THE GOOD SHABBOS COMMUNITY

ENJOYING YOUR JEWISH HERITAGE THROUGH FOOD, FACTS AND FUN - SHABBAT SHALOM

 

 CHALLAH, WINE,  CANDLES , READ A LITTLE, TALK A LITTLE AND SING

TO ACT OR NOT TO ACT BLOG HOME WHY ABOUT US WHO FOR CONTACT WHERE LINKS FOOD FOR SHABBOS SHARING WHAT WE DO EACH SHABBOS SHABBOS LIGHT WEEKLY CONTENT SONGS - THE MUSIC
 

Short version

 

Challah dips wine drinks candles

 

SINGING

God then laid out the rules to be followed in the Promised Land. 

Firstly, the people of Israel had to smash all the altars to other gods that they encountered. The people of Israel would be directed to places other than these ancient worshiping sites, and there they would hold their religious ceremonies and sacrificial rituals. They were forbidden from doing so at random locations.  

God also reminded them that the blood of sacrificed animals could not be eaten. God ordered the people to honour their priests. He promised the people a period of peace during which they would live in safety. He said he would drive the nations already on the land away. Having taken their land, the people of Israel were not to show any interest in the people’s false gods, or imitate any of their practices. 

God made it clear that he abhorred such practices, especially the action of sacrificing sons and daughters to idols. He made it clear that the people were to follow his rules exactly. He forbade deviation and the invention of rules and practices. 

 

 

 

Commentary on the 47th parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: Ah, Methuselah, Methuselah, so much wisdom and so much nonsense side by side!

MS:  I am not going to let your provocative comments upset me. I demand, instead that you defend that comment with some rational arguments.

SAS: Firstly, the good bits and – to be fair – there are several. I am touched, as always, by the egalitarianism and commitment to the poor, the disadvantaged and the vulnerable. The demand that society’s needy be looked after indicates wisdom and compassion and an already advanced level of social operation.

MS: And the reason is that the rules came from an all-loving and all-knowing God.

SAS: You can believe that if you like. I am also impressed by a system that cancels debts regularly, liberates slaves, and gives provisions to those starting off as free men and women. This sense of charity is heart-warming and inspiring.

MS: Anything else to praise once you’re on the subject? It’s good to hear you appreciate the Torah for a change, even if you don’t recognize its divine source.

SAS: Three more things. I like the establishment of the religious festivals, even if I think that their religious background is nonsense. It is good for a community to have rituals and customs. Nature has its rhythms and cycles, and modern man could learn a lot from the ancient cultures that tapped into these and respected the bounty of the earth. I also applaud the statement by your fictitious God that human sacrifice is barbaric and repugnant. This group worked that one out a lot faster than other cultures. I also say a loud “Amen” to the rule that people should not mutilate or disfigure themselves when mourning the dead.  

 

The first INTIFADA 1987-1993

The First Intifada was an uprising by Palestinians against Israeli rule in Palestinian territories. “Intifada” means “insurrection” or “uprising”. Literally, it means “shaking off”.

Among the reasons for the uprising were Israeli’s hard line administration and an increase in Israeli settlers. Israel was also accused of mass detentions, house demolitions and deportations. There was little land available for new building and unemployment was on the rise. The Intifada also had an economic dimension. The Palestinians wanted economic self-sufficiency instead of economic integration, and resented having to pay taxes to Israel.

Palestinians became increasingly radicalized and a number of actions resulted – boycotts, strikes, barricading of areas and a refusal to pay taxes. On numerous occasions, Palestinian youths threw stones at the Israeli army. More committed radicals threw Molotov Cocktails and hand grenades and occasional firefights broke out too. 1100 Palestinians and 160 Israelis were killed in the uprising

118 Palestinians were killed by fellow Palestinians after being accused of collaborating with Israel and its intelligence forces. Of these 118, two were later declared innocent and were honored as “martyrs of the Palestinian revolution” by the PLO.

In 1991 the Spanish government, supported by the USA and the USSR, held the Madrid Conference aimed at establishing peace between the Israelis and Palestinians. The conference achieved little, but laid the groundwork for subsequent discussions. Israel has said that this conference led to its establishing diplomatic relations with China, India and several Arab countries.

The First Intifada dragged on for two more years. On 13 September 1993, the Oslo Accords were officially signed in Washington by Israel, the PLO, the USA and the USSR. The Accords provided the blueprint for future relations between Israel and the Palestinians. From the Palestinian point of view, the Intifada was successful because it strengthened the identity of the Palestinian people and pushed their agenda into the world spotlight. Further, the PLO came to be recognized as the legitimate representative of the Palestinian people.

Israel came in for unprecedented criticism in the US media, the United Nations and in several European countries. Israel’s control of the West Bank and Gaza Strip became a subject of international concern and condemnation.

 

 

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        Sing to the one whose cart you are riding on

·        Live life without rushing; death won’t be late

·        It is better to be the tail of a lion than the head of a rat

·        If a man is destined to drown, he will drown even in a spoonful of water.

·        We do not see things the way they are but as we are

 

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

 

Solomon Mikhoels (1890-1948)  

Mikhoels was born Shloyme Vovsi in Dvinsk. He left law school in St. Petersburg to join Alexander Granovsky’s Jewish Theater Workshop. It moved to Moscow in 1920 and the Moscow State Jewish Theater was born. The company’s leading actor, Mikhoels became its director in 1928. He played Tevye in Tevye the Milkman (the forerunner of Fiddler on the Roof) and King Lear in a Yiddish translation of Shakespeare’s tragedy. Mikhoels became chairman of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee in 1942. He travelled the world, encouraging Jews to support Stalin and the Soviet Union against Hitler. Things became difficult for Mikhoels after the war when Stalin opposed contact between Soviet Jews and “bourgeois Jews” in non-Communist countries. As an intellectual, Mikhoels was also vulnerable to a Stalinist purge. He witnessed the closure of the Jewish State Theater and he was arrested along with other members of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee. In January 1948 he was beaten to death on Stalin’s orders and his death was disguised as a vehicle hit-and-run. He received a state funeral. In 1983 his daughter, Natalia Vovsi-Mikoels, completed a biography of her father in Hebrew titled, My Father Shlomo Mikhoels: The Life and Death of a Jewish Actor. 

 

LONG VERSION

 

 

 August 27  The wages of apostasy

 

“See, I am setting before you a blessing and a curse,” said God. “You will be blessed if you obey my commands and cursed if you disobey them and turn to other gods. You are about to cross the Jordan into the Promised Land. Visit two mountains after you enter – Mount Gerizim and Mount Ebal. At the former you must recite the blessings I have given you, and at the latter the curses.” 

God then laid out the rules to be followed in the Promised Land. 

Firstly, the people of Israel had to smash all the altars to other gods that they encountered. The people of Israel would be directed to places other than these ancient worshiping sites, and there they would hold their religious ceremonies and sacrificial rituals. They were forbidden from doing so at random locations.  

God also reminded them that the blood of sacrificed animals could not be eaten. God ordered the people to honour their priests. He promised the people a period of peace during which they would live in safety. He said he would drive the nations already on the land away. Having taken their land, the people of Israel were not to show any interest in the people’s false gods, or imitate any of their practices. 

God made it clear that he abhorred such practices, especially the action of sacrificing sons and daughters to idols. He made it clear that the people were to follow his rules exactly. He forbade deviation and the invention of rules and practices. 

If a prophet appeared among the people, making predictions that came to pass, the people shouldn’t follow this person’s invitation to follow other gods. Instead of allowing themselves to fail this test from God, the people had to put the prophet to death for trying to turn the people away from God. Further, if a member of someone’s family suggested turning to other gods, that person should be put to death by stoning – be it a wife, brother, son or daughter. Once the people had heard of this punishment, they wouldn’t be tempted to preach in the same seditionary way. 

If a story emerged that a number of wicked men in a town established by God were leading the people towards false gods, the matter had to be investigated thoroughly. If the allegations proved true, everyone and everything in the town was to be destroyed – the people, the livestock and all accumulated goods, and the town had to remain a ruin forever. 

God told the people not to shave their heads or mutilate themselves when mourning the dead. 

He also identified animals that could and could not be eaten, depending on whether they chewed the cud or had cloven hooves. Sheep, oxen, goats and deer could be eaten, but camels, rabbits and pigs could not. 

Water creatures with fins and scales could be eaten, but not others. God also differentiated between fowl that were clean and unclean. Insects could not be eaten. Animals found dead could not be eaten. A young goat was not to be cooked in its mother’s milk. 

God also ordered that a tenth of a year’s harvest had to be set aside as a tithe. The tithe could only be eaten in God’s presence at a place of his choosing. Every three years, the tithed collection of harvested crops had to be stored in the towns. This was to ensure that the priests, foreigners, the fatherless and the widows could be fed.   

 

At the end of every seven years all debts owing by fellow Israelites had to be cancelled. God also required that there be no poverty-stricken folk among his people. The people were meant to live blessed lives in the land. If somebody did become poor, he should be treated kindly. People should give generously to such a person, and not hold back because the time of cancelling debts was coming near. There would always be some poor people within the community and an ongoing obligation existed to look after them. 

If a fellow Jew became bound to someone as a slave, the person had to be set free in the seventh year. The emancipated person should be sent away with ample supplies of food and drink. 

If the servant wished to continue in service, out of love for the master, that person could be contracted for life through the action of an awl being driven through their earlobe. 

Every year the firstborn of the herd and the flocks had to be set aside. These animals were to be eaten in the presence of God at a place of his choosing. 

God identified three festivals that had to be celebrated yearly. The Passover (Pesach) had to be celebrated in the month of Aviv when God brought the people of Israel out of Egypt. The people were to go to a place designated by God where they would roast an animal at sunset and eat it. They would return to their tents in the morning. Unleavened bread had to be eaten for seven days. 

The Feast of Weeks (Shavuot) was to be held seven weeks after the year’s harvesting had commenced. A freewill offering had to be made to God at a place of his designation in the company of the entire community, including priests, foreigners, widows and the fatherless. 

The Feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot) had to be celebrated for seven days after the year’s produce had been gathered in. This joyful feast had to be celebrated at a place of God’s designation in the company of the entire community. No person could attend these festivals empty handed but had to bring offerings in proportion to their wealth. 

 

Commentary on the 47th parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: Ah, Methuselah, Methuselah, so much wisdom and so much nonsense side by side!

MS:  I am not going to let your provocative comments upset me. I demand, instead that you defend that comment with some rational arguments.

SAS: Firstly, the good bits and – to be fair – there are several. I am touched, as always, by the egalitarianism and commitment to the poor, the disadvantaged and the vulnerable. The demand that society’s needy be looked after indicates wisdom and compassion and an already advanced level of social operation.

MS: And the reason is that the rules came from an all-loving and all-knowing God.

SAS: You can believe that if you like. I am also impressed by a system that cancels debts regularly, liberates slaves, and gives provisions to those starting off as free men and women. This sense of charity is heart-warming and inspiring.

MS: Anything else to praise once you’re on the subject? It’s good to hear you appreciate the Torah for a change, even if you don’t recognize its divine source.

SAS: Three more things. I like the establishment of the religious festivals, even if I think that their religious background is nonsense. It is good for a community to have rituals and customs. Nature has its rhythms and cycles, and modern man could learn a lot from the ancient cultures that tapped into these and respected the bounty of the earth. I also applaud the statement by your fictitious God that human sacrifice is barbaric and repugnant. This group worked that one out a lot faster than other cultures. I also say a loud “Amen” to the rule that people should not mutilate or disfigure themselves when mourning the dead.  

MS: These positive remarks cover only a small portion of the portion. I am therefore expecting a lot of critical comment from you. As usual, you will miss the point with most of it. Perhaps you will have something of value to say for a change.

SAS: Well, let’s begin in general by saying that God’s jealousy is out of control here and we can see him for the green-eyed monster he is. A God who demands the smashing of altars and the removal of all signs of another religious culture is a deity of quite staggering insecurity and intolerance.

MS: You yourself said that human sacrifice was evil. What was worth preserving at these debased Canaanite shrines?

SAS: Everything! Were there no students of history and culture among our people? Was God so rigid that he could not see a third way between worshipping at a Canaanite site and destroying it? We should have allowed the sites to remain as testament to another culture, no matter how inferior it seemed. Those shrines and altars represented a way of life of thousands of people and told their story.

MS: This argument is preposterous! We couldn’t have allowed edifices to pagan gods and pagan lifestyles to stay standing. For one thing, pagans might have tried to congregate there secretly. More importantly, such places caused offense to the one true God.

SAS: That’s what the Taliban in Afghanistan said when they bombed the Buddha statues.

MS: I beg your pardon?

SAS: Just thinking aloud. Now, in the same vein, I reject the right of the Israelites to chase people off the land where they’d lived for ages.

MS: God gave it to the people. It’s as simple as that.

SAS: You can’t invoke the edict of a sky God as a basis for property transference.

MS: The people didn’t have to invoke anything. No negotiations were required. God, in his infinite wisdom, gave the land to them. It was his to give – his property. You are confused because you see the early Canaanites as the owners of the land, but they weren’t. God created the earth and he is its overlord and proprietor. He may give it away as he pleases.

SAS: Yes, but as a supposedly just God, he should issue a decree that seems fair to all parties and follows the laws of natural justice.

MS: Firstly, the Canaanites didn’t believe in the true God so there was no way for them to understand anything that transpired. Secondly, you can’t weigh natural justice against divine justice. Divine justice comes from the mind of God and supersedes any form of justice that exists in our minds.

SAS: But how can we believe in the concept of divine justice when it does not even measure up to our basic understanding of justice? Must we surrender our notions of logic and fairness because someone is telling us that an unseen being has a different one? Forget it! The moment we humans throw out our rationality, we become intellectual suckers ready to embrace any code or principle foisted upon us! If the concept of divine justice doesn’t square with human justice, then it is of no use to anyone.

MS: Stop talking in generalities and give me an example.

SAS: Fine! The example of God telling the people of Israel to kill an entire town of people, and then burn it to the ground along with all its goods and chattels, is insanely cruel and manifestly unjust. Look at the example carefully. God wasn’t saying everyone in the town was a spiritual traitor. What we have, in his example, is a ruling male clique deciding to betray Israel’s heritage and turning to the Canaanite ways. For the apostasy of this group the rest of the men, women, children and animals had to be killed and their town wiped out?

MS: In this hypothetical example the town turns apostate, ignoring God’s instructions – it was made clear that this was not to happen.

SAS: So God would be justified in sanctioning the killing of the townspeople? Even those who were too young or powerless to make decisions? I am appalled that you can believe this.

MS: Think carefully. If God’s rules and warnings were followed, would the case of such a town ever arise? Did it ever arise? God’s rules seem harsh at times but they are designed to make sure that things which shouldn’t happen don’t happen.

SAS: The bible provides ample examples of God’s threats failing to deter people from behaving abominably. No Methuselah, you can’t spin yourself out of this one. In this parsha God adopts an extreme position based on the demands of his insecure ego. Any town where his iron rule wasn’t uniformly obeyed was fair game for complete annihilation. This is typical of your God’s all or nothing stance. It exposes his cruelty and crudity once more.

MS: We do not have the knowledge, wisdom or understanding to question God’s commands. If he issues them, then they are right by their very nature.

SAS: No, we must always judge the alleged words of God critically and rationally. In today’s portion, he is found sorely wanting. Worse, he should be prosecuted for crimes against humanity!

MS: Don’t be absurd. The creator’s rights are absolute. No creature has any judicial claim against the being that gave it life.

SAS: Tell that to parents whose children drag them into parents’ court. What you fail to understand is that God, if there were such a being, would be bound by natural justice. He should no more kill than any human being should.

MS: Both the concept and reality of God eludes you, my friend. God is the very condition of existence. He is antecedent to his creation and beyond its criticism and reproach.

SAS: There we differ 100%. I say He is bound by the very rules he himself created. Judged in accordance with them, he should be put to death.

 

   

History 

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

The First Intifada (1987 – 1993) 

The First Intifada was an uprising by Palestinians against Israeli rule in Palestinian territories. “Intifada” means “insurrection” or “uprising”. Literally, it means “shaking off”.

Among the reasons for the uprising were Israeli’s hard line administration and an increase in Israeli settlers. Israel was also accused of mass detentions, house demolitions and deportations. There was little land available for new building and unemployment was on the rise. The Intifada also had an economic dimension. The Palestinians wanted economic self-sufficiency instead of economic integration, and resented having to pay taxes to Israel.

Palestinians became increasingly radicalized and a number of actions resulted – boycotts, strikes, barricading of areas and a refusal to pay taxes. On numerous occasions, Palestinian youths threw stones at the Israeli army. More committed radicals threw Molotov Cocktails and hand grenades and occasional firefights broke out too. 1100 Palestinians and 160 Israelis were killed in the uprising

118 Palestinians were killed by fellow Palestinians after being accused of collaborating with Israel and its intelligence forces. Of these 118, two were later declared innocent and were honored as “martyrs of the Palestinian revolution” by the PLO. 

No single organization started the Intifada. Community councils played a strong role in coordinating activities. The PLO, from its base in Tunisia, presented itself as the champion of local aspirations. It had the support of groups such as Fatah, the Democratic Front, the Popular Front and the Palestine Communist Party, and quickly came to dominate the Unified Leadership of the Intifada (UNLI).

The match that lit the revolutionary spark was a traffic accident on 8 December 1987 in which an Israeli tank ran into several Palestinians from the Jabalya refugee camp in Gaza City. Four Palestinians were killed and seven injured. The story quickly spread that this event was not, in fact, an accident but was a revenge killing in response to the death by stabbing of a Jewish man in Gaza two days earlier. On 9 December uprisings began in several cities and refugee camps. IDF troops were attacked and responded using riot-control measures.

Israeli defense minister Yitzhak Rabin armed his soldiers with truncheons. He is alleged to have said that Israeli soldiers should “break the bones” of the insurrectionists. On 22 December the UN Security Council condemned Israel in terms of Resolution 605 on account of the number of Palestinian deaths. Israel was held to have breached the terms of the Geneva Convention.

The Swedish chapter of Save the Children claimed that between 23 000 and 30 000 children received medical treatment for injuries during the first two years of the Intifada.

In 1988 the Arab League resolved to support the Intifada financially. In 1989 local committees organized a tax boycott. Israel responded by imposing fines and seizing goods from local factories and shops.

In 1990, 21 Israeli soldiers confessed to having used brutal methods in their quelling of various uprisings.

In 1991 the Spanish government, supported by the USA and the USSR, held the Madrid Conference aimed at establishing peace between the Israelis and Palestinians. The conference achieved little, but laid the groundwork for subsequent discussions. Israel has said that this conference led to its establishing diplomatic relations with China, India and several Arab countries.

The First Intifada dragged on for two more years. On 13 September 1993, the Oslo Accords were officially signed in Washington by Israel, the PLO, the USA and the USSR. The Accords provided the blueprint for future relations between Israel and the Palestinians. From the Palestinian point of view, the Intifada was successful because it strengthened the identity of the Palestinian people and pushed their agenda into the world spotlight. Further, the PLO came to be recognized as the legitimate representative of the Palestinian people.

Israel came in for unprecedented criticism in the US media, the United Nations and in several European countries. Israel’s control of the West Bank and Gaza Strip became a subject of international concern and condemnation.

 

Here follows a discussion on this historical segment by Dad, Chaya and Ben. 

 

CHAYA: It’s difficult to find neutral commentaries about the Intifada. Most writers on the subject seem to take sides. Those who are critical of Israel claim that a popular, unarmed uprising was brutally put down by the IDF. Pro-Israeli commentators emphasize that the Palestinians used Molotov Cocktails, grenades and guns.

DAD: I’ve no doubt that the Palestinians used lethal weapons on occasions just as some members of the IDF used their power to kill wantonly.

BEN: It’s easy to blame Israel for an excessive use of force, but let’s not forget who started the uprising!

CHAYA: Well of course the Palestinians started it but uprisings often happen when foreigners are in charge of a territory. Leaving aside the issue of whether Israel should have been there or not, their rule was always going to be problematic and a rising of tensions was inevitable. Given that backdrop, an Intifada was likely to occur.

DAD: Was it justifiable, though, Chaya?

CHAYA: From the Palestinian point of view it certainly was. The mere fact that Israel had control over these territories was enough reason for some to rise up. Add to that the incidences of detentions, demolitions and deportations and the basis for dissatisfaction increases. Throw in their economic grievances and you have a powder-keg situation just waiting to explode.

BEN: From any civilized point of view, though, rioting is no way to address political grievances!

DAD: Yes, Ben, but the Intifida started as a popular outpouring of anger and indignation. The Palestinians, one could argue, lacked fundamental rights, lacked dignity and lacked the mechanisms to address their problems. So they hit out at the Israeli soldiers enforcing the political status quo.

CHAYA: I think it’s hard to justify the use of weapons such as grenades or Molotov Cocktails, but when the occupying power has guns and tanks, you have a basis for arguing that the use of lethal weapons is defensible.

BEN:  Occupying power? Israel took control of the West Bank and Gaza following the Six Day War in 1967. It had a right to be there as a result of its victory in the war.

DAD: Perhaps, but since the majority of people there were Palestinians, Israel was viewed as an occupying force. When the Oslo Accords made provision for an interim Palestinian Authority in those areas, it began the process of disengagement which eventually led to the Knesset passing the Disengagement Plan in February 2005.

BEN: What was that about, exactly?

DAD: Well, it meant that Israel would withdraw totally from Gaza, and from four settlements in the northern West Bank. Those Israelis who refused to leave were evicted by Israeli security forces. The evictions were completed before the end of September 2005. The withdrawal from Gaza was seen as a victory for Hamas by the Palestinians and the January 2006 election there was won by Hamas. It rejected all agreements with Israel and denied its right to exist. After rockets were fired from Gaza into southern Israeli cities, Israel and Hamas went to war, with Israel invading the territory on January 3rd 2009. It completed its withdrawal on 21st January by which time the war had ended. A UN report accused both sides of war crimes. Hamas remains in power in Gaza. As far as the West Bank is concerned, Israel still controls the larger part of it although 40 percent of it is administered by the Fatah-run Palestinian Authority.

CHAYA: You certainly know your recent history! Now, I read that at the beginning of 2010 the Obama administration in the USA wanted a Palestinian state established within two years. How would that affect Israel’s position in Gaza and the West Bank?

DAD: Who knows?  Firstly, it is unlikely that the US plan will come to fruition within the stipulated time. One sticking point is the time frame for the freezing of Israeli settlements on the West Bank. Israel wants to stop building for six months only.

BEN: At the very least, the Palestinians will want Israel out of the West Bank and Gaza permanently.

DAD: Some prominent Israelis agree with that. In September 2008 former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert declared that the “Greater Israel” was dead and Jews should leave the West Bank prior to Israel officially surrendering the area. Those who left voluntarily should be paid a million shekels, he said.

CHAYA: That view supports my idea that the Intifida was justified. Our control of the West Bank and Gaza was never going to work. Forget the legal and moral arguments. We shouldn’t be there because our presence is anachronistic and impractical.

BEN: I’m not prepared to say that. What about you, Dad?

DAD: I think it’s time to eat.

 

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        Sing to the one whose cart you are riding on

·        Live life without rushing; death won’t be late

·        It is better to be the tail of a lion than the head of a rat

·        If a man is destined to drown, he will drown even in a spoonful of water.

·        We do not see things the way they are but as we are

 

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

 

Solomon Mikhoels (1890-1948)  

Mikhoels was born Shloyme Vovsi in Dvinsk. He left law school in St. Petersburg to join Alexander Granovsky’s Jewish Theater Workshop. It moved to Moscow in 1920 and the Moscow State Jewish Theater was born. The company’s leading actor, Mikhoels became its director in 1928. He played Tevye in Tevye the Milkman (the forerunner of Fiddler on the Roof) and King Lear in a Yiddish translation of Shakespeare’s tragedy. Mikhoels became chairman of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee in 1942. He travelled the world, encouraging Jews to support Stalin and the Soviet Union against Hitler. Things became difficult for Mikhoels after the war when Stalin opposed contact between Soviet Jews and “bourgeois Jews” in non-Communist countries. As an intellectual, Mikhoels was also vulnerable to a Stalinist purge. He witnessed the closure of the Jewish State Theater and he was arrested along with other members of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee. In January 1948 he was beaten to death on Stalin’s orders and his death was disguised as a vehicle hit-and-run. He received a state funeral. In 1983 his daughter, Natalia Vovsi-Mikoels, completed a biography of her father in Hebrew titled, My Father Shlomo Mikhoels: The Life and Death of a Jewish Actor. 

HOW TO SING THE SONGS
ADON OLAM WORDS
Adon Olam David Solid Gould & The Temple Rockers
ALL MEN ARE BROTHERS
ALLE BRUDER SONG
ALLE BRIDER SONG
AL KOL ELEH WORDS
AL KOL ELEH
BASHANA words
BASHANA SONG
BEI MIR BIST DU SHEYN
BEI MIR BIST DU SCHEYN SONG
BMBDS song
CHIRIBIM WORDS
CHIRIBIM Song
DAYENU WORDS
DAYENU SONG ENGLISH
DAYENU SONG
DONNA DONNA
DONNA DONNA SONG
HALLELUYA
HALELUJA KARAOKE
HATIKVA
HATIKVA SONG
HATIKVA SONG
DAYENU
HATIKVA WORDS
HATIKVA SONG 1
HAVA NAGILA WORDS
HAVA NAGILA SONG
HAVA NAGILA KARAOKE
HAVEINU SHALOM ALEICHEM
HEVENU SHALOM ALEICHEM WORDS
HEVENU SHALOM ALECHEM SONG
HINEH MA TOV WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD KARAOKE IVRIT
JERUSALEM THE GOLD SONG
JERUSALEM THE GOLD JARAOKE
MAYIM MAYIM WORDS
MAYIM MAYIM DANCE
OIF'N PRIPITSCHOK song
OSE SHALOM
OSE SHALOM SONG
PAPI ROS'N
PAPIROS'N SONG
PARTISAN SONG 1
PARTISAN SONG
PARTISAN SONG MUSIC
RABBI ELIMELEKH
RABBI ELIMELEKH SONG
AS DER REBE SINGT
AS DER REBBE SINGT LEONARD COHEN
AS DER REBBE SINGT SONG
RAISINS WITH ALMONDS WORDS
SIMANTOV U MAZELTOV WORDS
SIMAN TOV MUSIC
MAZELTOV CLARINET
TUMBALALAIKA WORDS
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA 4
TZENA TZENA The Weavers
TZENA TZENA WORDS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
HATIKVA STREISAND
HATIKVA STREISAND
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
YO EN ESTANDO - SEPHARDIC
ELIYAHU SEPHARDIC
SEPHARDIC SONG
SEPHARDIC SONG 3
Sholem Aleichem Susan Allen
Shalom Aleichem Susan Allen
OTHER VERSIONS OF SONGS
DUVID CROCKET WORDS
DUVID CROCKET MICKEY KATZ
MODERN PASSOVER SONGS
This will help you find yourself]