Ashkenazi fellow citizens in Israel. 

 

Here follows a discussion on this historical segment by Dad, Chaya and Ben. 

 

BEN: That’s interesting. I didn’t know that there were so many Jews in the Arab countries up until so recently.

DAD: Well, in a way they co-existed pretty well, for many years, maintaining their differences in belief, but in the main, tolerated.

CHAYA: Apart from the occasional burning of a synagogue, enduring bouts of persecution, having to pay a special tax, having to wear special clothing to identify themselves.

DAD: As far as the history of the Jews goes, their lot was not that terrible, compared to that of European Jews, for instance. I’m not saying that what they had to endure was acceptable or should be ignored; I’m simply saying that they were able to co-exist alongside Muslims and other Arabs for a long time.

BEN: But they were always made to feel their difference, and pay for it.

DAD: You know, it’s possible that this separation is encouraged both by Jews and the people among whom they have lived. Jews do live differently; we do have different belief systems. We wouldn’t have it any other way.

CHAYA: Yes, but to be persecuted for it? Why does that always happen?

DAD: Well, as I always remind you, people are threatened by difference. Humans do not like what they do not know and understand, and often difference is demonised.

BEN: In any event, once the persecutions started, they happened thick and fast, and every Jew who could get out of Muslim and Arabic countries fled. But perhaps they were not persecuted because they were Jews. For instance, one of the worst outbreaks of violence against the Jews in Iraq was motivated by anti-British sentiment. The attack on Jews might be seen as collateral damage.

CHAYA: Don’t be ridiculous! They were persecuted because they were Jews. Remember, the attacks were coordinated by a pro-Nazi party.

DAD: No one is denying the persecution that Jews in these countries endured.  I’m simply saying that they lasted there for a long time. It’s also interesting that the fact that Jews left in droves to go to Israel was often motivated by their desire to escape persecution, rather than their commitment to Zionism.

BEN: Well, that’s true for a lot of Jews, wherever they came from, isn’t it?

DAD: Well, that’s why it is very difficult to assign to the Jews as a whole a single attitude about Zionism and the existence of Israel. Many used Israel as a place to flee to. Others see it differently, some as a land promised by God, some as a place to be shared by all its inhabitants.

CHAYA: Well, for the refugees, it’s lucky that Israel existed.

DAD: This is a problem for all Jews today, to decide whether their safety and freedom can only be guaranteed in the countries in which they live because Israel exists, or whether large parts of the world now have built-in guarantees against persecution, and they are safe to be who they choose. 

 

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humour, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        God gave me such a good brain that in one minute I can worry more than others do in a year.

·        From dust we come and to dust we return but in between let’s have a blintz.

·        It’s no disgrace to be poor – which is the only good thing to say about it.

·        If you lend someone five dollars and he avoids you, you’ve gotten off cheap.

·        Look at Jewish history. Unrelieved lamenting would be intolerable. So, for every ten Jews beating their breasts, God designated one to be crazy and amuse the breast beaters. By the time I was five I knew I was that one.  (Mel Brooks) 

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Herbert Louis Samuel (1870-1963) 

 

First Viscount of Mount Carmel and Toxteth, Herbert Samuel was born in Liverpool. He was brought up Orthodox but lost faith in Judaism while at Oxford. In 1909 he became the first Jewish Cabinet Minister and the next year became the Postmaster General of the United Kingdom. He played a prominent part in discussions leading to the Zionist Balfour Declaration of 1917. In 1920 he became High Commissioner of the British mandate in Palestine. His period of rule was marked by severe Arab anti-Jewish riots in 1921.  He formulated a policy of Jewish immigration which was followed by peace until he left in 1925. The foundation of the Jewish national home in Palestine had been securely laid but Samuel’s efforts to draw the Arabs into the political community failed. Back in England he held various senior positions in the Government of the day.  He was a strong supporter of Jewish emigration from Germany in the 1930s and gave them much help. After the war he wrote about liberal philosophy. His efforts were pivotal to the ultimate establishment of the State of Israel.

 

Hannah Szenes (1921 – 1944) 

Hannah Szenes was born in Budapest, Hungary. On account of rising anti-Jewish activity in Hungary, she became a Zionist and immigrated to Israel, where she went to agricultural college and worked the land on a kibbutz. She and 32 other Jews formally joined the British army and were trained as parachutists in Cairo. With the goal of reaching her native Budapest, Szenes was parachuted into Yugoslavia in March, 1944, and spent three months with Tito’s partisans. After a while, she grew dissatisfied because she felt that the partisans were not interested in helping Jews escape. When Germany started deporting Jews from her native Hungary, Szenes crossed the border with a French partisan and two Jews who were escaping. On June 7, 1944, at the height of the deportation of Hungarian Jews, Szenes crossed the border into Hungary. She was caught almost immediately by the Hungarian police. Although tortured repeatedly and cruelly over the next several months, Szenes refused to reveal information. She did not cooperate even when the police threatened to harm her mother. She was sentenced to death for treason and faced a firing squad without a blindfold.  

Song 

 

We will now sing a traditional song to conclude our Shabbat celebration. You have a copy of the words, so please join in as we sing.

 

The song is sung

 

Farewell and an Invitation

 

Thank you for coming together to share our Shabbat. May you go out into the new week with renewed strength, confidence and happiness.

 

We now cordially invite you to join us for some coffee and cake.

 

 

 

 

HOW TO SING THE SONGS
ADON OLAM WORDS
Adon Olam David Solid Gould & The Temple Rockers
ALL MEN ARE BROTHERS
ALLE BRUDER SONG
ALLE BRIDER SONG
AL KOL ELEH WORDS
AL KOL ELEH
BASHANA words
BASHANA SONG
BEI MIR BIST DU SHEYN
BEI MIR BIST DU SCHEYN SONG
BMBDS song
CHIRIBIM WORDS
CHIRIBIM Song
DAYENU WORDS
DAYENU SONG ENGLISH
DAYENU SONG
DONNA DONNA
DONNA DONNA SONG
HALLELUYA
HALELUJA KARAOKE
HATIKVA
HATIKVA SONG
HATIKVA SONG
DAYENU
HATIKVA WORDS
HATIKVA SONG 1
HAVA NAGILA WORDS
HAVA NAGILA SONG
HAVA NAGILA KARAOKE
HAVEINU SHALOM ALEICHEM
HEVENU SHALOM ALEICHEM WORDS
HEVENU SHALOM ALECHEM SONG
HINEH MA TOV WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD KARAOKE IVRIT
JERUSALEM THE GOLD SONG
JERUSALEM THE GOLD JARAOKE
MAYIM MAYIM WORDS
MAYIM MAYIM DANCE
OIF'N PRIPITSCHOK song
OSE SHALOM
OSE SHALOM SONG
PAPI ROS'N
PAPIROS'N SONG
PARTISAN SONG 1
PARTISAN SONG
PARTISAN SONG MUSIC
RABBI ELIMELEKH
RABBI ELIMELEKH SONG
AS DER REBE SINGT
AS DER REBBE SINGT LEONARD COHEN
AS DER REBBE SINGT SONG
RAISINS WITH ALMONDS WORDS
SIMANTOV U MAZELTOV WORDS
SIMAN TOV MUSIC
MAZELTOV CLARINET
TUMBALALAIKA WORDS
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA 4
TZENA TZENA The Weavers
TZENA TZENA WORDS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
HATIKVA STREISAND
HATIKVA STREISAND
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
YO EN ESTANDO - SEPHARDIC
ELIYAHU SEPHARDIC
SEPHARDIC SONG
SEPHARDIC SONG 3
Sholem Aleichem Susan Allen
Shalom Aleichem Susan Allen
OTHER VERSIONS OF SONGS
DUVID CROCKET WORDS
DUVID CROCKET MICKEY KATZ
MODERN PASSOVER SONGS
This will help you find yourself]