THE GOOD SHABBOS COMMUNITY

ENJOYING YOUR JEWISH HERITAGE THROUGH FOOD, FACTS AND FUN - SHABBAT SHALOM

 

 CHALLAH, WINE,  CANDLES , READ A LITTLE, TALK A LITTLE AND SING

TO ACT OR NOT TO ACT BLOG HOME WHY ABOUT US WHO FOR CONTACT WHERE LINKS FOOD FOR SHABBOS SHARING WHAT WE DO EACH SHABBOS SHABBOS LIGHT WEEKLY CONTENT SONGS - THE MUSIC
 

July 16

 

 

Short version

 

Challah dips wine drinks candles

 

SINGING

 

 Women win the right to inherit land  

After the death of the idolatrous Israelites, God told Moses to take a count of the entire community of the sons of Israel from twenty years old and upward, according to their families. Each of the families was counted and numbered as God had commanded.

After the people were counted, God told Moses, "The land shall be divided as an inheritance to the people according to the number of names in a family. To the numerous, you shall give a large inheritance, and to the few, a small inheritance. This land shall be divided into lots and it shall be given to the people as a possession according to the names of the tribes of the fathers."

Now during this census and apportionment of land, the five daughters of Zelophechad approached Moses and Eleazar, the priest, and spoke in front of the chieftains and the entire community in the entrance of the Tent of Appointed Meeting. They said, "Our father died in the wilderness. He was not one of those who banded together against God. He was not among Korach's allies, but he died because of his own sin, and he had no sons. Why should the name of our father disappear just because he did not have a son? Please give us a possession too, along with our father’s brothers."

Moses brought their claim before God. And God responded, "The daughters of Zelophechad are correct. You shall give them, according to the legal right of males, a hereditary possession, and you shall ensure that their father's inheritance comes to them. And to the children of Israel, you shall say: if a man dies and he has no son, you shall ensure that his inheritance passes to his daughter. If he has no daughter, you shall give his inheritance to his brothers. If he has no brothers, you shall give his inheritance to his kin that is closest to him from among his family. This shall remain for Israel as a legal norm."

SINGING

 

SAS: Nice, this one. God gives women the right to inherit land. As long as there are no brothers, that is.

MS:  I notice you can’t simply praise the egalitarian nature of this community and the fairness with which God deals with all his people. You have to put in a snide remark about the brothers.

SAS:  Well, actually, I think it’s quite astonishing that all these years ago, the people of Israel acknowledged a law that allowed women to inherit land. I agree. It sounds rather different from the customs of the time, as far as we know about them. Which makes me think it was added by later law-makers. Be that as it may, that’s still a very progressive attitude. I’m simply pointing out that women were not regarded as equal to men, despite the fact that in the absence of brothers, they could inherit the family property.

MS: Well, do you not see that this is, in fact, very clever? Land stays in a family. This is good for stability and the security of families.

SAS: Well, does this mean that if these women are married or marry later, that the land goes to their husbands’ families? There’s nothing very stable about that. Names get wiped out and land changes owners.

MS: The law is just and fair. God gave the land to the children of Israel, not just the men of the community.

SAS: Ok, but if a poor girl has brothers, she will not get her family’s land.

MS:Her husband will take care of her. This is designed so that land always has a legal owner. The implications for Jewish laws of inheritance are enormous. Women left without men will be entitled to their own land. It’s a wonderful law, Sigmund. What’s your problem with it?
SAS:  My problem is this: whose land is this we’re talking about here? God says it’s the land he is giving to the children of Israel. But they are not yet in the Promised Land. So the land is yet to be acquired. And presumably it belongs to someone else, who the Children of Israel, under God’s good guidance, will rout. This is a land grab, Methuselah. The land is not theirs to have. And I still have the problem that women cannot inherit alongside their brothers.

SINGING

The Eichmann Trial 

On April 11, 1961, the trial of Adolf Eichmann began in Jerusalem. There were calls outside Israel for the trial to be held by international tribunal. Others wanted him tried in Germany. Israel, however, felt it had the responsibility and the right to try Eichmann, and educate the world about the Holocaust at the same time.

 

15 criminal charges were laid including crimes against humanity, crimes against the Jewish people and membership of an outlawed organisation. Eichmann sat in a bulletproof glass booth in a courtroom presided over by three judges. The Knesset (the Israeli parliament) passed a law allowing a foreigner to defend Eichmann – the role fell to the German, Dr. Robert Servatius, and Israel paid the $30,000 fee.

 

Witnesses testified to Eichmann’s role in the transportation of Jews to death camps. Testimony was led that the deceased Hermann Goering had stated that it was Eichmann who decided where and when the transported Jews would die. Eichmann himself testified, saying he did not dispute the facts of the Holocaust. He relied on the same defense as other Nazis at the Nuremberg Trials – he was merely following orders. Further, he said he was responsible for transporting Jews, not killing them.

 

During the trial, Eichmann explicitly denied being anti-Semitic and stated that he had disagreed with the extreme anti-Semitism of certain of his former colleagues. He claimed to have subscribed to Jewish journals and to have purchased the Encyclopedia Judaica.  When asked if he felt guilty for the deaths of millions of Jews, he replied: “Legally not, but in the human sense... yes, for I am guilty of having deported them.” 

 

Eichmann’s body was cremated in a specially designed oven and his ashes scattered over the Mediterranean. 

 

SINGING

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        A friend you have to buy; enemies you get for nothing.

·        Truth is heavy, so few people carry it.

·        Commit a sin twice and it will not seem a crime.

·        Don’t be so humble – you’re not that great! (Golda Meir)

·        Money is a soap that removes the worst stains.

 

 

SINGING

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

 

S.J. Perelman (1904-1979) 

British raconteur and comic writer Frank Muir described Sidney Joseph Perelman as the best American comic author of all time. Also an author and screenwriter, Perelman won most of his acclaim as a writer of short comic pieces in the New Yorker. He had a celebrated sense of wordplay, a fine satirical edge and a delightful sense of the absurd. Perelman co-scripted the Marx Brothers films Horse Feathers and Monkey Business. He also co-wrote the Academy Award-winning screenplay of the 1956 film Around the World in 80 Days. Together with Ogden Nash, he wrote the book of the Nash-Kurt Weil musical One Touch of Venus. Perelman is widely credited with swaying popular opinion regarding Joseph Heller’s Catch 22, and he was a major inspiration for Woody Allen.  

 

a.k.a Parshat Pinchas (Numbers 25:10 - 30:1) 

 Women win the right to inherit land  

God became very angry with the people of Israel for consorting with foreign women and worshipping a foreign deity. Pinchas, Aaron's grandson, already renowned as a zealot, appeased God's anger over this idolatry by killing an Israelite who was flaunting his sexual activities with a Midianite woman. 

God said to Moses, "The priest Pinchas diverted my anger away from the people of Israel by making sure that my name was avenged among them.  Now I shall not destroy them. And to him and his descendants I will give my covenant of peace, and eternal priesthood.”

After the death of the idolatrous Israelites, God told Moses to take a count of the entire community of the sons of Israel from twenty years old and upward, according to their families. Each of the families was counted and numbered as God had commanded.

After the people were counted, God told Moses, "The land shall be divided as an inheritance to the people according to the number of names in a family. To the numerous, you shall give a large inheritance, and to the few, a small inheritance. This land shall be divided into lots and it shall be given to the people as a possession according to the names of the tribes of the fathers."

Now during this census and apportionment of land, the five daughters of Zelophechad approached Moses and Eleazar, the priest, and spoke in front of the chieftains and the entire community in the entrance of the Tent of Appointed Meeting. They said, "Our father died in the wilderness. He was not one of those who banded together against God. He was not among Korach's allies, but he died because of his own sin, and he had no sons. Why should the name of our father disappear just because he did not have a son? Please give us a possession too, along with our father’s brothers."

Moses brought their claim before God. And God responded, "The daughters of Zelophechad are correct. You shall give them, according to the legal right of males, a hereditary possession, and you shall ensure that their father's inheritance comes to them. And to the children of Israel, you shall say: if a man dies and he has no son, you shall ensure that his inheritance passes to his daughter. If he has no daughter, you shall give his inheritance to his brothers. If he has no brothers, you shall give his inheritance to his kin that is closest to him from among his family. This shall remain for Israel as a legal norm."

Then God said to Moses, "Go to the Mountain of Transitions and look at the land that I have given to the people of Israel. And when you have seen it, you too shall be gathered to your people as your brother Aaron was gathered. For you disobeyed me in the wilderness of Tzin."

Moses answered God, saying "Let God appoint a man over the community who will lead them so that the community of God should not be like sheep who have no shepherd. "And God said to Moses, "Take Joshua, son of Nun, a man of spirit, lean your hand upon him and give him your authority and present him to Eleazar, the priest, and to the entire community, and command him before their eyes. You will thus pass some of your prestige to him so that the entire community will obey him." Moses did as God had commanded.

God spoke to Moses and commanded him to have the children of Israel bring offerings to God in each season of appointed meeting. He instructed him in detail about the kinds of burnt offerings, homage offerings and ascent offerings for each of the festivals, including Passover, the New Moon, the Festival of Weeks (Shavuot) and the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur). He also instructed him as to the kinds of offerings required for the Sabbath. Each offering, on the Sabbath or a festival, whether of animal sacrifice, flour, incense, libations or human rest, was to be made in order to show the people’s acceptance of and compliance to God’s will. Moses explained these exact offerings to the Children of Israel according to God’s instructions.

 

History 

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

The Eichmann Trial 

On April 11, 1961, the trial of Adolf Eichmann began in Jerusalem. There were calls outside Israel for the trial to be held by international tribunal. Others wanted him tried in Germany. Israel, however, felt it had the responsibility and the right to try Eichmann, and educate the world about the Holocaust at the same time.

 

15 criminal charges were laid including crimes against humanity, crimes against the Jewish people and membership of an outlawed organisation. Eichmann sat in a bulletproof glass booth in a courtroom presided over by three judges. The Knesset (the Israeli parliament) passed a law allowing a foreigner to defend Eichmann – the role fell to the German, Dr. Robert Servatius, and Israel paid the $30,000 fee.

 

Witnesses testified to Eichmann’s role in the transportation of Jews to death camps. Testimony was led that the deceased Hermann Goering had stated that it was Eichmann who decided where and when the transported Jews would die. Eichmann himself testified, saying he did not dispute the facts of the Holocaust. He relied on the same defense as other Nazis at the Nuremberg Trials – he was merely following orders. Further, he said he was responsible for transporting Jews, not killing them.

 

During the trial, Eichmann explicitly denied being anti-Semitic and stated that he had disagreed with the extreme anti-Semitism of certain of his former colleagues. He claimed to have subscribed to Jewish journals and to have purchased the Encyclopedia Judaica.  When asked if he felt guilty for the deaths of millions of Jews, he replied: “Legally not, but in the human sense... yes, for I am guilty of having deported them.” 

 

 

Commentary on the 41st parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: Nice, this one. God gives women the right to inherit land. As long as there are no brothers, that is.

MS:  I notice you can’t simply praise the egalitarian nature of this community and the fairness with which God deals with all his people. You have to put in a snide remark about the brothers.

SAS:  Well, actually, I think it’s quite astonishing that all these years ago, the people of Israel acknowledged a law that allowed women to inherit land. I agree. It sounds rather different from the customs of the time, as far as we know about them. Which makes me think it was added by later law-makers. Be that as it may, that’s still a very progressive attitude. I’m simply pointing out that women were not regarded as equal to men, despite the fact that in the absence of brothers, they could inherit the family property.

MS: Well, do you not see that this is, in fact, very clever? Land stays in a family. This is good for stability and the security of families.

SAS: Well, does this mean that if these women are married or marry later, that the land goes to their husbands’ families? There’s nothing very stable about that. Names get wiped out and land changes owners.

MS: The law is just and fair. God gave the land to the children of Israel, not just the men of the community.

SAS: Ok, but if a poor girl has brothers, she will not get her family’s land.

MS:Her husband will take care of her. This is designed so that land always has a legal owner. The implications for Jewish laws of inheritance are enormous. Women left without men will be entitled to their own land. It’s a wonderful law, Sigmund. What’s your problem with it?
SAS:  My problem is this: whose land is this we’re talking about here? God says it’s the land he is giving to the children of Israel. But they are not yet in the Promised Land. So the land is yet to be acquired. And presumably it belongs to someone else, who the Children of Israel, under God’s good guidance, will rout. This is a land grab, Methuselah. The land is not theirs to have. And I still have the problem that women cannot inherit alongside their brothers.

MS:  I don’t think you will ever understand it, Sigmund. In this way, everyone is taken care of, and provided for. You are putting trivial ideological problems in the way of communal happiness.

SAS: Hmmm. Trivial ideological problems, eh? How about another one, then? God is about to take revenge on Moses for disobeying him. Never mind all that Moses has been through to broker good relations between the people and God, when all of them have been unreasonable and violent. Never mind what Moses has had to tolerate in the way of abuse from God and the people. Never mind that Moses didn’t want this job in the first place. No, Moses has led the children of Israel on this 40-year jaunt to the Promised Land, and God is going to let him look at it, and then snatch him off into the arms of his people. What a life-time achievement for Moses!

MS:  You never get it, do you? Moses has been devoted to God. He has been a dedicated and committed servant. He has been God’s appointed messenger, and the leader of the people. He understands that he too has to be punished for disobeying and challenging the word of the Lord. He accepts this; he doesn’t challenge it. He cares only that the people should have a good and strong leader. This is what he asks God to ensure, so that the people can follow the word of God.

SAS:  This is what I can’t accept. How can you? How can you believe that this is the way things should be? Why should we see God’s treatment of Moses as deserved? Just because Moses does? He only does because he’s bloody terrified. He has seen what God can do and he knows when his time is up. I think it’s a terrible story. I think it sends the wrong message to generations of people, and warps them emotionally.

MS:  Oh Sigmund! It sends the right message! God is all powerful and we Jews should obey him, love him, worship him, and he will protect us and hold us in his everlasting love. The story is awesome. Moses has had 40 years of God’s love, and the Israelites have been given many chances to maintain their chosen status, because of Moses’ love for them and love for God.

SAS: Very loftily expressed. I will leave you with a final question as a challenge to such misplaced loftiness. The commandment, “Thou shalt not kill” – did it apply to the priest Pinchas, for whom our parsha is named, or did it not?

MS: Pinchas acted from a sense of righteous and holy anger. The man he killed had betrayed the people, and his actions – if imitated – would have led to the destruction of the community. Do I really need to spell out all the ways in which consorting with foreign women and worshipping foreign gods would have ruptured the social and moral fabric of the community?

SAS: No, no, you needn’t. And that isn’t what I asked. My question was about the act of murder and whether God sometimes condones it. Obviously he does.

MS: This was not murder – it was divine retribution through the agency of a zealous priest.

SAS: “Thou shalt not kill – except when thou shalt!” Well, that’s easy to follow! Goodbye, Methuselah.

 

History 

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

The Eichmann Trial 

On April 11, 1961, the trial of Adolf Eichmann began in Jerusalem. There were calls outside Israel for the trial to be held by international tribunal. Others wanted him tried in Germany. Israel, however, felt it had the responsibility and the right to try Eichmann, and educate the world about the Holocaust at the same time.

 

15 criminal charges were laid including crimes against humanity, crimes against the Jewish people and membership of an outlawed organisation. Eichmann sat in a bulletproof glass booth in a courtroom presided over by three judges. The Knesset (the Israeli parliament) passed a law allowing a foreigner to defend Eichmann – the role fell to the German, Dr. Robert Servatius, and Israel paid the $30,000 fee.

 

Witnesses testified to Eichmann’s role in the transportation of Jews to death camps. Testimony was led that the deceased Hermann Goering had stated that it was Eichmann who decided where and when the transported Jews would die. Eichmann himself testified, saying he did not dispute the facts of the Holocaust. He relied on the same defense as other Nazis at the Nuremberg Trials – he was merely following orders. Further, he said he was responsible for transporting Jews, not killing them.

 

During the trial, Eichmann explicitly denied being anti-Semitic and stated that he had disagreed with the extreme anti-Semitism of certain of his former colleagues. He claimed to have subscribed to Jewish journals and to have purchased the Encyclopedia Judaica.  When asked if he felt guilty for the deaths of millions of Jews, he replied: “Legally not, but in the human sense... yes, for I am guilty of having deported them.” 

 

Depositions from former high-ranking Nazis did not support the image of Eichmann as an unenthusiastic functionary; on the contrary, he was depicted as a National Socialist zealot and a party extremist eager to please the Fuehrer. 

 

Testimony was heard for 14 weeks and the trial ended on 14 August, 1961. The three judges then deliberated and eventually handed down their verdict on 11 December – Eichmann was found guilty on all counts. On 15 December the court imposed the death penalty. 

 

Eichmann appealed the verdict on issues of law, and claimed protection under the principle of “Acts of State”. On 29 May, Israel’s Supreme Court rejected the appeal. It stated: “Eichmann received no superior orders at all. He was his own superior and he gave all orders in matters that concerned Jewish affairs... the so-called Final Solution would never have assumed the infernal forms of the flayed skin and tortured flesh of millions of Jews without the fanatical zeal and the unquenchable blood thirst of the appellant and his associates.” 

 

Israeli president Yitzhak Ben-Zvi rejected Eichmann’s appeal for clemency after considering the appeal in solitude for a day. On 31 May, 1962, just before midnight, Eichmann was hanged. 

 

Israel opposes the death penalty and this is the only civil execution so far carried out in Israel. 

 

Eichmann’s last words are quoted by Holocaust historian David Cesarani as follows: “Long live Germany. Long live Argentina. Long live Austria. These are the three countries with which I have been most connected and which I will not forget. I greet my wife, my family, and my friends. I am ready. We'll meet again soon, as is the fate of all men. I die believing in God.” 

 

Eichmann’s body was cremated in a specially designed oven and his ashes scattered over the Mediterranean. 

 

Hannah Arendt, who reported on the trial for the New Yorker, wrote that Eichmann had neither a psychopathic nor noticeably anti-Semitic personality. He represented the “Banality of Evil”. In her book, she did not absolve him of guilt but instead argued that he had abdicated his responsibility to make correct moral choices. David Cesarani argued, contra Arendt, that Eichmann was enormously anti-Semitic. 

 

Here follows a discussion on this historical segment by Dad, Chaya and Ben. 

 

CHAYA: My impression is that this was something of a show-trial with news programs allowed to broadcast the proceedings live. Israel had a point to make and they made sure it was made in full view of the world.

BEN: And why not? If ever there was a case of justice served, this was it.

DAD: I think Chaya means that the trial served a symbolic purpose over and above the issue of meting out justice to a Nazi murderer.

CHAYA: I guess that is what I mean. Look, the trial kept alive the truth about the Holocaust. It also highlighted the idea that Israel meant business and would champion its own interests at every opportunity. Further, a message was loudly and clearly sent that Simon Wiesenthal and his Nazi hunters were going to make life difficult for Hitler’s men hiding out in Argentina and other South American countries.

DAD: There is an interesting philosophical and political problem here. Israel only came into existence after Eichmann’s crimes were committed. He certainly committed crimes against Jews and against humanity. Did he commit crimes against Israel or its people? How could he have?

BEN: That’s a minor legal point and doesn’t affect charges of crimes against humanity or crimes against Jews. The case does, however, underline the importance of Israel’s existence. There was now a political and geographical entity that could act on behalf of the Jewish people worldwide. Few would dispute that Israel fulfilled its role here.

DAD: Most would agree until we reach the part about the death penalty. We discussed this last week and pointed out that Israel was involved in a contradiction here. It opposed the death penalty and yet executed Eichmann. Did you have any further thoughts about this during the week?  

BEN: Yes! I see no real problem here. Exceptional cases call for unusual measures.

CHAYA: I tend to believe that a principle is a principle and there would have been no shame in letting Eichmann rot in jail. Nevertheless, we are talking about a man who facilitated the Holocaust. There is no room for sympathy here, and I doubt anyone has lost any sleep over Eichmann’s sentence and execution.

DAD: Agreed. Certainly his “just following orders” defense was a travesty and a morally pathetic excuse for his enthusiastic implementation of the Final Solution.

BEN: Of course! It is ridiculous to say he merely transported Jews to a death he knew awaited them, but did not kill anyone. He took them to their deaths! He led them to slaughter and he was just as responsible as the executioners.

CHAYA: Well, we are all in agreement for once.

BEN: I find it disgusting that Eichmann died with the name of God on his lips. How could a man who effectively killed millions profess faith when he violated every fundamental principle of religion?

DAD: Come on, Ben, that’s not a hard one! We have seen, time and again, how religious people often compartmentalize their minds, and cannot see the fundamental contradictions in the way they think and act.

 

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        A friend you have to buy; enemies you get for nothing.

·        Truth is heavy, so few people carry it.

·        Commit a sin twice and it will not seem a crime.

·        Don’t be so humble – you’re not that great! (Golda Meir)

·        Money is a soap that removes the worst stains.

 

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

 

S.J. Perelman (1904-1979) 

British raconteur and comic writer Frank Muir described Sidney Joseph Perelman as the best American comic author of all time. Also an author and screenwriter, Perelman won most of his acclaim as a writer of short comic pieces in the New Yorker. He had a celebrated sense of wordplay, a fine satirical edge and a delightful sense of the absurd. Perelman co-scripted the Marx Brothers films Horse Feathers and Monkey Business. He also co-wrote the Academy Award-winning screenplay of the 1956 film Around the World in 80 Days. Together with Ogden Nash, he wrote the book of the Nash-Kurt Weil musical One Touch of Venus. Perelman is widely credited with swaying popular opinion regarding Joseph Heller’s Catch 22, and he was a major inspiration for Woody Allen.  

 

Song 

 

We will now sing a traditional song to conclude our Shabbat celebration. You have a copy of the words, so please join in as we sing.

 

The song is sung

 

Farewell and an Invitation

 

Thank you for coming together to share our Shabbat. May you go out into the new week with renewed strength, confidence and happiness.

 

We now cordially invite you to join us for some coffee and cake.

 

 

 

HOW TO SING THE SONGS
ADON OLAM WORDS
Adon Olam David Solid Gould & The Temple Rockers
ALL MEN ARE BROTHERS
ALLE BRUDER SONG
ALLE BRIDER SONG
AL KOL ELEH WORDS
AL KOL ELEH
BASHANA words
BASHANA SONG
BEI MIR BIST DU SHEYN
BEI MIR BIST DU SCHEYN SONG
BMBDS song
CHIRIBIM WORDS
CHIRIBIM Song
DAYENU WORDS
DAYENU SONG ENGLISH
DAYENU SONG
DONNA DONNA
DONNA DONNA SONG
HALLELUYA
HALELUJA KARAOKE
HATIKVA
HATIKVA SONG
HATIKVA SONG
DAYENU
HATIKVA WORDS
HATIKVA SONG 1
HAVA NAGILA WORDS
HAVA NAGILA SONG
HAVA NAGILA KARAOKE
HAVEINU SHALOM ALEICHEM
HEVENU SHALOM ALEICHEM WORDS
HEVENU SHALOM ALECHEM SONG
HINEH MA TOV WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD KARAOKE IVRIT
JERUSALEM THE GOLD SONG
JERUSALEM THE GOLD JARAOKE
MAYIM MAYIM WORDS
MAYIM MAYIM DANCE
OIF'N PRIPITSCHOK song
OSE SHALOM
OSE SHALOM SONG
PAPI ROS'N
PAPIROS'N SONG
PARTISAN SONG 1
PARTISAN SONG
PARTISAN SONG MUSIC
RABBI ELIMELEKH
RABBI ELIMELEKH SONG
AS DER REBE SINGT
AS DER REBBE SINGT LEONARD COHEN
AS DER REBBE SINGT SONG
RAISINS WITH ALMONDS WORDS
SIMANTOV U MAZELTOV WORDS
SIMAN TOV MUSIC
MAZELTOV CLARINET
TUMBALALAIKA WORDS
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA 4
TZENA TZENA The Weavers
TZENA TZENA WORDS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
HATIKVA STREISAND
HATIKVA STREISAND
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
YO EN ESTANDO - SEPHARDIC
ELIYAHU SEPHARDIC
SEPHARDIC SONG
SEPHARDIC SONG 3
Sholem Aleichem Susan Allen
Shalom Aleichem Susan Allen
OTHER VERSIONS OF SONGS
DUVID CROCKET WORDS
DUVID CROCKET MICKEY KATZ
MODERN PASSOVER SONGS
This will help you find yourself]