THE GOOD SHABBOS COMMUNITY

ENJOYING YOUR JEWISH HERITAGE THROUGH FOOD, FACTS AND FUN - SHABBAT SHALOM

 

 CHALLAH, WINE,  CANDLES , READ A LITTLE, TALK A LITTLE AND SING

TO ACT OR NOT TO ACT BLOG HOME WHY ABOUT US WHO FOR CONTACT WHERE LINKS FOOD FOR SHABBOS SHARING WHAT WE DO EACH SHABBOS SHABBOS LIGHT WEEKLY CONTENT SONGS - THE MUSIC
 

July 2  SHORT VERSION 

Challah dips wine drinks candles

 

SINGING

 

The people then journeyed to the desert of Zin and camped at Kadesh. Miriam, Moses’s sister, died and was buried there. There was no water to be found at Kadesh and the people railed against Moses and Aaron, demanding to know why they had brought them to that accursed place.

 

Moses and Aaron withdrew to the tabernacle where God appeared before them. He told Moses to take his rod, gather the people in front of a rock, and speak to the rock so that water would flow from it. Moses assembled the people and said to them, “Now, you rebels, do we have to get you water out of this rock?” Moses hit the rock twice, water flowed from the rock, and the people and their animals drank water.

 

God expressed his displeasure to Moses and Aaron because they had not glorified Him during the miraculous display, but had used the occasion for self-glorification. As a consequence of this offence He would not permit them to lead the people into the Promised Land.

 

SINGING

Commentary on the 39th parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: You keep working the same old tired formula. Here, once again, we see the people reacting to difficulty by rebelling against God and Moses. How many times have we had that theme now?

MS: The stories of faithlessness and rebellion tell us about human nature and the way people are quick to forget and quick to apportion blame. The Torah reveals the sad truth that faithfulness requires constant renewal.

SAS: And God shows himself yet again to be all too human in his pettiness, vindictiveness and vengefulness.  Not a good look!

 

SINGING

Background to and Commencement of the Arab-Israeli War (1948) 

 

In the 1920s, an increasing number of Jews moved to Palestine, and the Zionist call for a Jewish state awakened Jewish aspirations just as it created alarm in the Arab world. In 1936 an Arab revolt erupted in Palestine and Jewish farms were destroyed. Some Jews were attacked and killed. The revolt, which was a protest against mass Jewish immigration to the region, lasted from 1936-1939.

The upshot was violence in Palestine. Thousands died and were wounded in civil unrest. Skirmishes between Arabs and Jews took on a more militaristic flavour when Arab militias entered Palestine, and Jews in Jerusalem were blockaded. Palestinian militias were assisted by the Transjordan Arab Legion and the Egyptian Army. The aim was to isolate the 100,000 Jews in Jerusalem from the rest of Palestine.

In the meantime the Haganah achieved a number of notable successes and created a united front around Jerusalem. On 14 May 1948 David Ben-Gurion declared the independence of the state of Israel. The Arab-Israeli War entered a new phase the next day when the armies of several Arab states invaded the disputed territory.

SINGING

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humour, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        Love is sweet, but it’s nice to have bread with it.

·        A third person may not interfere between two that sleep on the same pillow.  

·        Women persuade men to good as well as to evil, but they always persuade.  

·        A bachelor is a man who comes to work each morning from a different direction. (Sholom Aleichem)

·        The road to hell is paved with works-in-progress. (Philip Roth)

 

SINGING

Celebration of Great Lives 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Philip Roth (1933 - ) 

Philip Milton Roth achieved widespread critical acclaim on the publication of his third novel, Portnoy’s Complaint, in 1969. A lot of his fiction has a semi-autobiographical slant, and his fictional alter ego, Nathan Zuckerman, features in several of his novels. His 2001 novella, The Dying Animal, features another recurring character, Professor David Kepesh. Roth’s numerous literary awards include a Pulitzer Prize for the 1997 novel, American Pastoral. He has twice received Britain’s WH Smith Literary Award for the best book of the year. His novels American Pastoral, The Counterlife, Operation Shylock, Sabbath's Theater, The Human Stain, and The Plot Against America have cemented his reputation as one of the greatest novelists of the contemporary era.

 

SINGING

Helene Cixous (1937 - ) 

French writer and professor Helene Cixous was born in Algeria to Jewish parents. She was awarded a doctorate in 1968 for studies in literature. She went on to publish over 70 works including fiction, drama, poetry and literary theory. She achieved widespread acclaim for her 1975 article, The Laugh of the Medusa. She is considered one of the pioneers of poststructuralist feminist theory. Jacques Derrida once described her as the greatest living writer in French. She has written extensively on the relationship between sexuality and language. She is a professor at the University of Paris VIII where she established the first centre for women’s studies in Europe.

 

SINGING

 

Israel Puts its Enemies to the Sword  

a.k.a. Parashat Chuqat (Numbers 19: 1 – 22: 1)

 

God told Moses and Aaron to get the people to bring a red heifer without blemish and slay it before Aaron’s son, Eleazer the priest, so that he could sprinkle its blood before the tabernacle. God reminded the people that anyone who came into contact with a dead body would be unclean for seven days. Such a person would have to undergo a purification rite before being allowed to enter the tabernacle.

 

The people then journeyed to the desert of Zin and camped at Kadesh. Miriam, Moses’s sister, died and was buried there. There was no water to be found at Kadesh and the people railed against Moses and Aaron, demanding to know why they had brought them to that accursed place.

 

Moses and Aaron withdrew to the tabernacle where God appeared before them. He told Moses to take his rod, gather the people in front of a rock, and speak to the rock so that water would flow from it. Moses assembled the people and said to them, “Now, you rebels, do we have to get you water out of this rock?” Moses hit the rock twice, water flowed from the rock, and the people and their animals drank water.

 

God expressed his displeasure to Moses and Aaron because they had not glorified Him during the miraculous display, but had used the occasion for self-glorification. As a consequence of this offence He would not permit them to lead the people into the Promised Land.

 

God said, “These are the waters of Meribah, the waters of disagreement where the people of Israel challenged me.”

 

The people sent a message to the king of Edom asking that the king, who knew of their recent history, allow them to walk peacefully through the land of Edom. This was their message: “We won’t turn aside into any field or vineyard or drink water from any well. We will travel along the king's highway until we have left your territory.”

 

This request was refused. The people then turned towards Mount Hor, where God told Aaron that his earthly days had come to an end. Before passing on, Aaron was instructed to give his priestly garb to his son Eleazer. After following God’s commands, Aaron died and the people mourned for 30 days.

 

The children of Israel continued their journey and their approach was noted by the Canaanite king of Arad. He attacked them, taking some prisoners, but he did not prevail in battle. The people then prayed to God and promised that if he gave them victory, they would destroy all the Canaanite cities. God listened and granted the people victory and they destroyed the cities as they had promised.

 

Then the people walked on beside the Red Sea and couldn’t find bread and water. Once again, the people spoke out against God and Moses. God, in retaliation, sent poisonous snakes among the people and many were bitten, and died. The people then came to Moses and admitted that they had sinned. They asked Moses to pray to God to remove the snakes.

 

God told Moses to make a copper snake and put it on a pole; everyone who looked at it would be healed of their snake bite. This is what happened.

The children of Israel then tried to pass peacefully through the lands of the Amorites, delivering their usual message: “We won’t turn aside into any field or vineyard or drink water from any well. We will travel along the king's highway until we have left your territory."

 

The Amorites, however, declared war on the Israelites, but were defeated. Then the Israelites pressed forward and approached the land of Og, king of Bashan. The Bashanites marched against the people, but were killed to a man.

 

The people of Israel pushed forward and pitched their tents in the plains of Moab, near Jericho.

 

Commentary on the 39th parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: You keep working the same old tired formula. Here, once again, we see the people reacting to difficulty by rebelling against God and Moses. How many times have we had that theme now?

MS: The stories of faithlessness and rebellion tell us about human nature and the way people are quick to forget and quick to apportion blame. The Torah reveals the sad truth that faithfulness requires constant renewal.

SAS: And God shows himself yet again to be all too human in his pettiness, vindictiveness and vengefulness.  Not a good look!

MS: The narrative is about human nature, not about God’s. It is about God’s power, and his commitment to the people, a real contract, to be exacted fully, by both sides. God never let the people down.

SAS: You could have told that truth without inventing cock and bull stories about small-scale rebellions that kept recurring every time something went amiss. But this time you introduced a clever new twist in the water-from-the-rock story – Moses and Aaron get punished in addition to the people. That’s a bit of a surprise!

MS: So much, then, for your claim of predictability and formula-laden narratives! Here the pattern changes and Moses and Aaron receive the punishment of not being allowed to enter the Promised Land. This shows that God’s justice is impartial, and he favours no one.

SAS:  You’re proud of that story? It provides yet another example of your God’s utter unfairness and ludicrous egotism.  The story puts God utterly to shame! After all their obedience and all their courage, Moses and Aaron are prevented from leading the people to their new homeland because of a perceived slight! How ridiculously unfair!

MS:  It only appears unfair if you look at the story from the wrong perspective. You say Moses and Aaron were entitled to preferential treatment. But you forget the principle of noblesse oblige. Moses and Aaron held an extraordinarily privileged position among God’s people, and that meant that more – not less – was expected of them. When they indulged in grand-standing, it offended God, and rightly so. Remember that Moses and Aaron were human, and God is not. They should, like all mortals acknowledge their source of life and power.  

SAS: This just God! He supports and sanctions the mass slaughter of Edomites, Amorites and so forth, no doubt including the killing of innocent women and children. How can you possibly justify God’s sanctioning of such wholesale destruction?

MS: Can’t you read? These people brought death upon themselves for rejecting the peaceful overtures of the Jews.

SAS: Peaceful overtures? That’s what your book of bedtime stories tells us, but I think we all know better. You have bent over backwards to make the congregation of Israel into good and polite people who were merely trying to find some space of their own. The truth is that Israel was a strong, virile and well-armed tribe that turned up on people’s doorstep and asked to be allowed to pass down the main road! No king would allow a strange people to do that, no matter how many pious oaths they swore.

MS:  The people came in peace. They had to press forward to settle where God commanded them to settle. What more could they possibly have done except declare their peaceful intentions and ask for free passage?  

SAS: Well, you’re assuming firstly that the story is true, and secondly that the people would have kept their word and marched peacefully through the land of a weaker tribe. I’m not convinced of either proposition. Not to mention that, by your own story, they had the backing of God, who is more powerful that any mortal can imagine. My view is that you’ve bent over backwards to put the chosen people in the right everywhere they went, so that when they slaughter tribes and take over their possessions, they are made to look like righteous people who were set upon by brutal, intransigent opponents. The truth is that the tribes in Canaan were simply people trying to live their lives and protect their homes and the people of Israel was just another tribe – albeit a powerful one – that wanted to take what it could. This story has nothing to do with a Godly people being blessed with divine provenance in their onward march to a Promised Land. It is a brutal, bloody story about a battle for territory and power in a land of limited resources. 

MS: Do you honestly believe that a people who had battled their way through the wilderness under conditions of extreme duress could have walked out of the desert as a fully fledged military power able to defeat established tribes and their armies if they didn’t have divine assistance? What we have here is nothing short of a miraculous advance to the Promised Land thanks to divine direction and intervention. If you cannot see the hand of God in our people’s history, then you are sadly deprived, my friend. 

SAS: I might buy into what you say if our history were a series of escalating victories, but it has some truly terrible defeats and disasters in it, and when that happened you would simply say, “God wasn’t with us then because of our disobedience.” God’s moods, then, are simply adjusted to fit the events of history. You just wait to see what happens, then adjust God’s relationship to the people accordingly.

MS: No! No! It’s that relationship that helps determine what happens. Without faith, and the firm belief that God was with them, our people would never have forged the victories that they did. The hand of God must be recognised when our destiny was forged and God’s promises to our people were miraculously realised.

SAS: You are deluded, Methuselah!

MS: No, I am a faithful Jew who understands that you cannot exclude God from our understanding of ourselves.

SAS: Oh, the concept of God is indispensable to that history. Don’t pretend, however, that such a being exists.

MS: I know He does.

 

History 

 

The Parsha we have just read comes from the five books of Moses, the Torah. The dialogues between Sigmund Albert Spinoza and Methuselah Solomon are about the interpretation of the Parsha.

 

What we know about Jewish History, however, is based in fact, and on historical records. 

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

Background to and Commencement of the Arab-Israeli War (1948) 

 

In the 1920s, an increasing number of Jews moved to Palestine, and the Zionist call for a Jewish state awakened Jewish aspirations just as it created alarm in the Arab world. In 1936 an Arab revolt erupted in Palestine and Jewish farms were destroyed. Some Jews were attacked and killed. The revolt, which was a protest against mass Jewish immigration to the region, lasted from 1936-1939.

The unrest led to the British government’s Peel Commission recommending that Palestine be partitioned into a small Jewish state and an Arab state linked to Jordan. The proposal did nothing to assuage escalating unrest, and the Great Arab Revolt of 1936-1939 saw British control in the area weakening significantly.

In this era, Special Night Squads comprising British forces and Haganah mercenaries conducted raids on Arab villages, confiscating weapons and exerting control reputedly through extreme force. The Great Arab Revolt led directly to the mobilisation of Israeli militias like the Haganah.

In the face of Arab opposition, the British Government tabled the White Paper of 1939 that imposed restrictions on Jewish immigration, an action which enraged many in Jewish communities worldwide and sparked Zionists into organising illegal migrations to Palestine. The British responded by blockading Palestine. The White Paper soured British-Jewish relations and bitterness and mistrust was still evident at the end of World War II (1945).

During the war, Britain recruited both Jewish and Arab units to boost its force levels. A Jewish Brigade was even established in 1944 under the Zionist flag, a measure supported and promoted by Winston Churchill. “I like the idea of the Jews trying to get at the murderers of their fellow countrymen in Central Europe,” said the British PM. The Brigade moved to Belgium and the Netherlands after the war.

That same year (1945) the Arab League was formed by Egypt, Iraq, Transjordan, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Syria and Yemen. It quickly declared a boycott of Jewish businesses in Palestine. Meanwhile, a united Jewish Resistance Movement was formed to oppose the British in Palestine and induce them to leave. It commenced operations in October 1945.

Menachem Begin’s Irgun movement, (literally translated, Irgun means the Organization), a right-wing Zionist group, played a central role in Jewish military resistance to the British Mandate. The Irgun blew up a wing of the King David Hotel in Jerusalem on 22 July, 1946. The hotel housed the central offices of the British Mandatory authorities of Palestine. 91 people were killed and 46 injured. The bombing was also one of the chief reasons for the Haganah abandoning armed resistance.

The bombing and other actions led to the British announcing in February 1947, that they were handing over the Palestine problem to the UN. On 29 November, 1947, the United Nations adopted Resolution 181 that proposed a two-state solution for the troubled area. Jews would get 56% of the land, a dispensation that Jewish leaders accepted. The Arab League rejected the plan, as well as the UN’s right to decide the issue. Its position was that Palestine belonged to the Palestinian people.

The upshot was violence in Palestine.  Thousands died and were wounded in civil unrest. Skirmishes between Arabs and Jews took on a more militaristic flavour when Arab militias entered Palestine, and Jews in Jerusalem were blockaded. Palestinian militias were assisted by the Transjordan Arab Legion and the Egyptian Army. The aim was to isolate the 100,000 Jews in Jerusalem from the rest of Palestine.

This led to David Ben-Gurion reorganizing the Haganah in 1948 and making conscription compulsory. Arms were procured from WWII stockpiles. Plan Dalet was drawn up and the first mission, Operation Nachshon, was designed to lift the blockade at Jerusalem. The route to the city was temporarily freed between 5 April to 20 April and foodstuffs were delivered. The blockade was completely lifted in July.

In the meantime the Haganah achieved a number of notable successes and created a united front around Jerusalem. On 14 May 1948 David Ben-Gurion declared the independence of the state of Israel. The Arab-Israeli War entered a new phase the next day when the armies of several Arab states invaded the disputed territory.

        

Here follows a discussion on this historical segment by Dad, Chaya and Ben. 

 

CHAYA: It’s interesting to look back at the history of the enmity between the Jews and the Arab people. It highlights how difficult it will be to forge a solution that meets both Israeli and Palestinian aspirations.

DAD: Difficult? Some would say impossible. As we’ll see, the Arab states were furious at being outfought and outsmarted by the founders of the Jewish state, and it’s hard to believe that the Palestinians and their supporters will ever accept a solution in which they don’t control Palestine and Jerusalem.

BEN: I always hear people talking about a two-state solution. I didn’t realise that this idea had been around so long. I agree with what Chaya says about it – it would take a genius for anyone to create a proposal for two states that would satisfy both sides.

DAD: Britain was clearly confused as to how it should exercise its Mandate, which it held from 1920 to 1948. The situation in Palestine was complicated by the large number of Jews entering Palestine after the Holocaust. Jewish aspirations were growing and Menachem Begin’s bomb challenged British rule in a highly dramatic fashion. I wonder if he did the right thing.

BEN: Jewish people were among those killed in the blast. This, however, was not meant to happen. I’ve read that the Irgun sent warnings about the bomb, which were not acted upon. At the end of the day, this attack must have affected the British decision to leave and this created a vacuum that the Jews were able to exploit. So maybe Begin did the right thing.

CHAYA: You sound like one of those despots that Orwell mocks – the kind that says, “While we deplore the loss of human life, we must recognise the very real achievements that our assertive acts accomplished.” In other words, “Yes, we committed murder, but sometimes you have to.”

BEN: The hotel was warned of the bomb and, in any case, this bombing wasn’t an isolated act. It was part of a legitimate resistance campaign against an occupying power that was blocking Jewish ambitions and which had shifted its sympathies towards the Arab cause. Begin had a price on his head, but he continued to lead the underground with courage and determination.

DAD: Ben could add that the bombing was in response to Britain’s Operation Agatha, which included the arrest of Jewish Agency leaders and a large confiscation of documents on “Black Saturday”. And did you know, Chaya, that in 2005 Begin was voted the Jewish leader that Jews miss the most?

CHAYA: I find that disturbing. I am a fair-minded person who recognises great achievements, but any person who bombs a hotel is someone who has misjudged a situation badly. It was simply an illegitimate target. I don’t see how anyone can live with himself after doing something like that.

BEN: Great men do not look back and wring their hands. They move forward and make history happen. Their people thank them for it.

CHAYA: People were killed in the street, for heaven’s sake. Innocent people! You can talk all you like about collateral damage, but I see every human life as precious. Most people would agree with me.

BEN: In this case, I think Begin’s action was justified.

DAD:  I’d be more circumspect. I’d say his action was defensible.

CHAYA: I say it wasn’t. .

 

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humour, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        Love is sweet, but it’s nice to have bread with it.

·        A third person may not interfere between two that sleep on the same pillow.  

·        Women persuade men to good as well as to evil, but they always persuade.  

·        A bachelor is a man who comes to work each morning from a different direction. (Sholom Aleichem)

·        The road to hell is paved with works-in-progress. (Philip Roth)

 

Celebration of Great Lives 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Philip Roth (1933 - ) 

Philip Milton Roth achieved widespread critical acclaim on the publication of his third novel, Portnoy’s Complaint, in 1969. A lot of his fiction has a semi-autobiographical slant, and his fictional alter ego, Nathan Zuckerman, features in several of his novels. His 2001 novella, The Dying Animal, features another recurring character, Professor David Kepesh. Roth’s numerous literary awards include a Pulitzer Prize for the 1997 novel, American Pastoral. He has twice received Britain’s WH Smith Literary Award for the best book of the year. His novels American Pastoral, The Counterlife, Operation Shylock, Sabbath's Theater, The Human Stain, and The Plot Against America have cemented his reputation as one of the greatest novelists of the contemporary era.

 

Helene Cixous (1937 - ) 

French writer and professor Helene Cixous was born in Algeria to Jewish parents. She was awarded a doctorate in 1968 for studies in literature. She went on to publish over 70 works including fiction, drama, poetry and literary theory. She achieved widespread acclaim for her 1975 article, The Laugh of the Medusa. She is considered one of the pioneers of poststructuralist feminist theory. Jacques Derrida once described her as the greatest living writer in French. She has written extensively on the relationship between sexuality and language. She is a professor at the University of Paris VIII where she established the first centre for women’s studies in Europe.

 

We will now sing a traditional song to conclude our Shabbat celebration. You have a copy of the words, so please join in as we sing.

 

The song is sung

 

Farewell and an Invitation

 

Thank you for coming together to share our Shabbat. May you go out into the new week with renewed strength, confidence and happiness.

 

We now cordially invite you to join us for some coffee and cake.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOW TO SING THE SONGS
ADON OLAM WORDS
Adon Olam David Solid Gould & The Temple Rockers
ALL MEN ARE BROTHERS
ALLE BRUDER SONG
ALLE BRIDER SONG
AL KOL ELEH WORDS
AL KOL ELEH
BASHANA words
BASHANA SONG
BEI MIR BIST DU SHEYN
BEI MIR BIST DU SCHEYN SONG
BMBDS song
CHIRIBIM WORDS
CHIRIBIM Song
DAYENU WORDS
DAYENU SONG ENGLISH
DAYENU SONG
DONNA DONNA
DONNA DONNA SONG
HALLELUYA
HALELUJA KARAOKE
HATIKVA
HATIKVA SONG
HATIKVA SONG
DAYENU
HATIKVA WORDS
HATIKVA SONG 1
HAVA NAGILA WORDS
HAVA NAGILA SONG
HAVA NAGILA KARAOKE
HAVEINU SHALOM ALEICHEM
HEVENU SHALOM ALEICHEM WORDS
HEVENU SHALOM ALECHEM SONG
HINEH MA TOV WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD KARAOKE IVRIT
JERUSALEM THE GOLD SONG
JERUSALEM THE GOLD JARAOKE
MAYIM MAYIM WORDS
MAYIM MAYIM DANCE
OIF'N PRIPITSCHOK song
OSE SHALOM
OSE SHALOM SONG
PAPI ROS'N
PAPIROS'N SONG
PARTISAN SONG 1
PARTISAN SONG
PARTISAN SONG MUSIC
RABBI ELIMELEKH
RABBI ELIMELEKH SONG
AS DER REBE SINGT
AS DER REBBE SINGT LEONARD COHEN
AS DER REBBE SINGT SONG
RAISINS WITH ALMONDS WORDS
SIMANTOV U MAZELTOV WORDS
SIMAN TOV MUSIC
MAZELTOV CLARINET
TUMBALALAIKA WORDS
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA 4
TZENA TZENA The Weavers
TZENA TZENA WORDS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
HATIKVA STREISAND
HATIKVA STREISAND
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
YO EN ESTANDO - SEPHARDIC
ELIYAHU SEPHARDIC
SEPHARDIC SONG
SEPHARDIC SONG 3
Sholem Aleichem Susan Allen
Shalom Aleichem Susan Allen
OTHER VERSIONS OF SONGS
DUVID CROCKET WORDS
DUVID CROCKET MICKEY KATZ
MODERN PASSOVER SONGS
This will help you find yourself]