THE GOOD SHABBOS COMMUNITY

ENJOYING YOUR JEWISH HERITAGE THROUGH FOOD, FACTS AND FUN - SHABBAT SHALOM

 

 CHALLAH, WINE,  CANDLES , READ A LITTLE, TALK A LITTLE AND SING

TO ACT OR NOT TO ACT BLOG HOME WHY ABOUT US WHO FOR CONTACT WHERE LINKS FOOD FOR SHABBOS SHARING WHAT WE DO EACH SHABBOS SHABBOS LIGHT WEEKLY CONTENT SONGS - THE MUSIC
 

August 20 

 

Short version

 

Challah dips wine drinks candles

 

SINGING

Moses sets out the terms

 

Then Moses continued his speech to the Israelites, reminding them of their history and the covenant they had made with God. “If you hear these Ten Commandments and obey them carefully, God will keep this covenant. God will love you and bless you and multiply you. God will bless your children, your soil, grain, wine, oil and animals. You will be blessed more than all the peoples.

“But,” Moses reminded the people “you will have to annihilate many nations; you will not be able to feel any mercy and you will wipe them out so that you will not worship their gods. Worshipping other gods is a danger you will have to be aware of. Do not fear other people or their gods, for your God is a great and awesome God. God will bring the other peoples to your feet and you shall destroy them. And burn the images of their gods.  And do not desire or keep any part of these images, the silver or the gold, because they are an abomination to God.

Moses sets out the terms (Deuteronomy 7:12 - 11:25) 

 

Then Moses continued his speech to the Israelites, reminding them of their history and the covenant they had made with God.  “If you hear these Ten Commandments and obey them carefully, God will keep this covenant. God will love you and bless you and multiply you. God will bless your children, your soil, grain, wine, oil and animals. You will be blessed more than all the peoples.

“But,” Moses reminded the people “you will have to annihilate many nations; you will not be able to feel any mercy and you will wipe them out so that you will not worship their gods. Worshipping other gods is a danger you will have to be aware of. Do not fear other people or their gods, for your God is a great and awesome God. God will bring the other peoples to your feet and you shall destroy them. And burn the images of their gods.  And do not desire or keep any part of these images, the silver or the gold, because they are an abomination to God.

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: Well, here we have it, Methuselah. Your God. Contingent love. “Love me, be grateful and do what I say, or else. I love you, but only if you thank me, love me exclusively and do as I say. I will destroy you if you don’t love me exclusively and unconditionally. Yet, my love for you is entirely conditional on your behaviour”.

MS: As always, you miss the point. God continually, through Moses, reaffirms his commitment to the people, promising to protect them and hold them close. He reminds them of what he has done for them and assures them of a good life in the Promised Land.

SAS: But what an attitude! He’s petulant and a bully. He sounds like a strict and terrible father who will strike his children if they don’t obey him, and that includes groveling and thanking him for bringing them into the world, feeding and clothing them. He reminds the people how strong he is and how he will smite them if they don’t do exactly as he says. Then he reminds them he loves them. This is not a good look, Methuselah. I am amazed that people are proud of this god. Unless it is Moses who has gone insane, and has decided to order the people to follow God at all costs. Perhaps it is his tone, and his logic that leads to this dreadful picture.

MS: Which part of the Ten Commandments do you have problems with? What exactly offends you? Please, share your objections with me.

SAS: I have no objections to the content. I object to the way that Moses, expressing God’s wishes, threatens the people with punishments and annihilation, if they don’t show adequate fear and gratitude. Obedience at all costs. And liking it! It’s the threats. Methuselah. I’ll give you all these wonderful things, a good life, milk and honey. But if, for one moment, you get complacent, and think you have achieved all this because you have worked hard and deserve it, I’ll destroy you. I, God, provide this all for you because I hate the other nations.

LONG VERSION

  Parshat Eikev  

a.k.a Moses sets out the terms (Deuteronomy 7:12 - 11:25) 

 

Then Moses continued his speech to the Israelites, reminding them of their history and the covenant they had made with God.  “If you hear these Ten Commandments and obey them carefully, God will keep this covenant. God will love you and bless you and multiply you. God will bless your children, your soil, grain, wine, oil and animals. You will be blessed more than all the peoples.

“But,” Moses reminded the people “you will have to annihilate many nations; you will not be able to feel any mercy and you will wipe them out so that you will not worship their gods. Worshipping other gods is a danger you will have to be aware of. Do not fear other people or their gods, for your God is a great and awesome God. God will bring the other peoples to your feet and you shall destroy them. And burn the images of their gods.  And do not desire or keep any part of these images, the silver or the gold, because they are an abomination to God.

“Remember the whole journey which God has led you on for forty years in the wilderness. God allowed you to feel hunger, then sent you manna to teach you that it is not by bread alone that man lives, but that everything comes from God. Therefore remember deep in your hearts that God rears you and teaches you as a father rears his son.

“And you should keep the commandments to walk in God’s ways and to fear God. For God will bring you into a good land where you will need for nothing. When you have eaten and are satisfied, then you should bless God and thank him for the good land that he has given you.

“Remember not to forget God by ignoring the commandments once you have all you need. Be aware that you may become haughty and you might forget God, who delivered you from Egypt, where you were slaves. Then you might not remember how God gave you manna from heaven and water from a rock. Perhaps you will say, ‘It was by dint of my own power that I have achieved all these comforts.’ Just remember that it is God who gives you the power to live easily so that you can uphold the covenant.

“However”, said Moses, “if it should happen that you forget God and go after other gods, and serve them and bow down to them, then I warn you today that you will certainly perish. Like the nations that God will cause to perish, so will you perish.

“In the promised land, there will be nations that are larger and stronger than you. Do not believe that when your God routs them that it is because of you and your devotion to duty that God has given you this land. No, it is because of the wickedness of these nations that God has driven them away. God has driven them away to fulfil the covenant that God made with your forefathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

“Remember, you have been a stiff-necked people. Remember how you provoked God and rebelled against God and God wanted to destroy you. Remember when God gave me the two stone tablets for you, as a sign of his covenant, and then I discovered that you had built a golden calf to be your god instead. Remember that I broke those tablets and melted your god and reduced the gold to powder that I scattered in the river. I wept and fasted for forty days to ask God to forgive you. I suffered on your behalf.

“After all my suffering and beseeching, God made me return to the mountain and make new tablets with The Ten Commandments and place them into the ark, to be taken care of by the Levis. Remember how we made the ark with meticulous care and carried it with us throughout our time in the wilderness.

“And after all this, what does God require of you? Only this:  to fear God, to walk in all God’s ways and to love God and to serve God with all your heart and with all your soul and all your might. Keep these commandments because they are good for you. Remember this! It is to God that the heavens and the earth belong.

“So I am telling you and warning you -- do not stiffen your necks anymore. For God is god of gods and Lord of lords. God is the great, mighty and feared God who does not care for reputation and cannot be bribed, Rather, He upholds the rights of the orphan and widow and stranger. You, too, should love the stranger, for remember, you were strangers in the land of Egypt.

“So love God, for you saw all that God did for you in the wilderness and before that when he delivered you from slavery and performed miracles.  I remind you, keep these commandments as you enter the Promised Land - a land of great bounty that can flow with honey. This is land that God will take care of and protect. The eyes of God are always fixed upon it. If you will serve God with all your heart and with all your soul, then God will make rain and your crops will grow and be harvested and you shall eat and be satisfied.

“But I warn you, do not reject God and serve other gods and bow down before them. If you do, the anger of God will be kindled, and God will withhold rain, and the soil will not yield its produce, and you will be wiped off the good land that God has given you.

“Listen rather: You must place these words upon your heart and upon your soul, and bind them as a sign upon your hand, and let them be for frontlets between your eyes, and teach them to your children and speak of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk upon the way, when you lie down and when you get up. Write them on the doorposts of your house and upon your gates, so that the days of your children may be long in the Promised Land. If you keep these commandments, God will ensure that people in all the lands you pass through will be vanquished.

 

 

Commentary on the 46th parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: Well, here we have it, Methuselah. Your God. Contingent love. “Love me, be grateful and do what I say, or else. I love you, but only if you thank me, love me exclusively and do as I say. I will destroy you if you don’t love me exclusively and unconditionally. Yet, my love for you is entirely conditional on your behaviour”.

MS: As always, you miss the point. God continually, through Moses, reaffirms his commitment to the people, promising to protect them and hold them close. He reminds them of what he has done for them and assures them of a good life in the Promised Land.

SAS: But what an attitude! He’s petulant and a bully. He sounds like a strict and terrible father who will strike his children if they don’t obey him, and that includes groveling and thanking him for bringing them into the world, feeding and clothing them. He reminds the people how strong he is and how he will smite them if they don’t do exactly as he says. Then he reminds them he loves them. This is not a good look, Methuselah. I am amazed that people are proud of this god. Unless it is Moses who has gone insane, and has decided to order the people to follow God at all costs. Perhaps it is his tone, and his logic that leads to this dreadful picture.

MS: Which part of the Ten Commandments do you have problems with? What exactly offends you? Please, share your objections with me.

SAS: I have no objections to the content. I object to the way that Moses, expressing God’s wishes, threatens the people with punishments and annihilation, if they don’t show adequate fear and gratitude. Obedience at all costs. And liking it! It’s the threats. Methuselah. I’ll give you all these wonderful things, a good life, milk and honey. But if, for one moment, you get complacent, and think you have achieved all this because you have worked hard and deserve it, I’ll destroy you. I, God, provide this all for you because I hate the other nations.

MS: Sigmund. Listen to yourself. You’re raving. All Moses is saying is that the people must understand that it is God who is powerful and awesome, and that they should look beyond themselves to account for their achievements. It is God who gives and takes. And they should remember and be thankful that God has chosen them, and that God made a covenant with their ancestors.

SAS: But he is also saying that God loves them like a strict patriarch. He would annihilate them if they challenged him or forgot who’s boss. I don’t call this love. I call it a protection racket. And Moses is the chief enforcer.

MS: You really believe that humans are responsible for what they have achieved? You don’t acknowledge the miracles of everyday life? You don’t think we should thank God for every breath we take, and our water and food? You are seriously arrogant. Who do you think you are, and what do you think you are without God?

SAS: I think I am a human being who works hard, suffers, does what he can in an indifferent universe, but at least takes responsibility for himself.

MS: I feel sorry for you. You must feel very lonely and very helpless. I feel grateful, fortunate, and utterly protected from the vicissitudes of the world.

SAS: Well, you are lucky, but deluded. And incidentally, what is this new story of being good to the stranger? I thought we should annihilate all the strangers who were not like us. Weren’t we going to kill them and burn their gods?

MS:  We are to welcome strangers and offer them food, shelter and protection. It is not this sort of stranger that God will annihilate. It is those who want us to embrace their gods and their ways that must be destroyed.

SAS: It all sounds very arbitrary to me. Different kinds of strangers. Different moralities. No consistent guidance, simply caprices and tantrums.

MS: Well, this is what I regard as guidance. The Sh’ma. What are your objections to the Sh’ma, and reminding yourself of God’s words several times a day?

SAS: I have no serious objections, because I don’t think it’s harmful, just superstitious. It seems to me that when we say the Sh’ma, we must just repeat that we will remember God’s words and say them. There’s nothing about understanding God’s words, simply a spoken reminder to ourselves that God’s words should be at the forefront of our minds.

MS: Once more, you don’t understand the context of these commandments. The people need to be kept together, and have a central focus. Their morality is determined by God’s commandments. They have to follow the commandments so that they are strong and unified as a people.

SAS: I see. And staying together includes a complete prohibition on intermarriage with the current inhabitants of the land.  What’s that about, Methuselah? Why? Are we to keep ourselves separate because we are so frightened of losing our faith? Why are we so special? Because God speaks to us? You know, this is stuff that could get someone sent off for psychiatric help. Imagine, here is a modern person who says, “I have to burn idols. I am not allowed to marry anyone who is not part of my group. There is a land in which other people live but I am going to actively rout them and take over their land, because I heard voices. God told me to. God promised me.”

MS: You misunderstand the context. You misunderstand God’s love for his people. You misunderstand the Covenant God has made with us. You misunderstand how important it is that he has agreed to protect us. Essentially, you misunderstand everything.  It is a tremendous responsibility to bear the mantle of being the chosen people.

SAS: Do you understand that these beliefs are insane? Bargains with God, whom we can’t see, and of whose existence we have no proof! Instructions to follow as though we were Zombies! Instructions to destroy others in order to maintain the love of our Inner Voice! This is crazy, Methuselah. You are an intelligent man. How can you follow this path?

MS: Because I have faith. Because I love the commandments. Because I feel protected and safe reaffirming my belief in God every time I say the Sh’ma. And I understand that there are people who need to be told that they have to follow these instructions, because if they are not shown the way, they will go astray. And I think that I try every day to be a righteous man.

SAS: Please don’t tell me that you are a righteous man because of the tale of a desert tribe, worn down after wandering in the wilderness for 40 years, led by a madman who threw tantrums, experienced hallucinations, and issued terrifying threats. And then, on top of it, that you identify with the right of this tribe to invade a land settled already by others and kill them, on the basis of hearing voices telling them to do so. 

MS: I prefer to obey the Ten Commandments, say the Sh’ma and show my respect and gratitude to God for what he has done for me and my people. I can’t see the point of your raving. I think you protest too much, Sigmund. I think you are frightened, because you are vulnerable and unprotected. 

   

History 

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

The First Lebanon War (1982)  

Lebanon in the 1960s was seen as a supporter of American imperialism but leftist parties as well as Palestinian guerillas worked hard to destabilize the pro-American forces in the country. This strategy was successful and armed Palestinians became powerful in the region. The Cairo Agreement of 1969 followed the War of Attrition (1968-1969). In terms of this agreement, the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) was granted military and political privileges in South Lebanon.

 

The PLO, indeed, governed this area which became known as “Fatahland” in recognition of the ruling PLO faction of the time, El Fatah. It was a “state within a state”. El Fatah used its base to bomb Northern Israel, especially the town of Kiryat Shmona.

By the mid-70s, civil war had broken out in Lebanon as tensions rose between Christians, Muslims and Palestinian Arabs. In 1978, following a PLO terrorist attack in Israel, the IDF entered Lebanon and overran terrorist bases. A United Nations force came to police the region but PLO members re-entered southern Lebanon and started setting up new bases.

In 1982 Israeli PM, Menachem Begin, fresh from an election victory in 1981, decided to act against the Palestinians in Lebanon. The assault followed the attempted assassination by Palestinian terrorists of the Israeli ambassador in Britain, Shlomo Argov.  The Israeli cabinet authorized a 40km incursion only, but defense minister Ariel Sharon authorized a bigger operation. The upshot was that Israel fought its way right into Beirut and took control of the city. This is the only time that Israel has occupied an Arab capital.

Defeated, PLO cadres took refuge among the civilian population of West Beirut. In August 1982 the PLO, with Yassir Arafat among them, retreated to Tunisia. Israel then helped orchestrate the election victory of Bashir Gemayel, a senior member of the Phalange party. He agreed to recognize Israel and sign a peace treaty, but before he put pen to paper he was assassinated.

This event provided the spur for Phalangist Christian forces to enter two Palestinian refugee camps, Sabra and Shatila, on 16 September and slaughter many of the occupants. When news of these massacres reached Israel there was an outcry against the war and 400,000 people protested in Tel Aviv.

In 1983 an Israeli public inquiry, the Kahan Commission, found that Ariel Sharon was indirectly but personally responsible for the massacres and it was recommended that he never serve as defense minister again. He quit his post to become a minister without portfolio. He later served as Israel’s PM from 2001 to 2006.

In relation to the massacres, Sharon was found to have “disregarded the prospect of acts of vengeance and bloodshed by the Phalangists against the population of the refugee camps and … failed to take this danger into account”. Israeli forces at the time had the refugee camps surrounded and had allowed the Phalangist Christians to enter the camps. Estimates of the number of dead in the massacre differ markedly, with the bottom figure being 328 and the highest figure 3,500.

An accord between Israel and Lebanon in May 1983 provided the basis for an Israeli withdrawal, but the arrangement broke down. Most of the Israeli troops had left Lebanon by January 1985 but that did not signal a complete exodus of forces. By June 1985 the rest of the Israeli soldiers had withdrawn to a “security zone” inside the Lebanese border. This area extended eight miles into south Lebanon and was manned by 1000 troops. Israel withdrew all its troops from south Lebanon on 24 May 2000, ending a 22-year military presence there.  

The 2008 animated film “Waltz with Bashir”, written and directed by Ari Folman, deals with the First Lebanon War and the infamous massacres at Sabra and Shatila.   

 

 Here follows a discussion on this historical segment by Dad, Chaya and Ben. 

 

CHAYA: I have seen the film “Waltz with Bashir” and I must say that it opened my eyes to what happened in those horrific massacres. It will forever be a source of shame to those who effectively aided and abetted the horrific acts of violence committed in Sabra and Shatila.

DAD: It is deeply upsetting that Israeli forces did not prevent that from happening.

BEN: At least Israel held an official inquiry, condemned the atrocities and apportioned blame to Ariel Sharon.

CHAYA: In effect, this was merely a slap on the wrist. They told him he could never be defense minister again, so what did he do? He became Prime Minister instead!

DAD: Certainly that’s ironic, but I’m not sure you can easily blame someone for not predicting that something would happen and not taking measures to prevent it. Sharon wasn’t being employed for his powers of prophecy.

CHAYA: I think you’re being too easy on him. It was common sense to assume that reprisals would occur once Bashir had been assassinated, and that the Christian Phalangists would strike out against those least able to defend themselves.

BEN: In other words, always assume the worst of human nature and you’ll have a good idea of what will happen in the immediate future!

DAD: What I’m trying to say is that the blame lay most properly with the military commanders on the ground. They must have seen the Phalangists enter the camps and heard the gunfire and the screams. They should have acted immediately to stop the massacre!

BEN: How? By running in and shooting too? Once a situation goes badly wrong, you can’t easily restore order from chaos. We need to do more research before we express our opinions too forcefully.

CHAYA: Or we can rely on the findings of the Kahan Commission! It was their job to examine the circumstances of these massacres and apportion blame. We should accept their findings until we have achieved a comparable level of expertise on this matter.

BEN: I’d like to leave that argument and focus on the benefits of the invasion for Israel. Surely achievement of the primary objective of driving out the Palestinians meant that Israel succeeded in its mission.

DAD: Well, you might want to ask why the Israeli state thought that it was entitled to wipe out this “state within a state”. Certainly the Palestinian “state within a state” was sent packing. The retreat to Tunisia was humiliating and the PLO wasn’t welcomed with open arms there either. But the Palestinians kept coming back to Lebanon and civil war became the norm. One of the more interesting upshots was the War of the Camps in the mid-80s in which Palestinian refugee camps were attacked by Shiite militia. 

CHAYA: So Muslims turned against Muslims? 

DAD: Yes, they did. In fact, the Shiites had already defeated the main Sunni militia that had supported the Palestinians. In spite of serious setbacks, the PLO did manage to retain control of some camps. 

CHAYA: I feel sorry for the local citizens who suffered during this violence. It’s ordinary, decent folk who often take the brunt of attacks and pay in blood when political leaders can’t find solutions that don’t involve violence. 

DAD: We’d all agree, I think, that this state of affairs is part of the ongoing tragedy of human relations. 

BEN: Still, carnage and atrocities aside, we can chalk a victory up to Israel here, I think. The PLO clearly took a hammering and Israel was much safer than before.

CHAYA: After those massacres and Israel’s “Waltz with Bashir”? I’m sorry, but I’m finding it hard to see “positives” when those truly appalling slaughters remain so clearly in my imagination.

 

Sayings 

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·        He is the kind of man who first prepares the bandage, then inflicts the wound. (Talmud)

·        Fish die out of water, and people die without law and order. (Talmud)

·        Many complain of their looks, but no one complains of their brains.

·        People are not honest simply because they never had a chance to steal.

·        A person is not old until their regrets take the place of their dreams.

 

Celebration of Great Lives 

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Simon Wiesenthal (1908-2005) 

Simon Wiesenthal is best known for his relentless pursuit of former Nazis after World War II. This Austrian architectural engineer was a survivor of several concentration camps during the war and after his release he made it his life’s work to track down Nazi fugitives so they could face trial for war crimes and crimes against humanity. “Justice, not vengeance” was his motto. In 1947 he co-founded the Jewish Historical Documentation Center in Linz, Austria, and in 1962 he reopened the Jewish Documentation Center in Vienna. Wiesenthal achieved a number of notable successes which included the capture of Franz Stangl, commandant of Treblinka, and Karl Silberbauer, the Gestapo officer whose men arrested Anne Frank. Wiesenthal also exposed the Nazi pasts of several Austrians seeking public office. He received many death threats and a bomb once exploded outside his home in Vienna. However, in October 2006 a street in Vienna was renamed in his honor. The Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles is named after him.  Wiesenthal’s own life remains an enigma since his three memoirs show inconsistencies and they don’t square with public records. His research was detailed and meticulous, yet his accounts of his own life were embellished and unreliable. 

 

Isaac Babel (1894-1940) 

This Russian journalist, playwright and short story writer has been described as the “greatest prose writer of Russian Jewry”. He grew up in Odessa, and lived through the 1905 pogrom there. Denied a place at school because of the Jewish quota, he was home-schooled by tutors and emerged as a young man fluent in Hebrew, Yiddish and French, in which language he wrote his first stories. After graduating from the Kiev Institute of Finance and Business, he moved to Petrograd and befriended Maxim Gorky who published some of his stories in his literary magazine. He supported Lenin’s Bolsheviks in the Russian Civil War and served with the cavalry during the Polish-Soviet War (1920). He drew on these experiences in his collection of short stories, “Red Cavalry” (1926). Later he wrote “Odessa Tales”, which explored the lives of Jewish gangsters in the ghetto of Moldavanka. His play “Sunset”, based on these stories, opened in 1927. Babel was feted in Moscow, but in the 1930s he was accused of deviationist thought and low output. His 1935 play “Maria” was canceled by the NKVD (People’s Commissariat for Internal Affairs). Occasionally allowed to visit his wife and daughter in Paris, Babel did not take advantage of the chance to escape Stalinist Russia. In May 1939 he was arrested and his literary output expunged from official records. He was tried and executed in January 1940 after being falsely accused of treason and spying. He left behind a common-law wife and daughter in Russia as well as his wife and daughter in Paris.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOW TO SING THE SONGS
ADON OLAM WORDS
Adon Olam David Solid Gould & The Temple Rockers
ALL MEN ARE BROTHERS
ALLE BRUDER SONG
ALLE BRIDER SONG
AL KOL ELEH WORDS
AL KOL ELEH
BASHANA words
BASHANA SONG
BEI MIR BIST DU SHEYN
BEI MIR BIST DU SCHEYN SONG
BMBDS song
CHIRIBIM WORDS
CHIRIBIM Song
DAYENU WORDS
DAYENU SONG ENGLISH
DAYENU SONG
DONNA DONNA
DONNA DONNA SONG
HALLELUYA
HALELUJA KARAOKE
HATIKVA
HATIKVA SONG
HATIKVA SONG
DAYENU
HATIKVA WORDS
HATIKVA SONG 1
HAVA NAGILA WORDS
HAVA NAGILA SONG
HAVA NAGILA KARAOKE
HAVEINU SHALOM ALEICHEM
HEVENU SHALOM ALEICHEM WORDS
HEVENU SHALOM ALECHEM SONG
HINEH MA TOV WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD KARAOKE IVRIT
JERUSALEM THE GOLD SONG
JERUSALEM THE GOLD JARAOKE
MAYIM MAYIM WORDS
MAYIM MAYIM DANCE
OIF'N PRIPITSCHOK song
OSE SHALOM
OSE SHALOM SONG
PAPI ROS'N
PAPIROS'N SONG
PARTISAN SONG 1
PARTISAN SONG
PARTISAN SONG MUSIC
RABBI ELIMELEKH
RABBI ELIMELEKH SONG
AS DER REBE SINGT
AS DER REBBE SINGT LEONARD COHEN
AS DER REBBE SINGT SONG
RAISINS WITH ALMONDS WORDS
SIMANTOV U MAZELTOV WORDS
SIMAN TOV MUSIC
MAZELTOV CLARINET
TUMBALALAIKA WORDS
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA 4
TZENA TZENA The Weavers
TZENA TZENA WORDS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
HATIKVA STREISAND
HATIKVA STREISAND
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
YO EN ESTANDO - SEPHARDIC
ELIYAHU SEPHARDIC
SEPHARDIC SONG
SEPHARDIC SONG 3
Sholem Aleichem Susan Allen
Shalom Aleichem Susan Allen
OTHER VERSIONS OF SONGS
DUVID CROCKET WORDS
DUVID CROCKET MICKEY KATZ
MODERN PASSOVER SONGS
This will help you find yourself]