THE GOOD SHABBOS COMMUNITY

ENJOYING YOUR JEWISH HERITAGE THROUGH FOOD, FACTS AND FUN - SHABBAT SHALOM

 

 CHALLAH, WINE,  CANDLES , READ A LITTLE, TALK A LITTLE AND SING

TO ACT OR NOT TO ACT BLOG HOME WHY ABOUT US WHO FOR CONTACT WHERE LINKS FOOD FOR SHABBOS SHARING WHAT WE DO EACH SHABBOS SHABBOS LIGHT WEEKLY CONTENT SONGS - THE MUSIC
 

July 23

Short version

 

Challah dips wine drinks candles

 

SINGING

Parshat Mattot  

 

Moses spoke to the chiefs of all the tribes of Israel, and explained to them the laws governing the annulment of vows. A man must keep an oath he has made.  The same applies to a woman, unless, during her youth, her father stands in the way of an oath she has made or, in her marriage, her husband obstructs her. In the absence of men obstructing her vows, a woman too is responsible to God for keeping her vows.

 

God then instructed Moses to wage war against the Midianites as retribution for their role in fomenting the moral destruction of the people of Israel.  God told Moses that once that war was completed, he would die in front of the people.

 

The warriors of Israel killed all the males and kings and also Bilaam, son of Beor. They took as captives the women of Midian and their children, all their livestock and flocks and all their possessions. They brought this booty to Moses and Eleazar, the priest, in front of the whole community. 

 

Moses was angry with the warriors and said, “So you allowed all the females to live? Lo! These are the ones who, on Bilaam's advice, were to cause the sons of Israel to act faithlessly against the Lord so that the plague broke out within the community of God.” He then ordered the soldiers to kill every male child and every female who was not a virgin. He ordered the soldiers who had done the killing to stay outside the camp for seven days, to be cleared of sin. 

 

God instructed Moses as to how the spoils of the war were to be divided amongst the people of Israel, and the specific allocation to the warriors, the Levites and to the High Priest. These tributes included animals, virgin females and gold.  

 

SINGING

 

Commentary on the 42nd parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: Well, Methuselah, we get quite an interesting perspective on vows here. So, nobody gets a second chance if they break a vow? At least, unless they happen to be women!

MS: A vow is a serious thing, particularly if it is made before God.

SAS: If you think that there is a God.

MS: Well, obviously I do. If you don’t, remember that God knows you exist, whether you acknowledge his existence or not.

SAS: OK, for the purposes of discussion, as you know, I always allow that God exists. But he is a tough nut, this character of yours. He brooks no frailty.

MS: Why should he?  A vow is a very serious contract, and God always keeps his side of the bargain, so why shouldn’t we?

SAS: Because we are human beings, and these things are not always easy, particularly obeying the kinds of demands that God seems to make.

MS: Well, that’s the nature of our overall covenant with God. He gave us the Promised Land and said we were to be his people. That seems a good deal.

SAS: It sounds like domestic abuse to me. He hits us because he loves us. As long as we do whatever he wants, he will look after us. And poor old Moses, he went through all this suffering, for forty years or more, and now God is going to punish him before he even gets to go to the Promised Land.

MS: You refuse to understand that God is our father, our king, and our protector. If he decides that the time has come for someone to die, we cannot question that.

SAS: Look, I feel sorry for Moses. And, incidentally, for the poor virgins who were handed out as spoils of war. And for those women who were killed for being a bad influence, and for the young boys who didn’t do anything wrong other than being born Midianites.

MS: Context, Sigmund, remember the context. We are looking at a group of people whose very survival as a people was at stake. They had no choice but to protect themselves.

SAS: Protection is one thing, Methuselah, but revenge is quite another! I am amazed that you present your God, your righteous and holy God, as the one who orders the killing of young men and the taking of virgins as spoils of war.

SINGING

 

The Six-Day War 

Egypt’s president Gamal Abdel Nasser led the call by Arab nationalists for the destruction of Israel. Border clashes between Israel and its Arab neighbors were common. In May 1967, Nasser expelled the United Nations Emergency Force (UNEF) from the Sinai Peninsula. UN attempts to negotiate with the Egyptian government failed.

 

On 15 May, Egypt began its deployment of 100,000 troops and 950 tanks on the Israeli border. On 22 May, the Straits of Tiran were closed to all ships flying the Israeli flag. Israel responded by calling up 70,000 reservists to assist the IDF as war loomed. During May, Nasser worked hard to secure Syrian (75,000) troops and Jordanian (55,000) deployment. On 18 May, Syrian troops were deployed along the Golan Heights. King Hussein of Jordan signed a defense pact with Egypt on 30 May.

 

Nasser’s operational plan changed four times during May, and this involved continual redeployment of troops, vehicles and weaponry. Israel landed the first blow on 5 June, and this strike proved decisive to the war’s outcome. The Israeli Air Force launched Operation Focus (Moked) and this surprise attack destroyed the bulk of the Egyptian air force, a major blow since Egypt had boasted 450 Soviet-built fighter planes. More than 300 of these were destroyed in the raid, and 100 Egyptian pilots were killed.

 

Nineteen Israeli planes were lost, and air supremacy for the war was secured when the Jordanian, Syrian and Iraqi air forces quickly sustained big losses. By the evening of 6 June, Israel claimed to have destroyed 416 Arab aircraft, with 26 losses. Things went equally successfully for Israel on the ground. On 7 June the Old City of Jerusalem was taken, with Israeli paratroopers prominent in the heavy fighting.

 

Defense Minister Moshe Dayan and Chief of Staff Yitzhak Rabin arrived to formalize the Jewish return to its historic capital. The IDF forces also captured the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, the Sinai Peninsula and the Golan Heights. Israel accepted a ceasefire on 10 June, even though it was in a position to advance on Cairo, Damascus and Amman.

 

In the war, Israel lost 777 soldiers. 15,000 Egyptians died, with 2,500 Syrians and 800 Jordanians killed. In the war, Israel more than trebled its territory from 8,000 to 26,000 square miles. As a result of the peace, more than 750,000 Palestinians fell under Jewish rule.

 

In November 1967, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 242 for the region. Israel would withdraw from some territories occupied in the war in exchange for peace with its neighbors.

 

The resolution included the “acknowledgment of the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of every State in the area and their right to live in peace within secure and recognized boundaries”. All peace negotiations since then have been based on Resolution 242.

 

SINGING

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        As among fish, so among men: the larger swallow the smaller. (Talmud)

·        What a fat belly costs, I wish I had; what it does, I wish on my enemies.

·        The rich don’t have children; they have heirs.

·        The joy of Jews is never free of anxiety.

·        “Rebbe, what did Eve do when Adam came home late?”

“She counted his ribs.”

 

SINGING

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Ruth Arnon (1933 - ) 

Ruth Arnon is an eminent Israeli biochemist and immunologist who has won several international prizes including the Robert Koch Prize in Medical Sciences (1979), the Jimenez Diaz Award (1986), the French Legion of Honour (1994), the Wolf Prize (1998), the Rothschild Prize (1998), and the Israeli Prize (2001). She is the co-developer of the multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone which has a worldwide distribution. It was Israel’s first home-developed drug. She has served as president of the European Federation of Immunological Societies (EFIS) and as secretary-general of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS). Prof. Arnon says she is motivated by the satisfaction she gets from preventing suffering.

SINGING

 

Albert Abraham Michelson (1852-1931) 

Michelson was the first American to win the Nobel Prize in the sciences. He was born in the Kingdom of Prussia and was taken to the USA by his parents in very early childhood. An early interest in scientific matters led to his being specially appointed to the US Naval Academy in 1869 by President Ulysses S. Grant. He went on to become an instructor in physics and chemistry at that institution. After two years of study in Europe, he returned to the USA and in 1887 he and Edward Morley carried out the celebrated Michelson-Morley experiment which appeared to disprove the existence of “luminiferous ether” through which light waves had been thought to move.  His work with astronomical interferometers to measure stellar diameters and the separation of binary stars also won him acclaim. He went on to become the head of physics at Chicago University and in 1907 won the Nobel Prize for his work with optical precision instruments. In 1923 he won the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society. A crater of the moon is named after him. 

 

SINGING

LON G VERSION

 

 

 

a.k.a The People get the spoils of war (Numbers 30:2-32:42) 

 

Moses spoke to the chiefs of all the tribes of Israel, and explained to them the laws governing the annulment of vows. A man must keep an oath he has made.  The same applies to a woman, unless, during her youth, her father stands in the way of an oath she has made or, in her marriage, her husband obstructs her. In the absence of men obstructing her vows, a woman too is responsible to God for keeping her vows.

 

God then instructed Moses to wage war against the Midianites as retribution for their role in fomenting the moral destruction of the people of Israel.  God told Moses that once that war was completed, he would die in front of the people.

 

The warriors of Israel killed all the males and kings and also Bilaam, son of Beor. They took as captives the women of Midian and their children, all their livestock and flocks and all their possessions. They brought this booty to Moses and Eleazar, the priest, in front of the whole community. 

 

Moses was angry with the warriors and said, “So you allowed all the females to live? Lo! These are the ones who, on Bilaam's advice, were to cause the sons of Israel to act faithlessly against the Lord so that the plague broke out within the community of God.” He then ordered the soldiers to kill every male child and every female who was not a virgin. He ordered the soldiers who had done the killing to stay outside the camp for seven days, to be cleared of sin. 

 

God instructed Moses as to how the spoils of the war were to be divided amongst the people of Israel, and the specific allocation to the warriors, the Levites and to the High Priest. These tributes included animals, virgin females and gold.  

 

The tribes of Reuben and Gad (later joined by half of the tribe of Menasseh) had great wealth in herds of cattle. They asked Moses and Eleazar the priest for the lands east of the Jordan as their portion in the Promised Land, because these would be prime pastureland for their cattle.  

 

Moses was angry and asked them, "Is it fitting for your brothers to go to war and for you to stay here? And why do you try to influence the people of Israel from crossing over into the land that God has given them? That is how your fathers acted when I sent them to scout the land. All the scouts lied about the land except for Caleb and Joshua who followed God. Remember how the anger of God was stirred and God made the scouts wander in the wilderness for forty years until that generation had come to an end”. 

 

The sons of Reuben and Gad said, “We want to build places for our cattle and cities for our children. Our children can remain in the fortified cities while we escort the people of Israel to the Promised Land. We will stay until each of them has taken their inheritance in the Promised Land, and we will take our inheritance on this side of land.”  

 

Moses responded that if the tribes of Reuben and Gad would do as they promised then they would be permitted to return to the land they wished to inhabit. However, he warned them that if they did not keep their side of the bargain they would be severely punished. 

 

And so it happened that that the children and wives and herds of the sons of Gad and the sons of Reuben remained in the cities of Gilead and the men went out and conquered enemies as promised. 

 

Commentary on the 42nd parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: Well, Methuselah, we get quite an interesting perspective on vows here. So, nobody gets a second chance if they break a vow? At least, unless they happen to be women!

MS: A vow is a serious thing, particularly if it is made before God.

SAS: If you think that there is a God.

MS: Well, obviously I do. If you don’t, remember that God knows you exist, whether you acknowledge his existence or not.

SAS: OK, for the purposes of discussion, as you know, I always allow that God exists. But he is a tough nut, this character of yours. He brooks no frailty.

MS: Why should he?  A vow is a very serious contract, and God always keeps his side of the bargain, so why shouldn’t we?

SAS: Because we are human beings, and these things are not always easy, particularly obeying the kinds of demands that God seems to make.

MS: Well, that’s the nature of our overall covenant with God. He gave us the Promised Land and said we were to be his people. That seems a good deal.

SAS: It sounds like domestic abuse to me. He hits us because he loves us. As long as we do whatever he wants, he will look after us. And poor old Moses, he went through all this suffering, for forty years or more, and now God is going to punish him before he even gets to go to the Promised Land.

MS: You refuse to understand that God is our father, our king, and our protector. If he decides that the time has come for someone to die, we cannot question that.

SAS: Look, I feel sorry for Moses. And, incidentally, for the poor virgins who were handed out as spoils of war. And for those women who were killed for being a bad influence, and for the young boys who didn’t do anything wrong other than being born Midianites.

MS: Context, Sigmund, remember the context. We are looking at a group of people whose very survival as a people was at stake. They had no choice but to protect themselves.

SAS: Protection is one thing, Methuselah, but revenge is quite another! I am amazed that you present your God, your righteous and holy God, as the one who orders the killing of young men and the taking of virgins as spoils of war.

MS: How naïve you are, and how willfully blind to the context that I keep emphasizing! The young men put to death were future soldiers and persecutors of God’s people, just as the young women were the future mothers of the Midianites.

SAS: Your justifications are hollow indeed, my friend. You can’t deny that God, in your holy text, is presented as sanctioning brutal and barbaric acts. Did his righteousness not transcend the brutal justice, and brutal customs, of the times? Could he not have taught our people a higher and better way to deal with conquered people?

MS: This was a harsh and brutal world where survival was at stake. Dealing harshly with the enemy sent a powerful message throughout the region – God’s people should not be underestimated or opposed.

SAS: How on earth could the Midianites, or any other tribe, believe that our people were God’s people when they behaved exactly the same as everyone else in war, and after war? Where was the godliness to be seen?

MS: In our people’s survival. In their victories! In their being led to their Promised Land! That’s where!

SAS: What a useless argument that is, Methuselah! Naturally, since the people of Israel were successful in conquest, they believed God was protecting them. All that this means, however, is that the supposed God of a conquering people will survive while the gods of conquered people do not. The conquerors then write up the history of the time with their god as the centre of the story. We were strong enough to win, so our so-called God got to live on. If we’d lost, then he’d have been just another name from the time, like Baal, Dagon, Tammuz, Ishtar and Ea.

MS: Are you insane? Those are idols and false gods. You can’t mention them in the same breath as the Hebrew God!

SAS: I just did! And he’d have been just as dead now if our people had been defeated in battle and obliterated.

MS: But there’s the thing! We weren’t! Because God chose us, and protected us and ensured that we won and survived.

SAS: No, it was because we survived that we got to pick who the so-called true god is!

MS: You fail to understand the workings of destiny and how God is revealed in, and through, history. You are willfully blind. By the way, what do you think about the tribes of Reuben and Gad being allowed to stay on the lands to the east of the River Jordan?

SAS: What, am I to understand that as a major concession? Actually I think it’s very convenient, so that for hundreds of years thereafter the descendants of the people of Israel would be able to claim that the land to the east of the Jordan was theirs too, given to them by God. Very convenient!

MS: You are so cynical. I don’t think you are trying to understand anything; you just want to snipe at our holy scriptures.

 

History 

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

The Six-Day War 

Egypt’s president Gamal Abdel Nasser led the call by Arab nationalists for the destruction of Israel. Border clashes between Israel and its Arab neighbors were common. In May 1967, Nasser expelled the United Nations Emergency Force (UNEF) from the Sinai Peninsula. UN attempts to negotiate with the Egyptian government failed.

 

On 15 May, Egypt began its deployment of 100,000 troops and 950 tanks on the Israeli border. On 22 May, the Straits of Tiran were closed to all ships flying the Israeli flag. Israel responded by calling up 70,000 reservists to assist the IDF as war loomed. During May, Nasser worked hard to secure Syrian (75,000) troops and Jordanian (55,000) deployment. On 18 May, Syrian troops were deployed along the Golan Heights. King Hussein of Jordan signed a defense pact with Egypt on 30 May.

 

Nasser’s operational plan changed four times during May, and this involved continual redeployment of troops, vehicles and weaponry. Israel landed the first blow on 5 June, and this strike proved decisive to the war’s outcome. The Israeli Air Force launched Operation Focus (Moked) and this surprise attack destroyed the bulk of the Egyptian air force, a major blow since Egypt had boasted 450 Soviet-built fighter planes. More than 300 of these were destroyed in the raid, and 100 Egyptian pilots were killed.

 

Nineteen Israeli planes were lost, and air supremacy for the war was secured when the Jordanian, Syrian and Iraqi air forces quickly sustained big losses. By the evening of 6 June, Israel claimed to have destroyed 416 Arab aircraft, with 26 losses. Things went equally successfully for Israel on the ground. On 7 June the Old City of Jerusalem was taken, with Israeli paratroopers prominent in the heavy fighting.

 

Defense Minister Moshe Dayan and Chief of Staff Yitzhak Rabin arrived to formalize the Jewish return to its historic capital. The IDF forces also captured the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, the Sinai Peninsula and the Golan Heights. Israel accepted a ceasefire on 10 June, even though it was in a position to advance on Cairo, Damascus and Amman.

 

In the war, Israel lost 777 soldiers. 15,000 Egyptians died, with 2,500 Syrians and 800 Jordanians killed. In the war, Israel more than trebled its territory from 8,000 to 26,000 square miles. As a result of the peace, more than 750,000 Palestinians fell under Jewish rule.

 

In November 1967, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 242 for the region. Israel would withdraw from some territories occupied in the war in exchange for peace with its neighbors.

 

The resolution included the “acknowledgment of the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of every State in the area and their right to live in peace within secure and recognized boundaries”. All peace negotiations since then have been based on Resolution 242.

 

Here follows a discussion on this historical segment by Dad, Chaya and Ben. 

 

DAD: The Six-Day War cost Israel many lives but militarily, politically and geographically it brought a stunning victory for Israel.

CHAYA: True, but feelings of hatred and hostility against Israel remained. The War of Attrition and the Yom Kippur War followed on from the Six-Day War, with the Arab nations wanting to reclaim lost land and lost prestige. All these events are connected in a chain of cause-and-effect.

DAD: Of course! And in such a situation of ongoing enmity, Israel had no choice but to protect its interests and act decisively.

BEN: I get angry when I hear people say that Israel was the aggressor in the Six-Day War, just because it launched a pre-emptive strike after Nasser’s huge military build-up.

DAD: Actually, Ben, a number of Jewish leaders have said that the attack of 5 June was not forced on Israel. Rather, Israel saw an opportunity to turn a hostile situation into a situation of military advantage.

BEN: What do you mean? 

DAD: Let me quote former Israel Prime Minister, Menachem Begin, who said: “The Egyptian army concentrations in the Sinai approaches did not prove that Nasser was really about to attack us. We must be honest with ourselves. We decided to attack him.” 

CHAYA: Are you saying that Israel was the aggressor after that massive military build-up by Egypt and Syria? 

DAD: No! But I’m saying what other Israeli military commanders have said – that the Egyptian build-up in the Sinai wasn’t a cause for war on its own. 

CHAYA: So what Israel did was use Egypt’s aggressive saber-rattling as a pretext for launching a strategic strike? 

DAD: Pretty much. 

BEN: I see what you mean, but that viewpoint leaves the possibility open that Israel was in the wrong, and that it was war-mongering. 

DAD: I hardly think so. Egypt was playing a very foolish and dangerous game. Nasser stirred up pan-Arabic nationalism prior to the war, prepared for war, and then said that if Israel wanted war it would be destroyed. I’ve studied this in detail, and I’ll quote you what Nasser said: “If Israel embarks on an aggression against Syria or Egypt, the battle against Israel will be a general one … and our basic objective will be to destroy Israel.” 

CHAYA: Was Nasser trying to goad Israel into war so that he could then wipe it out? 

DAD: What Nasser was trying to do is still the subject of much discussion. One thing is certain – he made one of the greatest tactical blunders of all time. He invited war, even if he did not directly threaten it, and then he wasn’t ready for it when it came. 15,000 Egyptians died in a war he anticipated, prepared for, and evidently wanted. As a result, Israel expanded its territory, enhanced its military reputation, and had its right to exist entrenched in a United Nations resolution. 

BEN: So, instead of destroying Israel, Nasser effectively breathed new life into the state! 

DAD: Exactly, Ben! Any historian studying this conflict would have to conclude that Nasser undermined his own people’s interests, apart from getting millions of dollars’ worth of Soviet aircraft and other equipment destroyed. 

CHAYA: How come he remained President of Egypt after the defeat? 

DAD: He immediately resigned on 10 June, but there was an outpouring of public protest and he reassumed the presidency the next day. He was the symbol of pan-Arabic pride, and not even this humiliating defeat brought him disgrace. 

BEN: Did he lose influence, though? 

DAD: To a significant degree, he did, and when he accepted Resolution 242, it didn’t go down well within some quarters of the Arab world. He’d been compromised in many people’s eyes, and even his subsequent War of Attrition didn’t give him much of a PR boost. 

CHAYA: Wasn’t pan-Arabic nationalism called Nasserism by some people? 

DAD: Quite right, Chaya, and you’ll still hear the term used occasionally today. 

BEN: So who do you think is most responsible for the success of the Six-Day War? 

DAD:  You’d have to say Moshe Dayan. He was only appointed Defense Minister on 1 June, just before the war, but he and Chief of Staff Yitzhak Rabin brilliantly directed the operations that led to military success. He went on to administer the territories occupied by Israel. We’ll need to talk more about him, because he was very controversial. 

 

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        As among fish, so among men: the larger swallow the smaller. (Talmud)

·        What a fat belly costs, I wish I had; what it does, I wish on my enemies.

·        The rich don’t have children; they have heirs.

·        The joy of Jews is never free of anxiety.

·        “Rebbe, what did Eve do when Adam came home late?”

“She counted his ribs.”

 

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Ruth Arnon (1933 - ) 

Ruth Arnon is an eminent Israeli biochemist and immunologist who has won several international prizes including the Robert Koch Prize in Medical Sciences (1979), the Jimenez Diaz Award (1986), the French Legion of Honour (1994), the Wolf Prize (1998), the Rothschild Prize (1998), and the Israeli Prize (2001). She is the co-developer of the multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone which has a worldwide distribution. It was Israel’s first home-developed drug. She has served as president of the European Federation of Immunological Societies (EFIS) and as secretary-general of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS). Prof. Arnon says she is motivated by the satisfaction she gets from preventing suffering.

 

Albert Abraham Michelson (1852-1931) 

Michelson was the first American to win the Nobel Prize in the sciences. He was born in the Kingdom of Prussia and was taken to the USA by his parents in very early childhood. An early interest in scientific matters led to his being specially appointed to the US Naval Academy in 1869 by President Ulysses S. Grant. He went on to become an instructor in physics and chemistry at that institution. After two years of study in Europe, he returned to the USA and in 1887 he and Edward Morley carried out the celebrated Michelson-Morley experiment which appeared to disprove the existence of “luminiferous ether” through which light waves had been thought to move.  His work with astronomical interferometers to measure stellar diameters and the separation of binary stars also won him acclaim. He went on to become the head of physics at Chicago University and in 1907 won the Nobel Prize for his work with optical precision instruments. In 1923 he won the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society. A crater of the moon is named after him. 

 


HOW TO SING THE SONGS
ADON OLAM WORDS
Adon Olam David Solid Gould & The Temple Rockers
ALL MEN ARE BROTHERS
ALLE BRUDER SONG
ALLE BRIDER SONG
AL KOL ELEH WORDS
AL KOL ELEH
BASHANA words
BASHANA SONG
BEI MIR BIST DU SHEYN
BEI MIR BIST DU SCHEYN SONG
BMBDS song
CHIRIBIM WORDS
CHIRIBIM Song
DAYENU WORDS
DAYENU SONG ENGLISH
DAYENU SONG
DONNA DONNA
DONNA DONNA SONG
HALLELUYA
HALELUJA KARAOKE
HATIKVA
HATIKVA SONG
HATIKVA SONG
DAYENU
HATIKVA WORDS
HATIKVA SONG 1
HAVA NAGILA WORDS
HAVA NAGILA SONG
HAVA NAGILA KARAOKE
HAVEINU SHALOM ALEICHEM
HEVENU SHALOM ALEICHEM WORDS
HEVENU SHALOM ALECHEM SONG
HINEH MA TOV WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD KARAOKE IVRIT
JERUSALEM THE GOLD SONG
JERUSALEM THE GOLD JARAOKE
MAYIM MAYIM WORDS
MAYIM MAYIM DANCE
OIF'N PRIPITSCHOK song
OSE SHALOM
OSE SHALOM SONG
PAPI ROS'N
PAPIROS'N SONG
PARTISAN SONG 1
PARTISAN SONG
PARTISAN SONG MUSIC
RABBI ELIMELEKH
RABBI ELIMELEKH SONG
AS DER REBE SINGT
AS DER REBBE SINGT LEONARD COHEN
AS DER REBBE SINGT SONG
RAISINS WITH ALMONDS WORDS
SIMANTOV U MAZELTOV WORDS
SIMAN TOV MUSIC
MAZELTOV CLARINET
TUMBALALAIKA WORDS
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA 4
TZENA TZENA The Weavers
TZENA TZENA WORDS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
HATIKVA STREISAND
HATIKVA STREISAND
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
YO EN ESTANDO - SEPHARDIC
ELIYAHU SEPHARDIC
SEPHARDIC SONG
SEPHARDIC SONG 3
Sholem Aleichem Susan Allen
Shalom Aleichem Susan Allen
OTHER VERSIONS OF SONGS
DUVID CROCKET WORDS
DUVID CROCKET MICKEY KATZ
MODERN PASSOVER SONGS
This will help you find yourself]