THE GOOD SHABBOS COMMUNITY

ENJOYING YOUR JEWISH HERITAGE THROUGH FOOD, FACTS AND FUN - SHABBAT SHALOM

 

 CHALLAH, WINE,  CANDLES , READ A LITTLE, TALK A LITTLE AND SING

TO ACT OR NOT TO ACT BLOG HOME WHY ABOUT US WHO FOR CONTACT WHERE LINKS FOOD FOR SHABBOS SHARING WHAT WE DO EACH SHABBOS SHABBOS LIGHT WEEKLY CONTENT SONGS - THE MUSIC
 

August 6

Short version

 

Challah dips wine drinks candles

 

SINGING

 

Moses Summarises Recent History

In the 11th month of the 40th year after the Exodus, Moses summarised for the people all that God had told them. We were then ordered to turn back and go into the desert on the way to the Red Sea.  

“Then you all replied that you had sinned and would do battle as God had commanded. But God said his support had now been withdrawn. And so it came about that you were defeated and limped home in anguish. 

“A long stay in Kadesh Barnea followed this defeat. 

“After that we headed for the desert on the way to the Red Sea, and made our way around the hill country of Seir. 

“God then told us to turn north. For 38 years we travelled and eventually the entire generation of fighting men had died out. 

“Then God commanded us to pass through the land of the Ammonites peacefully. God, however, commanded us to take possession of the land of Sihon the Amorite, king of Heshbon. 

“As it happened, I sent word to Sihon that we wished to pass through his land peacefully, but God had hardened his heart so that he resisted us. He then engaged us in battle and was defeated. We destroyed all his towns and left no survivors. 

“We took with us livestock and plunder. 

“The land of the Ammonites we did not touch because God had promised it to the descendants of Lot. 

“Then we marched onwards and were met by the army of Og, King of Bashan. Again we prevailed, destroying their 60 cities, killing all the inhabitants, and making off with plunder. 

“Captured land, which included Gilead, was divided up on a tribal basis. 

“The soldiers of the people, however, were not permitted to settle yet but had to remain mobilized for further campaigns of conquest. 

 

SINGING

 

 Commentary on the 43rd parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament.

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: A summary of events never goes amiss, Methuselah. I appreciate your didactic motives even if I’m a little bored with you rehashing all this stuff.

MS: You even find fault with a summary?

SAS: Actually I’m pleased that you’ve summarized all this core material at the start of Deuteronomy because it gives me a chance to summarize what’s wrong with your bible.

MS:  God spare me this!

SAS: I’ll be succinct. Firstly, I think it’s preposterous that any deity, let alone ours, can sanction conquest and slaughter. People living peacefully in a place should be left alone. You can’t just turn up in a place and say, “God has given this land to us” and then murder all the boys and take the women and girls into captivity once you’ve obliterated their army. 

MS: The people of Israel only attacked those whose hearts were hardened against God’s commands. 

SAS: According to you, God himself hardened their hearts so they weren’t even agents of their own destruction. The whole thing was a set up!

 

SINGING

 

History

 

Operation Yonatan

 

The Entebbe Raid, originally codenamed Operation Thunderball and later Operation Yonatan, was a lightning rescue mission carried out, in Uganda, by the Israeli Defense Forces. The audacity of the mission, along with its remarkable success, has made it a key event in modern Jewish history.

 

On 27 June 1976, Air France Flight 139 en route from Tel Aviv to Paris via Athens was hijacked by two Palestinians and two Germans. The Palestinians were from the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine and the Germans from the Revolutionary Cells (RZ). The plane refueled in Libya and then took off for Entebbe Airport in Uganda. There the four hijackers were joined by three others. They were aided and abetted by pro-Palestinian forces loyal to Ugandan president Idi Amin. The hijackers demanded the release of 40 Palestinians jailed in Israel and 13 other revolutionaries held in other countries.

 

Four C-130 Hercules planes took off for Entebbe followed by two Boeing 707 jets. Israeli forces landed and commandos stormed the terminal. Commander Yonatan Netanyahu was killed early in the operation, the only Israeli commando killed in the swoop. Five others were wounded.

Three hostages were killed in the confusion but the rest at the airport were rescued and whisked off to the waiting planes. Ugandan soldiers fired on the Israelis and paid a heavy price in casualties. The assault lasted only 30 minutes and after 53 minutes the mission was over and the planes airborne. All seven hijackers at Entebbe were killed.

 

Of 105 hostages, three were killed and 10 wounded. They were flown to Israel via Nairobi.

A 75-year-old Jewish hostage, Dora Bloch, became the fourth hostage to die after being murdered by Amin’s soldiers in a Ugandan hospital.

 

 

The United Nations Security Council did not condemn the raid, and Israeli ambassador Chaim Herzog said Israel was proud of its actions in defense of human freedom.

 

SINGING

Sayings

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

·        In the facades we put on for others we demonstrate our potential; through our children we reveal our reality.” (Lawrence Kelemen) 

·        “If you believe you can damage, believe you can fix.” (Rebbe Nachman of Breslov) 

·        Where there’s honey, there are flies.

·        After nine months the secret comes out.

·        If you ever need a helping hand, you’ll find one at the end of your arm.

 

SINGING

Celebration of Great Lives

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Karl Marx (1818-1883)

This philosopher, economist, political theorist and revolutionary is known as the father of communism. Along with Friedrich Engels, he published The Manifesto of the Communist Party in 1848. Das Kapital, edited by Engels, was published in 1867. Marx saw history in terms of class struggle and argued that capitalism involved internal tensions that would lead to its demise. He prophesied that capitalism would give way to socialism and eventually a classless society. Pure communism would arise following a period called “the dictatorship of the proletariat”. His work created the foundation for the communist regimes of the 20th century. Both of Marx’s parents were Jewish, but the family converted to Christianity so that his father could continue his legal career in Prussia. Some scholars claim there is evidence of anti-Semitism in Marx but others deny this. Marx is one of the best-known Jewish atheists.

 

SINGING

Joseph Trumpeldor (1880-1920)

Born in Russia, Trumpeldor trained as a dentist before joining the army. During the Russo-Japanese War, he lost his left arm during the siege of Port Arthur. He continued serving his country in spite of this serious handicap. Imprisoned by the Japanese, he started printing a newspaper on Jewish affairs. After the war he received four decorations for bravery including the Cross of St. George. In 1906 he became the first Jewish soldier to become an officer. After commencing law studies, Trumpeldor and a group of young Zionists immigrated to Palestine in 1911. With Ze’ev Jabotinsky, he developed the idea of the Jewish Legion and in 1915 he helped establish the Zion Mule Corps. This laid an early basis for the Israeli Defense Forces. During World War 1, Trumpeldor was wounded in the Battle of Gallipoli. After the Zion Mule Corps were disbanded he returned to Petrograd and established the HeHalutz, a youth organisation that prepared immigrants for aliyah. He then returned to Palestine and helped establish the Zionist Socialist movement. Trumpeldor was killed in 1920 at Tel Hai following a flare up with local Shiites. He has come to symbolize Jewish self-defense and his life is commemorated every year on the 11th of Adar.

 

SINGING

 

LONG VERSION

Parshat Devarim

 

a.k.a Moses Summarises Recent History  (Deuteronomy 1.1 – 3.22)

In the 11th month of the 40th year after the Exodus, Moses summarised for the people all that God had told them. “At Horeb, God told us we had stayed at the mountain long enough and we should push forward into the land of the Amorites and then on to the Promised Land of Canaan, and take possession of it.

“I told you that I couldn’t carry the burden of leadership alone and asked you to choose leaders from among the 12 tribes. This you did.“I told those who were to act as judges to act wisely and impartially.“So we approached the land of the Amorites and I gave the command for it to be conquered. Our spies reported that the land was good. Yet there were mutterings in the camp and fears were expressed that the Amorites were too strong for us.“You did not trust God, and He was angered by this and said that no one of this evil generation would see the Promised Land except Caleb, son of Jephunneh.“I was blamed too, and God told me I would not enter the Promised Land either. Instead, Joshua, son of Nun, my right-hand man, would enter it later with our young generation of children. We were then ordered to turn back and go into the desert on the way to the Red Sea.  

“Then you all replied that you had sinned and would do battle as God had commanded. But God said his support had now been withdrawn. And so it came about that you were defeated and limped home in anguish. 

“A long stay in Kadesh Barnea followed this defeat. 

“After that we headed for the desert on the way to the Red Sea, and made our way around the hill country of Seir. 

“God then told us to turn north. For 38 years we travelled and eventually the entire generation of fighting men had died out. 

“Then God commanded us to pass through the land of the Ammonites peacefully. God, however, commanded us to take possession of the land of Sihon the Amorite, king of Heshbon. 

“As it happened, I sent word to Sihon that we wished to pass through his land peacefully, but God had hardened his heart so that he resisted us. He then engaged us in battle and was defeated. We destroyed all his towns and left no survivors. 

“We took with us livestock and plunder. 

“The land of the Ammonites we did not touch because God had promised it to the descendants of Lot. 

“Then we marched onwards and were met by the army of Og, King of Bashan. Again we prevailed, destroying their 60 cities, killing all the inhabitants, and making off with plunder. 

“Captured land, which included Gilead, was divided up on a tribal basis. 

“The soldiers of the people, however, were not permitted to settle yet but had to remain mobilized for further campaigns of conquest. 

“And God told Joshua to look at how God had delivered two kings into the people’s hands. And he promised him that the army would enjoy the same success in the Promised Land.”  

 

 Commentary on the 43rd parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament.

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: A summary of events never goes amiss, Methuselah. I appreciate your didactic motives even if I’m a little bored with you rehashing all this stuff.

MS: You even find fault with a summary?

SAS: Actually I’m pleased that you’ve summarized all this core material at the start of Deuteronomy because it gives me a chance to summarize what’s wrong with your bible.

MS:  God spare me this!

SAS: I’ll be succinct. Firstly, I think it’s preposterous that any deity, let alone ours, can sanction conquest and slaughter. People living peacefully in a place should be left alone. You can’t just turn up in a place and say, “God has given this land to us” and then murder all the boys and take the women and girls into captivity once you’ve obliterated their army. 

MS: The people of Israel only attacked those whose hearts were hardened against God’s commands. 

SAS: According to you, God himself hardened their hearts so they weren’t even agents of their own destruction. The whole thing was a set up! But leaving such nonsense aside, the rational person can only have sympathy with Sihon and Og, who were doing nothing more than protecting their people and their land from a marauding tribe that had appeared out of nowhere. You have written this so-called history, so you have painted these men as villains and resisters of God’s will. To their own people they were probably heroes trying to protect their people’s interests. 

MS: You are examining history from the limited view of someone who does not see the hand of God in worldly events. If you don’t look with the eyes of faith you cannot see the hand of God at work or see the way a people’s destiny follows a plan and a pattern. You merely see random acts of warfare and acquisition. We are dealing, however, with the most extraordinary march of a people through history to reach a destiny that is an inspiration for all humanity. 

SAS: Well, I agree with that last point in a way, but I don’t see the hand of God in any of it – just a determined, resourceful and well-armed group of people who made their own fortune while believing that an imaginary being was behind it all. 

MS: What happened to our people could not have happened without divine guidance. You’re crazy if you can’t see that. The Exodus was a miracle, our survival in the wilderness was a miracle, our conquering of superior forces was a miracle and our settling in the Promised Land was the final proof of a destiny that was guided every step of the way. 

SAS: Well, you’re assuming that the narrative you’re presenting is actually true, which is not something I accept. The historicity of Moses has also never been established. There’s a professor of archeology in Tel Aviv who says the evidence indicates our people were never in Egypt, didn’t wander in the desert and didn’t conquer the Promised Land militarily either. You’ve got a great story, Methuselah, but it may have no more substance than a wisp of desert sand. 

MS: This blasphemous nonsense is too much to put up with. Pull the rug of history from under out feet and what do we have as a people? 

SAS: Quite a lot, actually. But I’m not negating the significance of Jewish history – real history corroborated by independent accounts. I am merely pointing out that the bits you and your friends cobbled together are extremely “iffy” in places and just plain absurd in others. Deep down, you know it too.

MS: Your scholarly skepticism is a curse! You’re so busy looking at the trees that you can’t see the wood they’re standing in! How sad to live without the perspective of faith! How sad that you fail to see that the Jews have survived against all reasonable odds only because of divine benevolence and obedience to the will of God. We have been hated and we have been subjected to levels of persecution that would have obliterated any other group in similar circumstances. Yet here we are! You talk about reason, but what reasons can there be for Jewish survival in the world other than God’s protection?     

SAS: The courage, resourcefulness and durability of the Jewish people. Although I’ll admit that your inspiring myths did give us a sense of unity and a sense of common purpose. Sometimes pious fabrications have their uses.

MS: Not to mention the guiding laws, customs and rituals that are embedded in the Torah. If you can’t see the usefulness of these things, then you have failed to understand your own people.

SAS: I admire these elements of Judaism immensely. I am moved by what Moses says early on in the parsha – “Judges must act wisely and impartially”. If we leave aside your spurious theology and look at the ethical and legal framework of your scriptures, then we see the greatness of the Jewish mind at work.

MS: That ethical and legalistic mind cannot be divorced from the religious mind that gave birth to it. You can’t pull biblical strands apart my friend, and choose to keep only the strands that suit your preferences. Torah is a tapestry of interrelated elements that do not, and should never, stand alone. The basis for the law is God. The basis for our festivals of renewal and remembrance is God. The basis for our scriptures, our prayers and our songs is God. Eliminate Him, and you unpick the entire fabric and all its threads. Judaism is an entity and God is its unifying force.

SAS: No, the community is its unifying force. God is an optional extra and, from my point of view, he’s an undesirable and unnecessary one.

MS: Whatever it is you practice, my friend, it isn’t Judaism.

SAS: It might be Judaism that you practice, my friend, but it isn’t rational.

 

History 

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

Operation Yonatan 

 

The Entebbe Raid, originally codenamed Operation Thunderball and later Operation Yonatan, was a lightning rescue mission carried out, in Uganda, by the Israeli Defense Forces. The audacity of the mission, along with its remarkable success, has made it a key event in modern Jewish history.

 

On 27 June 1976, Air France Flight 139 en route from Tel Aviv to Paris via Athens was hijacked by two Palestinians and two Germans. The Palestinians were from the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine and the Germans from the Revolutionary Cells (RZ). The plane refueled in Libya and then took off for Entebbe Airport in Uganda. There the four hijackers were joined by three others. They were aided and abetted by pro-Palestinian forces loyal to Ugandan president Idi Amin. The hijackers demanded the release of 40 Palestinians jailed in Israel and 13 other revolutionaries held in other countries.

 

The hijackers threatened to begin killing hostages on 1 July if their demands were not met. They divided their hostages into Jews and Gentiles. The non-Jews were put on another Air France plane and were flown off to freedom. The Jewish hostages were held in the airport’s transit lounge along with the Air France crew that had refused to leave their passengers.

 

Israel negotiated an extension to the deadline – 4 July – and this bought the Israel Defense Forces time to organize a rescue mission, which was approved by the Israeli Cabinet on 3 July.

Four C-130 Hercules planes took off for Entebbe followed by two Boeing 707 jets. Israeli forces landed and commandos stormed the terminal.  Commander Yonatan Netanyahu was killed early in the operation, the only Israeli commando killed in the swoop. Five others were wounded.

Three hostages were killed in the confusion but the rest at the airport were rescued and whisked off to the waiting planes. Ugandan soldiers fired on the Israelis and paid a heavy price in casualties. The assault lasted only 30 minutes and after 53 minutes the mission was over and the planes airborne. All seven hijackers at Entebbe were killed.

 

Of 105 hostages, three were killed and 10 wounded. They were flown to Israel via Nairobi.

A 75-year-old Jewish hostage, Dora Bloch, became the fourth hostage to die after being murdered by Amin’s soldiers in a Ugandan hospital.

 

A factor contributing to the raid’s success was that the building where the hostages had been held had been built by an Israeli company. The Israeli Defense Forces got the blueprints and built a partial replica of the building during its preparations for the mission. Mossad (Israeli Intelligence) supplied key information received by released hostages in Paris.

 

The United Nations Security Council did not condemn the raid, and Israeli ambassador Chaim Herzog said Israel was proud of its actions in defense of human freedom. The raid was humiliating for Amin, who started losing his grip on power and was forced into exile in Saudi Arabia two years later. Before this, however, he authorized a massacre of Kenyans in Uganda because he believed Kenya had collaborated with the Israelis.

 

The raid on Entebbe Airport has been the subject of several films.

 

Here follows a discussion on this historical segment by Dad, Chaya and Ben. 

 

BEN: This has to be one of the greatest moments in Israeli history. Here we have dual acts of terrorism and anti-Semitism combined in one historical outrage by radical groups. But thanks to an amazing operation by the IDF, most of the hostages were rescued. It’s an extraordinary piece of history and a piece of heroism of almost epic proportions.

CHAYA: It’s not just the Jewish dimension that interests me. I am fascinated by the political climate that gave rise to this episode. The 70s laid the groundwork for much of today’s terrorism, what with the PLO, the IRA Provos, the Red Brigades and the Baader-Meinhof Gang causing havoc in selected areas of operation, and then finding common cause when it suited them.

DAD: That’s what we had here, with German left-wing radicals Wilfried Böse and Brigitte Kuhlmann working in tandem with two PLO guerillas on a mission they believed promoted some form of political liberation. 

BEN: Common criminals they were! They used the smokescreen of ideology to justify their criminal acts!

DAD: No, they are accurately seen as political revolutionaries who genuinely believed in their cause and thought they were changing the world for the better. They were deluded individuals who allowed the radical ideologies of the time to grip them in the same way that religious fervor can drive people to commit irrational acts.

BEN: It sounds like you’re making excuses for them. Whatever the zeitgeist, they were autonomous individuals who knew what they were doing and must take full responsibility for their actions.

DAD: Absolutely! But don’t underestimate the political and social climate of the time. The air was thick with extremist thought and revolutionary ideologies. Radicals were sick of talk, and were determined to prove their commitment through action.

BEN: Well, then we should be thankful for the materialism and rampant capitalism of the 80s! It’s far better for young people to have extreme views about making money than about changing the social order through violence!

CHAYA: I guess so, but fortunately young people don’t need to choose between these extremes – there are many other ways of being committed, most of which are nobler and more altruistic than joining revolutionary cells or trying to accumulate a personal fortune at any cost.

DAD: For the extremists of the 70s, opposing capitalism and its corrupting influence was part of the deal. They branded themselves communist and anti-imperialist, and they expressed the view that the denazification of society had been a failure. The irony was that their actions had far more in common with the fascism they said they detested than with any liberation ethic. Let’s turn to Ben’s initial point, though. I think he is right and that this episode shows the Israeli state at its best. The IDF, Mossad and the government knew where their responsibilities lay and they acted with amazing haste and effectiveness. They taught the revolutionaries involved a lesson, and sent a powerful message to other radicals who wanted to play power games with Israel.

CHAYA: The Entebbe raid certainly sent the message, “Don’t mess with Israel’s citizens if you know what’s good for you!”

BEN: It certainly helped to restore the IDF’s image after the Yom Kippur War debacle.

DAD: You’re right about that, Ben. The raid let everyone know that Israel was a powerful state with powerful intelligence, the will to fight its enemies, and the power to defeat them swiftly, mercilessly and heroically.

CHAYA: All that is no doubt true, but I’d prefer to live in a world in which such heroism is not necessary.  Will humanity never learn that violence is not the answer to anything?

DAD: Most people, know that Chaya. The minority, however, need to be taught it and need to know what the repercussions of attempting change through violent means are.  

 

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

·        In the facades we put on for others we demonstrate our potential; through our children we reveal our reality.” (Lawrence Kelemen) 

·        “If you believe you can damage, believe you can fix.” (Rebbe Nachman of Breslov) 

·        Where there’s honey, there are flies. 

·        After nine months the secret comes out.

·        If you ever need a helping hand, you’ll find one at the end of your arm.

 

Celebration of Great Lives

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Karl Marx (1818-1883) 

This philosopher, economist, political theorist and revolutionary is known as the father of communism. Along with Friedrich Engels, he published The Manifesto of the Communist Party in 1848. Das Kapital, edited by Engels, was published in 1867. Marx saw history in terms of class struggle and argued that capitalism involved internal tensions that would lead to its demise. He prophesied that capitalism would give way to socialism and eventually a classless society. Pure communism would arise following a period called “the dictatorship of the proletariat”. His work created the foundation for the communist regimes of the 20th century. Both of Marx’s parents were Jewish, but the family converted to Christianity so that his father could continue his legal career in Prussia. Some scholars claim there is evidence of anti-Semitism in Marx but others deny this. Marx is one of the best-known Jewish atheists. 

 

Joseph Trumpeldor (1880-1920) 

Born in Russia, Trumpeldor trained as a dentist before joining the army. During the Russo-Japanese War, he lost his left arm during the siege of Port Arthur. He continued serving his country in spite of this serious handicap. Imprisoned by the Japanese, he started printing a newspaper on Jewish affairs. After the war he received four decorations for bravery including the Cross of St. George. In 1906 he became the first Jewish soldier to become an officer. After commencing law studies, Trumpeldor and a group of young Zionists immigrated to Palestine in 1911. With Ze’ev Jabotinsky, he developed the idea of the Jewish Legion and in 1915 he helped establish the Zion Mule Corps. This laid an early basis for the Israeli Defense Forces. During World War 1, Trumpeldor was wounded in the Battle of Gallipoli. After the Zion Mule Corps were disbanded he returned to Petrograd and established the HeHalutz, a youth organisation that prepared immigrants for aliyah. He then returned to Palestine and helped establish the Zionist Socialist movement. Trumpeldor was killed in 1920 at Tel Hai following a flare up with local Shiites. He has come to symbolize Jewish self-defense and his life is commemorated every year on the 11th of Adar. 

 

Song

 

We will now sing a traditional song to conclude our Shabbat celebration. You have a copy of the words, so please join in as we sing.

 

The song is sung

 

Farewell and an Invitation

 

Thank you for coming together to share our Shabbat. May you go out into the new week with renewed strength, confidence and happiness.

 

We now cordially invite you to join us for some coffee and cake. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOW TO SING THE SONGS
ADON OLAM WORDS
Adon Olam David Solid Gould & The Temple Rockers
ALL MEN ARE BROTHERS
ALLE BRUDER SONG
ALLE BRIDER SONG
AL KOL ELEH WORDS
AL KOL ELEH
BASHANA words
BASHANA SONG
BEI MIR BIST DU SHEYN
BEI MIR BIST DU SCHEYN SONG
BMBDS song
CHIRIBIM WORDS
CHIRIBIM Song
DAYENU WORDS
DAYENU SONG ENGLISH
DAYENU SONG
DONNA DONNA
DONNA DONNA SONG
HALLELUYA
HALELUJA KARAOKE
HATIKVA
HATIKVA SONG
HATIKVA SONG
DAYENU
HATIKVA WORDS
HATIKVA SONG 1
HAVA NAGILA WORDS
HAVA NAGILA SONG
HAVA NAGILA KARAOKE
HAVEINU SHALOM ALEICHEM
HEVENU SHALOM ALEICHEM WORDS
HEVENU SHALOM ALECHEM SONG
HINEH MA TOV WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD KARAOKE IVRIT
JERUSALEM THE GOLD SONG
JERUSALEM THE GOLD JARAOKE
MAYIM MAYIM WORDS
MAYIM MAYIM DANCE
OIF'N PRIPITSCHOK song
OSE SHALOM
OSE SHALOM SONG
PAPI ROS'N
PAPIROS'N SONG
PARTISAN SONG 1
PARTISAN SONG
PARTISAN SONG MUSIC
RABBI ELIMELEKH
RABBI ELIMELEKH SONG
AS DER REBE SINGT
AS DER REBBE SINGT LEONARD COHEN
AS DER REBBE SINGT SONG
RAISINS WITH ALMONDS WORDS
SIMANTOV U MAZELTOV WORDS
SIMAN TOV MUSIC
MAZELTOV CLARINET
TUMBALALAIKA WORDS
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA 4
TZENA TZENA The Weavers
TZENA TZENA WORDS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
HATIKVA STREISAND
HATIKVA STREISAND
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
YO EN ESTANDO - SEPHARDIC
ELIYAHU SEPHARDIC
SEPHARDIC SONG
SEPHARDIC SONG 3
Sholem Aleichem Susan Allen
Shalom Aleichem Susan Allen
OTHER VERSIONS OF SONGS
DUVID CROCKET WORDS
DUVID CROCKET MICKEY KATZ
MODERN PASSOVER SONGS
This will help you find yourself]