THE GOOD SHABBOS COMMUNITY

ENJOYING YOUR JEWISH HERITAGE THROUGH FOOD, FACTS AND FUN - SHABBAT SHALOM

 

 CHALLAH, WINE,  CANDLES , READ A LITTLE, TALK A LITTLE AND SING

TO ACT OR NOT TO ACT BLOG HOME WHY ABOUT US WHO FOR CONTACT WHERE LINKS FOOD FOR SHABBOS SHARING WHAT WE DO EACH SHABBOS SHABBOS LIGHT WEEKLY CONTENT SONGS - THE MUSIC
 

August 13

 

Short version

 

Challah dips wine drinks candles

 

SINGING

 Moses and Monotheism

“So now,” said Moses, “listen carefully to all God’s laws and obey them so that you will flourish in your new home. Further, remember, your actions will serve as an example to other nations. 

“Don’t forget the things you have seen. Tell them to the children. Teach them how you heard the voice of God at Horeb and how he gave you the Ten Commandments. 

“Do not forget that God never appeared to you in any form, and you must never make an idol in an attempt to depict him. 

“Never worship any heavenly bodies either. They are merely part of nature. 

“I can’t cross over into the Promised Land with you. It is my final task to tell you to remember God’s covenant with you. 

“You will perish in that place if you break God’s commandments and bow down to idols. 

“However, if you seek God in that land he will always be at hand. He is merciful and will never abandon you. 

“Has anything in history ever compared to what God has done for you – how He rescued you from Egypt and spoke to you from out of the fire? 

“You were shown all these things so that you would know God and appreciate the inheritance he has given you. 

“Take this history to heart, obey God’s commands, and you and your children will live long in the land that He has given you.” 

Then Moses repeated the Ten Commandments for the people, and afterwards he said, “Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one.” He advised that God’s words should be imprinted on the hearts of his people.  

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

 

SINGING

 

SAS: This is a portion of great significance, what with that apparently monotheistic expression, “Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one.” It’s a rightly famous pronouncement as it separates our people’s faith from that of the polytheists and henotheists around them.

MS: I know that you don’t believe in God, but I would like to think that you at least recognize the superior nature of monotheism over belief in several gods.

SAS: Funnily enough, I don’t. Very few of us humans respect someone who is utterly self-sufficient and never seeks out the company of other people. We rightly think of such a person as a sad and maladjusted recluse. That happens even when the recluse is a supposedly holy person. We are social creatures after all. Why, then, should God be revered when he is utterly without peers or companions on his own level? What a sad and lonely deity he must be! Not even an upwardly mobile archangel or seraph would provide much companionship or intellectual stimulation for such a supreme being!

MS: The nonsense you speak is no doubt meant flippantly, but there is nothing amusing in your remarks. Their absurdity is obvious. God is not to be viewed anthropomorphically as a perfect version of a human being – someone who needs friends, company or intellectual stimulation. He is a being of a completely differ order. He is utterly complete in Himself and requires nothing outside himself. It is ludicrous to think of the supreme Lord of the Universe needing companionship, or being lonely! In fact, it is blasphemous!

SAS: I think it is utterly ludicrous to think of a supreme being at all. But if we’re going to go so far, we might as well let him have friends and be gregarious. But OK, I know all the ideas about how wonderful monotheism is, and I can see that it’s a big improvement on the Olympian pantheon of gods who were always arguing and stabbing each other in the back.

MS: It is also an improvement on the idea that there were competing gods in the Ancient Near East, with some people’s gods more powerful than others. What we Jews gave the world was the insight that God had no rivals and that the very concept of God excluded the possibility of other gods. There can only be only one Supreme Being.

SAS: What about pantheism and the idea that everything is, in some sense, divine? Or is that idea too sophisticated for you?

MS: Sophisticated? It is nonsensical! One thing Judaism has taught the world is that God is outside of nature. He is its creator and its sustainer, not its indweller! Our God transcends the world. That is why we don’t make images of him!

 

SINGING

 

History

 

 

The Camp David Accords

 

Jimmy Carter became US President in January 1977 and worked towards reinvigorating the Middle East peace process. Carter visited a number of heads of state in the region and proposed terms of reference relating to the 1973 Geneva Conference, held after the Yom Kippur War. This Conference had not determined a modus operandi for the region, but it had led to an agreement that disputes in the region would be resolved through peaceful, not military means. The key to success, for Carter, lay in brokering an accord between the Egyptians and Israelis. Various Arab groupings warned Egypt not to broker such an accord.

 

In May 1977 the political terrain changed in Israel when the right-wing Likkud Party won the election under Menachem Begin. Begin was amenable to talks with the Egyptians, although he opposed surrendering territory on the West Bank. Begin’s willingness to enter dialogue with Egypt was partly due to the advantages of negotiating with a single nation, rather than with a broader Arab delegation. He also saw the advantage of driving a wedge between Egypt and other Arab nations.

 

In November 1977 Egypt’s president Anwar Sadat surprised his Arab allies by becoming the first Arab leader to visit Israel, where he addressed the Knesset. Begin made a reciprocal visit to Ismailia. Libya, Iraq and Syria condemned Sadat’s initiative and several Communist Bloc countries threatened action against Egypt if it courted Western influence and enlisted the help of NATO countries for its shaky economy.

 

 

In the end, two agreements were reached - A Framework for Peace in the Middle East and A Framework for the Conclusion of a Peace Treaty between Egypt and Israel. The latter led to the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty of March 1979. The first agreement laid the basis for an autonomous, self-governing authority in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Once such an authority had been freely elected by inhabitants, Israel’s military government and civil administration would be withdrawn. In terms of the second agreement, Israel would withdraw its forces from the Sinai Peninsula and restore it to Egypt in return for peaceful co-existence. 

 

Israel returned Egypt’s Abu-Rudeis oil fields in western Sinai, but gained ongoing access to the Suez Canal. Each country recognized the other, and the effective state of war that had existed since 1948 ended. The USA sweetened the deal with promises of annual subsidies to both countries. These grants are still in place.

The Camp David Accords led to Egypt’s suspension from the Arab League for 10 years (1979-1989). A serious dent had been put in the concept of pan-Arabism, a doctrine much beloved by Sadat’s predecessor, Gamal Nasser.

 

Sadat was assassinated on 6 October 1981 by Islamic radicals at a military parade.

 

 

For signing the accords, Begin and Sadat shared the 1978 Nobel Peace Prize.

Sayings

 

 

SINGING

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·         Interest on debt grows without rain.

·         Show her the rudder, but don’t steer her boat.

·         Talk too much and you talk about yourself.

·         If you don’t want to do something, one excuse is as good as another.

·         We are all meshuga in one way or another.

 

 

 

SINGING

Celebration of Great Lives

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Jacob Bronowski (1908-1974)

Jacob Bronowski was born in Poland. His parents moved to Germany and then to England in 1920. He studied Mathematics at the University of Cambridge and edited the literary journal Experiment with William Empson. After receiving a Ph.D. in Maths in 1935 he went on to teach at the University College of Hull. In 1950 he developed a strong interest in Biology after being given the Taung child’s fossilized skull to examine. This interest developed into a high level of expertise, as was evident when Bronowski presented the 1973 BBC TV series, The Ascent of Man. Interviewed by Michael Parkinson around that time, Bronowski spoke movingly of a visit to Auschwitz, the type of camp in which several of his relatives had died.  

 

 

SINGING

Vidal Sassoon (1928 - )

Sassoon was born to Jewish parents in London. In his early years he was a member of the British anti-fascist organisation called the “43 Group”. In 1948 he joined the Israeli Defense Forces to fight in the Arab-Israeli War. In the 1960s he made a name for himself as a hairstylist. Styles he created included the “geometric”, the wash-and-wear “perm” and the “Nancy Kwan”. He also popularized the “bob cut”. Sassoon saw hairstyling as an exercise in geometric design and his work became an inspiration for many during and after the Swinging Sixties. After moving to the USA in the early 1980s, Sassoon gave his name to hair-care products and the multinational company Procter and Gamble made Vidal Sassoon shampoos and conditioners world famous. A chain of Sassoon salons was also established. In 1982, Sassoon started the Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Anti-Semitism. He was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2009. 

 

 

SINGING

LONG VERSION 

Parshat Va’etchanan  

 

a.k.a Moses and Monotheism (Deuteronomy 3:23 – 7:11) 

 

Moses continued with his exposition of recent history, telling the people that his role as their leader would be coming to an end and that he would soon die. 

“I pleaded with God to let me enter the Promised Land,” said Moses, “but because of your disobedience he would not listen to me and told me the subject was closed. Instead, he told me to ascend to a high place and survey all the land which I would never enter. 

“Then God told me to commission Joshua to cross the river Jordan with the people and lead them into the Promised Land.” 

“So now,” said Moses, “listen carefully to all God’s laws and obey them so that you will flourish in your new home. Further, remember, your actions will serve as an example to other nations. 

“Don’t forget the things you have seen. Tell them to the children. Teach them how you heard the voice of God at Horeb and how he gave you the Ten Commandments. 

“Do not forget that God never appeared to you in any form, and you must never make an idol in an attempt to depict him. 

“Never worship any heavenly bodies either. They are merely part of nature. 

“I can’t cross over into the Promised Land with you. It is my final task to tell you to remember God’s covenant with you. 

“You will perish in that place if you break God’s commandments and bow down to idols. 

“However, if you seek God in that land he will always be at hand. He is merciful and will never abandon you. 

“Has anything in history ever compared to what God has done for you – how He rescued you from Egypt and spoke to you from out of the fire? 

“You were shown all these things so that you would know God and appreciate the inheritance he has given you. 

“Take this history to heart, obey God’s commands, and you and your children will live long in the land that He has given you.” 

Then Moses repeated the Ten Commandments for the people, and afterwards he said, “Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one.” He advised that God’s words should be imprinted on the hearts of his people.  

Moses added that the people should always be grateful for living in a land where they had taken possession of houses, wells, vineyards and olive groves that they themselves didn’t build or establish. Further, they should never doubt God or put him to any test. 

The people should never forget the deliverance from Egypt and should make it a cornerstone of their faith. Neither should they ever forget God’s commandments. 

Moses identified the seven nations that God would help his people defeat in battle – the Hittites, Girgashites, Amorites, Canaanites, Perizzites, Hivites and Jebusites. All these nations were more powerful than the people of Israel, yet with God’s help, would be defeated by them. 

The people of Israel were to destroy the altars and idols of these people, as well as the people themselves. There would be no basis for coexistence or intermarriage. 

Moses ordered that God’s people were to remain loyal to God. Any who turned against God would be destroyed. They should exercise utter care, therefore, in following God’s commandments.  

 

 Commentary on the 43rd parsha (portion) of the Torah. The Torah consists of the five books of Moses, the first part of the Old Testament. 

 

To get to grips with this parsha, our Supermaven, Sigmund Albert Spinoza, interviews Methuselah Solomon (an Ancient Elder). Supermaven is a modern philosopher who is trying to understand Judaism and how we got where we are.

 

He will do this every week by investigating the Old Testament.

 

SAS: This is a portion of great significance, what with that apparently monotheistic expression, “Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one.” It’s a rightly famous pronouncement as it separates our people’s faith from that of the polytheists and henotheists around them.

MS: I know that you don’t believe in God, but I would like to think that you at least recognize the superior nature of monotheism over belief in several gods.

SAS: Funnily enough, I don’t. Very few of us humans respect someone who is utterly self-sufficient and never seeks out the company of other people. We rightly think of such a person as a sad and maladjusted recluse. That happens even when the recluse is a supposedly holy person. We are social creatures after all. Why, then, should God be revered when he is utterly without peers or companions on his own level? What a sad and lonely deity he must be! Not even an upwardly mobile archangel or seraph would provide much companionship or intellectual stimulation for such a supreme being!

MS: The nonsense you speak is no doubt meant flippantly, but there is nothing amusing in your remarks. Their absurdity is obvious. God is not to be viewed anthropomorphically as a perfect version of a human being – someone who needs friends, company or intellectual stimulation. He is a being of a completely differ order. He is utterly complete in Himself and requires nothing outside himself. It is ludicrous to think of the supreme Lord of the Universe needing companionship, or being lonely! In fact, it is blasphemous!

SAS: I think it is utterly ludicrous to think of a supreme being at all. But if we’re going to go so far, we might as well let him have friends and be gregarious. But OK, I know all the ideas about how wonderful monotheism is, and I can see that it’s a big improvement on the Olympian pantheon of gods who were always arguing and stabbing each other in the back.

MS: It is also an improvement on the idea that there were competing gods in the Ancient Near East, with some people’s gods more powerful than others. What we Jews gave the world was the insight that God had no rivals and that the very concept of God excluded the possibility of other gods. There can only be only one Supreme Being.

SAS: What about pantheism and the idea that everything is, in some sense, divine? Or is that idea too sophisticated for you?

MS: Sophisticated? It is nonsensical! One thing Judaism has taught the world is that God is outside of nature. He is its creator and its sustainer, not its indweller! Our God transcends the world. That is why we don’t make images of him!

SAS: Yet he speaks from burning bushes and descends to Horeb from where he hands out rules for this world.

MS: But He is not identified with these parts of nature, Sigmund.  

SAS: I see. But this emphasis on transcendence makes God quite fearsome and judgmental, doesn’t it? His presence has weighed heavily on the human consciousness ever since we started worshipping him. He’s all too human, when it comes to frailty. He has been something of a moral tyrant whom it has been difficult to love and appease. His otherness makes him very stern.

MS: And stern He should sometimes be! He’s the boss, my friend.

SAS: Yes, that is pretty much how I’ve always viewed him: Superhuman, with all the best and worst of us in him. He is not my favorite character in literature, I can tell you.

MS: He is not merely a character in literature. He is a living being who speaks to us in Torah as surely as you speak to your own children. Go back to the parsha for guidance, Sigmund.  He is the one whose voice was heard at Horeb. He is the one who gave us the Ten Commandments. He is the one who led us into the Promised Land. He is the one who speaks to us through our history. Listen again to these great words – “Take this history to heart, obey God’s commands, and you and your children will live long in the land that He has given you.” 

SAS: Powerful rhetoric to be sure, my friend, but just rhetoric. And couched in such human terms! You have shown us mythology, not history, and whatever fortune we once enjoyed in our real history has been counterbalanced by terrible misfortunes. More, indeed, than any people should have to bear!

MS: The burden of chosenness can be great, my friend!

SAS: Chosenness? We ourselves decided we were chosen. It is at best a pious illusion and at worst a form of conceitedness. Either way, the concept hasn’t served us well.

MS: It has given us our identity and our sense of destiny!

SAS: Has this, however, sometimes been at the expense of our humanity? What of God’s order, through Moses, that we were to wipe out these seven nations and not coexist with others in the Promised Land or intermarry with them?

MS: Do you take issue with this? Once again, this is how we preserved our identity as a people and preserved our biological and cultural inheritance. We were instructed to be God’s people, not a vehicle for the hybridization of the human race.

SAS: Is chosenness, therefore, as much a matter of unsullied genetics as it is a matter of setting an ethical example to other peoples?

MS: Yes, of course! How can a people continue to exist if they don’t protect their gene pool?

SAS: Well, it’s an interesting question, actually. Too limited a gene pool could be a seriously problem for a population. Have you heard of inbreeding and the unhardiness that follows?

MS: That is why we have the laws of marriage forbidding incest. There is nothing wrong with Jewish genes.

SAS: That’s because there have been plenty willing or unwilling liaisons with people of other genetic heritages. You know that, Methuselah, so don’t be so selective in your arguments.

MS: We have to keep ourselves pure and protected from other influences, otherwise our faith and our culture will get bleached.

SAS: This injunction not to “marry out” has caused a lot of pain and heartache for many of our people. Anyway, is it not true that Moses married a woman who was not of the chosen people? And what of Ruth, one of Judaism’s great heroines? Solomon ranged far and wide in his choice of wives. The precedents are in your own sacred texts.

MS: It is no less of a requirement for that!

SAS: By your rules you alienate a lot of your fellow Jews, Methuselah, and weaken the base of support.

 

History

 

If you’d like to know more about the real history of our extended Jewish family, read on.

 

The Camp David Accords

 

Jimmy Carter became US President in January 1977 and worked towards reinvigorating the Middle East peace process. Carter visited a number of heads of state in the region and proposed terms of reference relating to the 1973 Geneva Conference, held after the Yom Kippur War. This Conference had not determined a modus operandi for the region, but it had led to an agreement that disputes in the region would be resolved through peaceful, not military means. The key to success, for Carter, lay in brokering an accord between the Egyptians and Israelis. Various Arab groupings warned Egypt not to broker such an accord.

 

In May 1977 the political terrain changed in Israel when the right-wing Likkud Party won the election under Menachem Begin. Begin was amenable to talks with the Egyptians, although he opposed surrendering territory on the West Bank. Begin’s willingness to enter dialogue with Egypt was partly due to the advantages of negotiating with a single nation, rather than with a broader Arab delegation. He also saw the advantage of driving a wedge between Egypt and other Arab nations.

 

In November 1977 Egypt’s president Anwar Sadat surprised his Arab allies by becoming the first Arab leader to visit Israel, where he addressed the Knesset. Begin made a reciprocal visit to Ismailia. Libya, Iraq and Syria condemned Sadat’s initiative and several Communist Bloc countries threatened action against Egypt if it courted Western influence and enlisted the help of NATO countries for its shaky economy.

 

Sadat pressed ahead, however, and he and Begin arrived at Camp David, a mountain-based military camp in Frederick County, Maryland, in September 1978. Thirteen days of negotiations were held from 5 September to 17 September. The talks did not go well at first since Begin and Sadat disliked each other intensely. President Carter, however, kept pressure on both sides and worked particularly hard to hammer out an accord of sorts. 

 

In the end, two agreements were reached - A Framework for Peace in the Middle East and A Framework for the Conclusion of a Peace Treaty between Egypt and Israel. The latter led to the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty of March 1979. The first agreement laid the basis for an autonomous, self-governing authority in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Once such an authority had been freely elected by inhabitants, Israel’s military government and civil administration would be withdrawn. In terms of the second agreement, Israel would withdraw its forces from the Sinai Peninsula and restore it to Egypt in return for peaceful co-existence. 

 

Israel returned Egypt’s Abu-Rudeis oil fields in western Sinai, but gained ongoing access to the Suez Canal. Each country recognized the other, and the effective state of war that had existed since 1948 ended. The USA sweetened the deal with promises of annual subsidies to both countries. These grants are still in place.

The Camp David Accords led to Egypt’s suspension from the Arab League for 10 years (1979-1989). A serious dent had been put in the concept of pan-Arabism, a doctrine much beloved by Sadat’s predecessor, Gamal Nasser.

 

Sadat was assassinated on 6 October 1981 by Islamic radicals at a military parade.

 

Israel’s main gain was border security and a lessening of tensions along its south-western perimeter. The Accords did not lead to closeness of relations between the countries and relatively few Egyptians have chosen to holiday in Israel. Israelis have been a lot keener to visit Egypt’s ancient and modern attractions. Anti-Semitism continues in Egypt, although commentators differ as to its extent and significance. More telling is a 2006 government poll which shows that 92% of Egyptians view Israel as an enemy nation.

 

For signing the accords, Begin and Sadat shared the 1978 Nobel Peace Prize.

 

Here follows a discussion on this historical segment by Dad, Chaya and Ben.

 

CHAYA: Life is full of ironies. Begin and Sadat disliked each other, yet their names will be united forever on the list of Nobel laureates.

DAD: It is ironic. Each deserved his award, though. Each took a risk in dealing with the other, and Sadat ultimately paid with his life.

BEN: It’s fine to make a fuss about these Accords, but they haven’t made a great deal of difference in the region.

DAD: They made some difference, Ben, and that’s significant in a region where even small victories can be counted as large ones. Israel at least knew that a Yom Kippur War scenario would not erupt any time soon.

CHAYA: True and it also knew that the Arab world was not a monolithic entity and that arrangements might be made with separate nations at separate times.

BEN: I doubt you’re right about that. Granted, Egypt was sidelined by the Arab League for a time, but it is back in the fold now and 92% of Egyptian citizens see Israel as an enemy. That shows that many of the old tensions and hatreds are festering in Cairo.

DAD: Perhaps, Ben, but there’s a big difference between harboring antipathies and going to war over them. The peace between Israel and Egypt has held. And don’t forget that Egypt’s recognition of Israel was an historical breakthrough since no other Arab nation had done that.

CHAYA: Also, Camp David laid the basis for other peace treaties like the Oslo Accords of 1993 as well as the Camp David Summit of 2000.

BEN: Neither of which achieved a great deal. The Middle East remains a political minefield and conflicts are still commonplace, like when Hezbollah guerillas fired Katyusha rockets into Israel from Lebanon. 

DAD: Ben, you can’t blame the Camp David Summits, old and more recent, for not bringing us Middle Eastern Peace in Our Time! Negotiations for this region are extremely delicate and whenever any accord is reached, it’s a breakthrough. We should be grateful for small diplomatic victories and for the brave people who negotiate them.

CHAYA: Ben’s right on one score – Camp David achieved very little when it came to the West Bank. A basis was established for Palestinian self-government in the West Bank but today the region is divided into three Areas, with Area A under control of the Palestinian Authority, Area B jointly administered, and Area C under Israeli control. That’s not a situation that can continue indefinitely.

BEN: Exactly! Camp David resolved the situation in the Sinai, but the status quo in the West Bank is a piece of political patchwork! Why is Israel still occupying the West Bank at all?

DAD: You have to remember that the Camp David stipulations regarding the West Bank were a lot less clear than those regarding the Sinai, and have been the subject of ongoing debate and negotiation ever since.

BEN: That’s why I have no faith in treaties like the Camp David Accords. Not even the participants were sure about what they said!

DAD: Your frustration and disillusionment is understandable, Ben. Like all human endeavors, our treaty-making is flawed and is heavily dependent on language formulations and niceties of interpretation.

CHAYA: At least the term “Camp David” is a metaphor for peaceful intentions. Isn’t that something?

DAD: Yes, it is!

BEN: I’m not convinced.

 

Sayings

 

Every Shabbat we read five short sayings that express, with typically Jewish wit and humor, insightful reflections on this life of ours.

 

Here are tonight’s sayings:

 

·         Interest on debt grows without rain.

·         Show her the rudder, but don’t steer her boat.

·         Talk too much and you talk about yourself.

·         If you don’t want to do something, one excuse is as good as another.

·         We are all meshuga in one way or another.

 

 

Celebration of Great Lives

 

Every Friday night we celebrate the achievements of our Jewish family in contributing to changing the world for the better and having an extraordinary impact on those around them.

 

Jacob Bronowski (1908-1974)

Jacob Bronowski was born in Poland. His parents moved to Germany and then to England in 1920. He studied Mathematics at the University of Cambridge and edited the literary journal Experiment with William Empson. After receiving a Ph.D. in Maths in 1935 he went on to teach at the University College of Hull. In 1950 he developed a strong interest in Biology after being given the Taung child’s fossilized skull to examine. This interest developed into a high level of expertise, as was evident when Bronowski presented the 1973 BBC TV series, The Ascent of Man. Interviewed by Michael Parkinson around that time, Bronowski spoke movingly of a visit to Auschwitz, the type of camp in which several of his relatives had died.  

 

Vidal Sassoon (1928 - )

Sassoon was born to Jewish parents in London. In his early years he was a member of the British anti-fascist organisation called the “43 Group”. In 1948 he joined the Israeli Defense Forces to fight in the Arab-Israeli War. In the 1960s he made a name for himself as a hairstylist. Styles he created included the “geometric”, the wash-and-wear “perm” and the “Nancy Kwan”. He also popularized the “bob cut”. Sassoon saw hairstyling as an exercise in geometric design and his work became an inspiration for many during and after the Swinging Sixties. After moving to the USA in the early 1980s, Sassoon gave his name to hair-care products and the multinational company Procter and Gamble made Vidal Sassoon shampoos and conditioners world famous. A chain of Sassoon salons was also established. In 1982, Sassoon started the Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Anti-Semitism. He was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2009. 

 

Song

 

We will now sing a traditional song to conclude our Shabbat celebration. You have a copy of the words, so please join in as we sing.

 

HOW TO SING THE SONGS
ADON OLAM WORDS
Adon Olam David Solid Gould & The Temple Rockers
ALL MEN ARE BROTHERS
ALLE BRUDER SONG
ALLE BRIDER SONG
AL KOL ELEH WORDS
AL KOL ELEH
BASHANA words
BASHANA SONG
BEI MIR BIST DU SHEYN
BEI MIR BIST DU SCHEYN SONG
BMBDS song
CHIRIBIM WORDS
CHIRIBIM Song
DAYENU WORDS
DAYENU SONG ENGLISH
DAYENU SONG
DONNA DONNA
DONNA DONNA SONG
HALLELUYA
HALELUJA KARAOKE
HATIKVA
HATIKVA SONG
HATIKVA SONG
DAYENU
HATIKVA WORDS
HATIKVA SONG 1
HAVA NAGILA WORDS
HAVA NAGILA SONG
HAVA NAGILA KARAOKE
HAVEINU SHALOM ALEICHEM
HEVENU SHALOM ALEICHEM WORDS
HEVENU SHALOM ALECHEM SONG
HINEH MA TOV WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD WORDS
JERUSALEM THE GOLD KARAOKE IVRIT
JERUSALEM THE GOLD SONG
JERUSALEM THE GOLD JARAOKE
MAYIM MAYIM WORDS
MAYIM MAYIM DANCE
OIF'N PRIPITSCHOK song
OSE SHALOM
OSE SHALOM SONG
PAPI ROS'N
PAPIROS'N SONG
PARTISAN SONG 1
PARTISAN SONG
PARTISAN SONG MUSIC
RABBI ELIMELEKH
RABBI ELIMELEKH SONG
AS DER REBE SINGT
AS DER REBBE SINGT LEONARD COHEN
AS DER REBBE SINGT SONG
RAISINS WITH ALMONDS WORDS
SIMANTOV U MAZELTOV WORDS
SIMAN TOV MUSIC
MAZELTOV CLARINET
TUMBALALAIKA WORDS
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TUMBALALAIKA MUSIC
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA
TZENA TZENA 4
TZENA TZENA The Weavers
TZENA TZENA WORDS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
ALLE BRIDER KLEZMATICS
HATIKVA STREISAND
HATIKVA STREISAND
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
BIM BAM SHABBAT SHALOM FOR KIDS
YO EN ESTANDO - SEPHARDIC
ELIYAHU SEPHARDIC
SEPHARDIC SONG
SEPHARDIC SONG 3
Sholem Aleichem Susan Allen
Shalom Aleichem Susan Allen
OTHER VERSIONS OF SONGS
DUVID CROCKET WORDS
DUVID CROCKET MICKEY KATZ
MODERN PASSOVER SONGS
This will help you find yourself]